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I'm relatively new to BASH and I'm trying to use awk to filter out column 1 data based on the 4th column of a text file. If the 4th column of data matches the range of x, then it'll output column 1 data. "x" is suppose to be a range of numbers 1-10 (1,2,3..10).

awk -F: '{ if($4=="x") print $1}' filename.txt

filename.txt 
sample1 0 0 4
sample2 0 0 10
sample3 0 0 15
sample4 0 0 20

Actual use:

awk -F: '{ if($4=="1-10") print $1}' sample.txt
output = sample1, sample2, sample3, sample4

It should be: sample1 sample2 only.

Is there is an error in the syntax that I'm not seeing or I could be possibly using this syntax completely wrong?

0

6 Answers 6

71
awk '{ if ($4 >= 1 && $4 <= 10) print $1 }' sample.txt
5
  • 15
    You can use expressions as patterns and do away with the if, like so:awk '$4 <= 10 && $4 >= 1 { print $1 }' file.txt
    – potong
    Jan 4, 2012 at 21:54
  • 3
    Also, awk '1 <= $4 && $4 <= 10' sample.txt works great for people like me that want to output whole lines based on value of one column.
    – arekolek
    Aug 3, 2016 at 20:38
  • @arekolek may I ask what should I do if my 1 and 10 are variables $one and $ten? I tried awk '"'"$one"'" <= $4 && $4 <= "'"$ten"'"' sample.txt , but the less than ten part did not work somehow
    – Helene
    Oct 24, 2017 at 23:12
  • 1
    @Helene, I understand one is a bash variable, so I'd try awk "$one <= \$4 && \$4 <= $ten" so that bash substitutes only $one and $ten in the string passed to awk.
    – arekolek
    Oct 25, 2017 at 7:09
  • 1
    Use -v option to pass variable into awk: awk -v a="$one" -v b="$ten" 'a <= $4 && $4 <= b'
    – ruvim
    Nov 24, 2017 at 10:51
18
awk '$4 ~ /^[1-9]$|^10$/{print $1}' sample.txt

output:

sample1
sample2

explanation:

  • ^[1-9]$ --> $4 must be a single digit from 1 to 9
  • | (the pipe) --> or
  • ^10$ --> $4 must be the number 10
7
awk -F ':' '$4 >= 1 && $4 <= 10{print $1}'
1
  • 1
    already suggested in comments. Read all the answers before answering something very similar, specially if the question is old. Nov 2, 2016 at 20:41
3

There may be a way to do it using only awk (nevermind, see my edit below), but I don't know of it. I'd combine it with grep:

egrep ' ([1-9]|10)$' sample.txt | awk '{print $1}'

I think you are matching the fourth column with the string "1-10" not the range. Also, -F: will change the delimiter to a colon rather than a space.

Edit:

awk '$4 ~ /^([1-9]|10)$/ {print $1}' sample.txt
2

If you want awk to look up values from a range then you can set that range in the BEGIN statement.

awk 'BEGIN{for (i=1;i<=10;i++) a[i]} ($4 in a){print $1}' sample.txt 

Test:

[jaypal:~/Temp] cat sample.txt 
sample1 0 0 4
sample2 0 0 10
sample3 0 0 15
sample4 0 0 20
[jaypal:~/Temp] awk 'BEGIN{for (i=1;i<=10;i++) a[i]} ($4 in a){print $1}' sample.txt 
sample1
sample2
1

If Perl is an option, you can try this solution similar to Kambus's awk solution:

perl -lane 'print $F[0] if $F[3] >= 1 && $F[3] <= 10' sample.txt

These command-line options are used:

  • -n loop around every line of the input file, do not automatically print every line

  • -l removes newlines before processing, and adds them back in afterwards

  • -a autosplit mode – split input lines into the @F array.

  • -e execute the perl code

@F is the array of words in each line, indexed starting with 0

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