61

As per the title, is it possible to declare type-negating constraints in c# 4 ?

8
  • 6
    even if there were, can you describe a use case? – Mitch Wheat Jan 4 '12 at 13:18
  • 1
    It is strange to observe you have such a requirement. you can only code against the type T that you know that belongs to a family of class. How can you code in generics otherwise ? Either you don't need generics in this case or you need to revise your use-cases. – this. __curious_geek Jan 4 '12 at 13:46
  • 2
    the use-case of interest was to allow the following overloads to co-exist void doIt<T>(T what){} void doIt<T>(IEnumerable<T> whats){} - at the moment there is ambiguity because T in the first method could be an IEnumerable<> (so I would like to specify that T should NOT be IEnumerable)... – Cel Jan 4 '12 at 14:14
  • 6
    I draw your attention to the fact that types with methods that take a T and a sequence of T usually have different names for the two methods. Add and AddRange, in List<T>, for example,. There's a reason for that. Follow that pattern. – Eric Lippert Jan 4 '12 at 14:51
  • 6
    Why the close vote? The answer to the question may be "no", but that doesn't mean the question is without value. – phoog Jan 4 '12 at 19:39
52

No - there's no such concept either in C# or in the CLR.

6
  • Will this concept make it to C# and/or CLR in the future? – Rand Random Jul 16 '15 at 14:25
  • @RandRandom: I haven't heard of any plans for it. – Jon Skeet Jul 16 '15 at 14:25
  • 1
    please add the latest C# version corresponding for that answer... in case in future this has to change... – Serge Nov 8 '18 at 23:23
  • 4
    @Serge: I'd far rather not do that. It would apply to almost every answer to language-based questions on the site, and it's infeasible to revisit every answer every time there's a new version of C#. – Jon Skeet Nov 9 '18 at 9:44
  • 1
    @TravisReed: I think that would add a lot of noise to a lot of answers, to be honest. Note that the question already specifies a version of C#, and people should look at the date of an answer for context IMO. – Jon Skeet Nov 7 '20 at 7:43
5

I found my self trying to implement the same case mentioned in the comments:

void doIt<T>(IEnumerable<T> what) { }
void doIt<T>(T whats) { }

I excepted the following code to reference the first method:

doIt(new List<T>());

But it actually references the second one.

One solution is to cast the argument like this:

doIt(new List<T>().AsEnumerable<T>());

The cast could be hidden by another overload:

void doIt<T>(List<T> whats) {
    doIt(whats.AsEnumerable<T>());
}
0
4

As far as I know it is not possible to do that.

What you can do is some runtime checking:

public bool MyGenericMethod<T>()
{
    // if (T is IEnumerable) // don't do this

    if (typeof(T).GetInterface("IEnumerable") == null)
        return false;

    // ...

    return true;
}
2
  • 2
    You can't use is like that - it tests whether an object is compatible with a type. – Jon Skeet Jan 4 '12 at 13:32
  • 3
    what you mean is if (typeof(T) == typeof(IEnumerable)) {} – kev Jan 4 '12 at 13:53
1

one use for this would be an option type.

public class Option<A,B> 
where A : !B
where B : !A
{
    private readonly A a;
    private readonly B b;

    private Option(){}

    public Option(A a) 
    {
        this.a = a
    }

    public Option(B b)  
    {
        this.b = b
    }
} 

runtime checking would of course work but you wouldn't have the benefit of type checking at compile time.

0

No, but it would be possible to check with an "is" and then handle it appropriately...

0
-1

As far as I know a Not contraint is not possible. You CAN use base classes and/or Interfaces to constrain a Generic. Faced with a similar problem leading to runtime failures, I implemented an interface on the classes the Generic was to handle:

public interface IOperations
{

}

public static T GenericOperationsFactory<T>(ILogger loggerInstance, ref ExecutionContext executionContext) 
        where T: IOperations
{
    var operationsContext = Factories.OperationsContextFactory(loggerInstance, ref executionContext);

    var operations = typeof(T).GetConstructor(new[] { typeof(OperationsContext) }).Invoke(new object[] { operationsContext });

    return (T)operations;
}

public abstract class OperationsBase:IOperations
{
    protected OperationsContext Context { get; set; }

    public OperationsBase(OperationsContext context)
    {
        Context = context;
    }
...

public class ListsOperations : OperationsBase
{
    public ListsOperations(OperationsContext context) :
        base(context)
    {

    }

alternatively:

public static T GenericOperationsFactory<T>(ILogger loggerInstance, ref ExecutionContext executionContext) 
        where T: OperationsBase
{
    var operationsContext = Factories.OperationsContextFactory(loggerInstance, ref executionContext);

    var operations = typeof(T).GetConstructor(new[] { typeof(OperationsContext) }).Invoke(new object[] { operationsContext });

    return (T)operations;
}

public abstract class OperationsBase
{
    protected OperationsContext Context { get; set; }

    public OperationsBase(OperationsContext context)
    {
        Context = context;
    }
...

public class ListsOperations : OperationsBase
{
    public ListsOperations(OperationsContext context) :
        base(context)
    {

    }
-2

You use a constraint so you can ensure the type you use has some properties/methods/... you want to use.

A generic with a type-negating constraint doesn't make any sense, as there is no purpose to know the absence of some properties/methods you do not want to use.

2
  • 4
    obviously you have not received the error: ##'<class>' cannot implement both '<interface<generictype1,generictype2>>' and '<interface<generictype3,generictype4>>' because they may unify for some type parameter substitutions## .. there are certainly cases when you want to specify that the genericstype2 cannot be generictype4 – Brett Caswell Oct 3 '14 at 21:26
  • 1
    I was able to work around my scenario by using a series of abstract classes that implement an instance of the similar interface, and inherit the abstract class.. I suppose that is how Action<T1, T2, T3> and so on do it.. – Brett Caswell Oct 3 '14 at 21:39

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