31

I have been asked in an interview how do i allocate a 2-D array and below was my solution to it.

#include <stdlib.h>

int **array;
array = malloc(nrows * sizeof(int *));

for(i = 0; i < nrows; i++)
{
    array[i] = malloc(ncolumns * sizeof(int));
    if(array[i] == NULL)
    {
        fprintf(stderr, "out of memory\n");
        exit or return
    }
}

I thought I had done a good job but then he asked me to do it using one malloc() statement not two. I don't have any idea how to achieve it.

Can anyone suggest me some idea to do it in single malloc()?

3
  • Actually this is making (nrows + 1) malloc calls.
    – user3091673
    Dec 8, 2019 at 21:20
  • Possible duplicate of Correctly allocating multi-dimensional arrays.
    – Lundin
    Sep 15, 2021 at 6:28
  • Warning: many of the answers posted here are harmful. Read the answers by John Bode and chux, ignore the rest.
    – Lundin
    Sep 15, 2021 at 6:30

8 Answers 8

48

Just compute the total amount of memory needed for both nrows row-pointers, and the actual data, add it all up, and do a single call:

int **array = malloc(nrows * sizeof *array + (nrows * (ncolumns * sizeof **array));

If you think this looks too complex, you can split it up and make it a bit self-documenting by naming the different terms of the size expression:

int **array; /* Declare this first so we can use it with sizeof. */
const size_t row_pointers_bytes = nrows * sizeof *array;
const size_t row_elements_bytes = ncolumns * sizeof **array;
array = malloc(row_pointers_bytes + nrows * row_elements_bytes);

You then need to go through and initialize the row pointers so that each row's pointer points at the first element for that particular row:

size_t i;
int * const data = array + nrows;
for(i = 0; i < nrows; i++)
  array[i] = data + i * ncolumns;

Note that the resulting structure is subtly different from what you get if you do e.g. int array[nrows][ncolumns], because we have explicit row pointers, meaning that for an array allocated like this, there's no real requirement that all rows have the same number of columns.

It also means that an access like array[2][3] does something distinct from a similar-looking access into an actual 2d array. In this case, the innermost access happens first, and array[2] reads out a pointer from the 3rd element in array. That pointer is then treatet as the base of a (column) array, into which we index to get the fourth element.

In contrast, for something like

int array2[4][3];

which is a "packed" proper 2d array taking up just 12 integers' worth of space, an access like array[3][2] simply breaks down to adding an offset to the base address to get at the element.

16
  • @Unwind can i have pictorial view of memory for this solution it helpes in greated details to understand this code. Jan 5, 2012 at 10:04
  • @AmitSinghTomar: I don't think I can represent this in ASCII clearly, and don't have the time to draw something in a real graphics program at the moment, sorry. Perhaps someone can step in? :)
    – unwind
    Jan 5, 2012 at 10:08
  • 1
    @AmitSinghTomar It takes more memory since you have a pointer for each row, which is necessary to "hide" the fact that the width of the array is dynamic. It allows double indexing like array[i][j] by making array[i] be a valid pointer at that row's data.
    – unwind
    Feb 25, 2015 at 21:18
  • 1
    One question: the row int * const data = array + nrows; generates a warning for me: incompatible pointer types initializing 'int *const' with an expression of type 'int **'; dereference with *. Is this to be ignored? Otherwise thx for a great answer.
    – Sahand
    Jul 17, 2017 at 11:43
  • 1
    @OS2 It's faster by necessity (heap allocation is an expensive operation), and it minimizes per-allocation overhead. I do believe it can (and very often will) lead to tighter layout in memory, yes, since new allocations are aligned to fit any data and that allocation might be more wasteful than what is needed for the actual arrays here.
    – unwind
    Dec 13, 2019 at 8:43
16
int **array = malloc (nrows * sizeof(int *) + (nrows * (ncolumns * sizeof(int)));

This works because in C, arrays are just all the elements one after another as a bunch of bytes. There is no metadata or anything. malloc() does not know whether it is allocating for use as chars, ints or lines in an array.

Then, you have to initialize:

int *offs = &array[nrows]; /*  same as int *offs = array + nrows; */
for (i = 0; i < nrows; i++, offs += ncolumns) {
    array[i] = offs;
}
10
  • Thanks Amigable for your solution but I don't understand where int *offs = &arr[nrows] come from,I mean purpose of this line and where we have declared &arr[nrows] ?? Jan 5, 2012 at 9:55
  • The added setup code looks wrong, the row stride is 1, should be ncolumns.
    – unwind
    Jan 5, 2012 at 10:00
  • int* data = array + nrows; in unwinds answer is the same as int* offs = &array[nrows]; @AmitSinghTomar Jan 5, 2012 at 10:23
  • Thanks @AmigableClarkKant got your point a[i]=*(a+i) ,something like this Jan 5, 2012 at 10:28
  • Could you please explain the second part ? Nov 2, 2016 at 14:53
11

Here's another approach.

