4

In short, I have a relatively positioned div with the following style:

.div1 {
    background-image: url(../images/header.jpg);
    background-repeat: no-repeat;
    width: 100%;
    height: 269px;  
    margin:0 auto;
    padding:0px;
    position: relative;
    background-position: center top;
}

and another div in it styled like this:

.div2 {
    position: relative;
    width: 815px;
    height: 74px;
    margin-top:100px;
}

Interestingly, due to the margin of div2 (child) inside div1 (parent) and the fact that it's positioned relatively, this pushes div1 (which is the strange thing) down by 100px. Even more interesting, if I either added a border to div1 or wrote something in it, this behavior goes away.

If anyone knows why this is happening and also has a clean solution to this problem, I'd very much like to pick your brain about it.

  • div1 is .header and div2 is div.test? – Jawad Jan 5 '12 at 10:36
  • Yes, @Jawad. Thank you for the question, I did not realize they had different names and I corrected the problem. – Andrei Oniga Mar 2 '12 at 6:17
1

This is happening because of "collapsing margins".

The spec:

Some easier reads:

As already suggested by Aram Mkrtchyan, the easiest fix in this case is probably to add overflow: hidden to .header. Here are some more ideas.

|improve this answer|||||
3

there is an example

http://jsfiddle.net/amkrtchyan/urNRR/

.header {
    background-image: url(../images/header.jpg);
    background-repeat: no-repeat;
    width: 100%;
    height: 269px;  
    margin:0 auto;
    padding:0px;
    position: relative;
    background-position: center top;
    overflow: hidden // add this
}
|improve this answer|||||
  • Thanks Aram, this was indeed an interesting idea – Andrei Oniga Jan 12 '12 at 13:39

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