34

I need to write a function that receives a string and a regex. I need to check if there is a match and return the start and end location of a match. (The regex was already compiled by qr//.)

The function might also receive a "global" flag and then I need to return the (start,end) pairs of all the matches.

I cannot change the regex, not even add () around it as the user might use () and \1. Maybe I can use (?:).

Example: given "ababab" and the regex qr/ab/, in the global case I need to get back 3 pairs of (start, end).

1
  • Looking at Leon's interpretation vs my own you might want to clarify whether the flag corresponds to the /g modifier or any () captures in the regex. Sep 17 '08 at 20:58
79

The built-in variables @- and @+ hold the start and end positions, respectively, of the last successful match. $-[0] and $+[0] correspond to entire pattern, while $-[N] and $+[N] correspond to the $N ($1, $2, etc.) submatches.

1
  • 6
    Note that $+[0] etc. (the "end positions") give the index of the character following the match, not the last character of the match itself.
    – TextGeek
    Sep 8 '15 at 19:58
21

Forget my previous post, I've got a better idea.

sub match_positions {
    my ($regex, $string) = @_;
    return if not $string =~ /$regex/;
    return ($-[0], $+[0]);
}
sub match_all_positions {
    my ($regex, $string) = @_;
    my @ret;
    while ($string =~ /$regex/g) {
        push @ret, [ $-[0], $+[0] ];
    }
    return @ret
}

This technique doesn't change the regex in any way.

Edited to add: to quote from perlvar on $1..$9. "These variables are all read-only and dynamically scoped to the current BLOCK." In other words, if you want to use $1..$9, you cannot use a subroutine to do the matching.

3
  • You can use a subroutine to do the match, but you want the captures you'll have to use substr(), @-, and @+ to extract the matches and return them to the user. Sep 17 '08 at 23:24
  • Correct, but that's a particular PITA. Sep 17 '08 at 23:51
  • Your match_positions function returns undef in one of the possible branches and an array in the rest of the cases. Is that really ok?
    – antred
    Jun 30 '20 at 14:55
8

The pos function gives you the position of the match. If you put your regex in parentheses you can get the length (and thus the end) using length $1. Like this

sub match_positions {
    my ($regex, $string) = @_;
    return if not $string =~ /($regex)/;
    return (pos($string) - length $1, pos($string));
}
sub all_match_positions {
    my ($regex, $string) = @_;
    my @ret;
    while ($string =~ /($regex)/g) {
        push @ret, [pos($string) - length $1, pos($string)];
    }
    return @ret
}
2
  • 3
    this looks totally incorrect. instead of pos , use pos($string) in all_match_positions, in the other case, match_positions it does not work at all
    – Aftershock
    Dec 23 '12 at 9:32
  • 1
    The return if not $string =~ /($regex)/; gives you not the possibility to call pos($string) with correct results.
    – huckfinn
    Apr 22 at 12:49
0

You can also use the deprecated $` variable, if you're willing to have all the REs in your program execute slower. From perlvar:

   $‘      The string preceding whatever was matched by the last successful pattern match (not
           counting any matches hidden within a BLOCK or eval enclosed by the current BLOCK).
           (Mnemonic: "`" often precedes a quoted string.)  This variable is read-only.

           The use of this variable anywhere in a program imposes a considerable performance penalty
           on all regular expression matches.  See "BUGS".
0
#!/usr/bin/perl

# search the postions for the CpGs in human genome

sub match_positions {
    my ($regex, $string) = @_;
    return if not $string =~ /($regex)/;
    return (pos($string), pos($string) + length $1);
}
sub all_match_positions {
    my ($regex, $string) = @_;
    my @ret;
    while ($string =~ /($regex)/g) {
        push @ret, [(pos($string)-length $1),pos($string)-1];
    }
    return @ret
}

my $regex='CG';
my $string="ACGACGCGCGCG";
my $cgap=3;    
my @pos=all_match_positions($regex,$string);

my @hgcg;

foreach my $pos(@pos){
    push @hgcg,@$pos[1];
}

foreach my $i(0..($#hgcg-$cgap+1)){
my $len=$hgcg[$i+$cgap-1]-$hgcg[$i]+2;
print "$len\n"; 
}

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