105

Let's say I have the following string:

something1:    +12.0   (some unnecessary trailing data (this must go))
something2:    +15.5   (some more unnecessary trailing data)
something4:    +9.0   (some other unnecessary data)
something1:    +13.5  (blah blah blah)

How do I turn that into simply

+12.0,+15.5,+9.0,+13.5

in bash?

2

18 Answers 18

101

You can use awk and sed:

awk -vORS=, '{ print $2 }' file.txt | sed 's/,$/\n/'

Or if you want to use a pipe:

echo "data" | awk -vORS=, '{ print $2 }' | sed 's/,$/\n/'

To break it down:

  • awk is great at handling data broken down into fields
  • -vORS=, sets the "output record separator" to ,, which is what you wanted
  • { print $2 } tells awk to print the second field for every record (line)
  • file.txt is your filename
  • sed just gets rid of the trailing , and turns it into a newline (if you want no newline, you can do s/,$//)
5
  • 1
    awk: invalid -v option :( – Marsellus Wallace Jun 15 '15 at 17:38
  • 7
    Add a space between -v and ORS=, (for me, on osx) – Graham P Heath Jun 25 '15 at 20:33
  • How to do the same command for getting pipe separated? awk -v ORS=| '{ print $1 }' DCMC.rtf | sed 's/,$/\n/' am getting an error – Yogesh Oct 4 '17 at 15:41
  • 3
    strangely, when I try to do this, the output is empty. – eternaltyro Apr 25 '19 at 7:07
  • 1
    I think for piped version it should be {print $1} otherwise I'm getting only commas in output – Przemysław Czechowski Jun 29 '20 at 11:56
188

Clean and simple:

awk '{print $2}' file.txt | paste -s -d, -
6
  • 6
    This is the best answer here, and obviously the correct way to do this – forresthopkinsa Sep 20 '16 at 4:03
  • How do I quote every values with single/double quote? – Hussain Dec 15 '16 at 9:05
  • 2
    @Hussain cat thing | awk -F',' '{ print "'\''" $7 "'\' '" }' | paste -s -d ',' – starbeamrainbowlabs May 2 '17 at 10:41
  • How use ,' as the delimiter? – Kasun Siyambalapitiya Nov 8 '19 at 9:39
  • Remember to handle Windows newlines (eg using dos2unix) if there are any CRLFs in the string. – Bowi Jul 2 '20 at 15:19
22
cat data.txt | xargs | sed -e 's/ /, /g'
1
  • I like solutions like this too but is the -e arg necessary here since there's only the first command being used for sed? I believe cat data.txt | xargs | sed 's/ /, /g' would work all the same. For example, echo -e "foo\nbar\nbazz" | xargs | sed 's/ /, /g' outputs foo, bar, bazz. – John Pancoast Feb 4 at 1:05
11
$ awk -v ORS=, '{print $2}' data.txt | sed 's/,$//'
+12.0,+15.5,+9.0,+13.5

$ cat data.txt | tr -s ' ' | cut -d ' ' -f 2 | tr '\n' ',' | sed 's/,$//'
+12.0,+15.5,+9.0,+13.5
1
  • cheers, what about if the input to awk was through standard input (just put function | awk... in your example? – Alex Coplan Jan 3 '12 at 15:21
11

This might work for you:

cut -d' ' -f5 file | paste -d',' -s
+12.0,+15.5,+9.0,+13.5

or

sed '/^.*\(+[^ ]*\).*/{s//\1/;H};${x;s/\n/,/g;s/.//p};d' file
+12.0,+15.5,+9.0,+13.5

or

sed 's/\S\+\s\+//;s/\s.*//;H;$!d;x;s/.//;s/\n/,/g' file

For each line in the file; chop off the first field and spaces following, chop off the remainder of the line following the second field and append to the hold space. Delete all lines except the last where we swap to the hold space and after deleting the introduced newline at the start, convert all newlines to ,'s.

N.B. Could be written:

sed 's/\S\+\s\+//;s/\s.*//;1h;1!H;$!d;x;s/\n/,/g' file
10

awk one liner

$ awk '{printf (NR>1?",":"") $2}' file

+12.0,+15.5,+9.0,+13.5
1
  • Format specifier "%s", should be added after printf to make it more robust i.e. to make it work with all kind of rows such as "foo %s". – jarno Nov 30 '20 at 10:35
8

This should work too

awk '{print $2}' file | sed ':a;{N;s/\n/,/};ba'
5

Try this easy code:

awk '{printf("%s,",$2)}' File1
1
  • It adds an extra comma – jarno Nov 29 '20 at 17:51
4

You can use grep:

grep -o "+\S\+" in.txt | tr '\n' ','

which finds the string starting with +, followed by any string \S\+, then convert new line characters into commas. This should be pretty quick for large files.