If you know the number of columns at compile time, you can do something like this:

#define COLS ... // integer value > 0
...
size_t rows;
int (*arr)[COLS];
...              // get number of rows
arr = malloc(sizeof *arr * rows);
if (arr)
{
  size_t i, j;
  for (i = 0; i < rows; i++)
    for (j = 0; j < COLS; j++)
      arr[i][j] = ...;
}

If you're working in C99, you can use a pointer to a VLA:

size_t rows, cols;
...               // get rows and cols
int (*arr)[cols] = malloc(sizeof *arr * rows);
if (arr)
{
  size_t i, j;
  for (i = 0; i < rows; i++)
    for (j = 0; j < cols; j++)
      arr[i][j] = ...;
}
6

How do we allocate a 2-D array using One malloc statement (?)

No answers, so far, allocate memory for a true 2D array.

int **array is a pointer to pointer to int. array is not a pointer to a 2D array.

int a[2][3] is an example of a true 2D array or array 2 of array 3 of int


To allocate memory for a true 2D array, with C99, use malloc() and save to a pointer to a variable-length array (VLA)

// Simply allocate and initialize in one line of code
int (*c)[nrows][ncolumns] = malloc(sizeof *c);

if (c == NULL) {
  fprintf(stderr, "out of memory\n");
  return;
} 
// Use c
(*c)[1][2] = rand();
...
free(c);

Without VLA support, if the dimensions are constants, code can use

#define NROW 4
#define NCOL 5
int (*d)[NROW][NCOL] = malloc(sizeof *d);
1
  • 1
    Wow, that's trippy. Sep 15, 2021 at 7:20
1

You should be able to do this with (bit ugly with all the casting though):

int** array;
size_t pitch, ptrs, i;   
char* base; 
pitch = rows * sizeof(int);
ptrs = sizeof(int*) * rows;
array = (int**)malloc((columns * pitch) + ptrs);
base = (char*)array + ptrs;
for(i = 0; i < rows; i++)
{
    array[i] = (int*)(base + (pitch * i));
}
9
  • Clunky code - see @Amigable's answer for a more elegant and readable solution
    – Paul R
    Jan 5, 2012 at 9:44
  • @PaulR: when I posted my answer he hadn't updated his yet, I prefer unwind's answer though
    – Necrolis
    Jan 5, 2012 at 9:46
  • @Necrolis, I am probably damaged from trying to optimize code on 80s computers. :-) Back then, multiply inside loops were best avoided. Jan 5, 2012 at 9:48
  • 1
    @Random832: everything is done using a multiple of sizeof(int), the only alignment problems would come from malloc (which I doubt).
    – Necrolis
    Jan 5, 2012 at 14:53
  • 1
    @Necrolis My point was, sizeof(int *) (therefore sizeof(int*) * rows) may not be a multiple of sizeof(int). It is, on most common platforms, but that's not guaranteed. Like I said, it's more likely to be an issue for other types like double.
    – Random832
    Jan 5, 2012 at 15:14
0

I'm not a fan of this "array of pointers to array" to solve the multi dimension array paradigm. Always favored a single dimension array, at access the element with array[ row * cols + col]? No problems encapsulating everything in a class, and implementing a 'at' method.

If you insist on accessing the members of the array with this notation: Matrix[i][j], you can do a little C++ magic. @John solution tries to do it this way, but he requires the number of column to be known at compile time. With some C++ and overriding the operator[], you can get this completely:

class Row
{
private:
    int* _p;

public:
    Row( int* p )                   { _p = p; }
    int& operator[](int col)        { return _p[col]; }
};


class Matrix
{
private:
    int* _p;
    int _cols;

public:
    Matrix( int rows, int cols )  { _cols=cols; _p = (int*)malloc(rows*cols ); }
    Row operator[](int row)       { return _p + row*_cols; }
};

So now, you can use the Matrix object, for example to create a multiplication table:

Matrix mtrx(rows, cols);
for( i=0; i<rows; ++i ) {
    for( j=0; j<rows; ++j ) {
        mtrx[i][j] = i*j;
    }
}

You should now that the optimizer is doing the right thing and there is no call function or any other kind of overhead. No constructor is called. As long as you don't move the Matrix between function, even the _cols variable isn't created. The statement mtrx[i][j] basically does mtrx[i*cols+j].

1
0

It can be done as follows:

#define NUM_ROWS 10
#define NUM_COLS 10

int main(int argc, char **argv)
{
    char (*p)[NUM_COLS] = NULL;
    p = malloc(NUM_ROWS * NUM_COLS);
    memset(p, 81, NUM_ROWS * NUM_COLS);
    p[2][3] = 'a';
    for (int i = 0; i < NUM_ROWS; i++) {
        for (int j = 0; j < NUM_COLS; j++) {
            printf("%c\t", p[i][j]);
        }
        printf("\n");
    }
} // end of main
-2

You can allocate (row*column) * sizeof(int) bytes of memory using malloc. Here is a code snippet to demonstrate.

int row = 3, col = 4;
int *arr = (int *)malloc(row * col * sizeof(int));

int i, j, count = 0;
for (i = 0; i <  r; i++)
  for (j = 0; j < c; j++)
     *(arr + i*col + j) = ++count; //row major memory layout

for (i = 0; i <  r; i++)
  for (j = 0; j < c; j++)
     printf("%d ", *(arr + i*col + j));
1
  • Getting segmentation fault with this approach Apr 11, 2020 at 14:54

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