3

try this:

sedSelectNumbers='s".* \(+[0-9]*[.][0-9]*\) .*"\1,"'
sedClearLastComma='s"\(.*\),$"\1"'
cat file.txt |sed "$sedSelectNumbers" |tr -d "\n" |sed "$sedClearLastComma"

the good thing is the easy part of deleting newline "\n" characters!

EDIT: another great way to join lines into a single line with sed is this: |sed ':a;N;$!ba;s/\n/ /g' got from here.

1
  • That EDIT is awesome - +1! – JoeG Aug 30 '13 at 13:34
2

A solution written in pure Bash:

#!/bin/bash

sometext="something1:    +12.0   (some unnecessary trailing data (this must go))
something2:    +15.5   (some more unnecessary trailing data)
something4:    +9.0   (some other unnecessary data)
something1:    +13.5  (blah blah blah)"

a=()
while read -r a1 a2 a3; do
    # we can add some code here to check valid values or modify them
    a+=("${a2}")
done <<< "${sometext}"
# between parenthesis to modify IFS for the current statement only
(IFS=',' ; printf '%s: %s\n' "Result" "${a[*]}")

Result: +12.0,+15.5,+9.0,+13.5

1
  • Alternatively you could use read -r -a cols and thereafter add "${cols[1]} to the list a. – jarno Nov 30 '20 at 22:11
2

Don't seen this simple solution with awk

awk 'b{b=b","}{b=b$2}END{print b}' infile
0

With perl:

fg@erwin ~ $ perl -ne 'push @l, (split(/\s+/))[1]; END { print join(",", @l) . "\n" }' <<EOF
something1:    +12.0   (some unnecessary trailing data (this must go))
something2:    +15.5   (some more unnecessary trailing data)
something4:    +9.0   (some other unnecessary data)
something1:    +13.5  (blah blah blah)
EOF

+12.0,+15.5,+9.0,+13.5
0

You can also do it with two sed calls:

$ cat file.txt 
something1:    +12.0   (some unnecessary trailing data (this must go))
something2:    +15.5   (some more unnecessary trailing data)
something4:    +9.0   (some other unnecessary data)
something1:    +13.5  (blah blah blah)
$ sed 's/^[^:]*: *\([+0-9.]\+\) .*/\1/' file.txt | sed -e :a -e '$!N; s/\n/,/; ta'
+12.0,+15.5,+9.0,+13.5

First sed call removes uninteresting data, and the second join all lines.

0

You can also print like this:

Just awk: using printf

bash-3.2$ cat sample.log
something1:    +12.0   (some unnecessary trailing data (this must go))
something2:    +15.5   (some more unnecessary trailing data)
something4:    +9.0   (some other unnecessary data)
something1:    +13.5  (blah blah blah)

bash-3.2$ awk ' { if($2 != "") { if(NR==1) { printf $2 } else { printf "," $2 } } }' sample.log
+12.0,+15.5,+9.0,+13.5
0

Another Perl solution, similar to Dan Fego's awk:

perl -ane 'print "$F[1],"' file.txt | sed 's/,$/\n/'

-a tells perl to split the input line into the @F array, which is indexed starting at 0.

0

Well the hardest part probably is selecting the second "column" since I wouldn't know of an easy way to treat multiple spaces as one. For the rest it's easy. Use bash substitutions.

# cat bla.txt
something1:    +12.0   (some unnecessary trailing data (this must go))
something2:    +15.5   (some more unnecessary trailing data)
something4:    +9.0   (some other unnecessary data)
something1:    +13.5  (blah blah blah)

# cat bla.sh
OLDIFS=$IFS
IFS=$'\n'
for i in $(cat bla.txt); do
  i=$(echo "$i" | awk '{print $2}')
  u="${u:+$u, }$i"
done
IFS=$OLDIFS
echo "$u"

# bash ./bla.sh
+12.0, +15.5, +9.0, +13.5
0

Yet another AWK solution

Run

awk '{printf "%s", $c; while(getline){printf "%s%s", sep, $c}}' c=2 sep=','

to use the 2nd column to form the list separated by commas. Give the input as usual in standard input or as a file name argument.

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