75

How can I check with Linq if a collection does not contain an object. I.E. The opposite of Any<T>.

I could invert the result with a ! but for readability I wondered if there was a more better way to do this? Should I add the extension myself?

  • More readable then ! ? Contains, Exists ? – Tigran Jan 5 '12 at 11:08
  • 3
    Yeah, there's no None<T>. I often use such custom extensions for readability (for example I don't like the !dictionary.ContainsKey(key) syntax, so I implemented dictionary.NoKey(key) instead. – Konrad Morawski Jan 5 '12 at 11:09
  • 2
    @Morawski: I've started using ConcurrentDictionary, because it's go the really handy GetOrAdd method, even when I don't need concurrency. – Roger Lipscombe Jan 5 '12 at 11:21
  • @RogerLipscombe as far as I understand concurrent collections, they are locking the collection while adding/reading data, isn't it going to be much slower than regular collection? Isn't it better to write small extension? – OlegI May 8 '19 at 12:49
84

You can easily create a None extension method:

public static bool None<TSource>(this IEnumerable<TSource> source)
{
    return !source.Any();
}

public static bool None<TSource>(this IEnumerable<TSource> source, Func<TSource, bool> predicate)
{
    return !source.Any(predicate);
}
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  • 1
    I feel this would be a nice addition to standard Linq. – Ivan Nov 18 '15 at 12:25
  • 1
    @Ivan, it's not in Linq itself, but it's part of my Linq.Extras library – Thomas Levesque Nov 18 '15 at 12:45
  • @ThomasLevesque Hey, Thomas, nice library! Thanks for the tip! – CodeOrElse Apr 10 '17 at 13:43
57

The opposite of verifying that any (at least one) record matches a certain criteria would be verifying that all records do not match the criteria.

You didn't post your full example, but if you wanted the opposite of something like:

var isJohnFound = MyRecords.Any(x => x.FirstName == "John");

You could use:

var isJohnNotFound = MyRecords.All(x => x.FirstName != "John");
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  • Just came across this today on Google, and while I agree with your approach, I typically use var isJohnNotFound = !MyRecords.All(x => x.FirstName == "John"); – Chris May 9 '13 at 19:18
  • Of course, I goofed. When I do this it's not with a single field being checked. Usually it's more like !MyRecords.All(x => InvalidNames.Any(n => n == x.Name)); So check every entry against a list of invalid names, only if none match will the result be true. – Chris May 10 '13 at 12:55
2

In addition to the answers added, if you don't want to wrap Any() method you can implement None() as follows:

public static bool None<TSource>(this IEnumerable<TSource> source) 
{
    if (source == null) { throw new ArgumentNullException(nameof(source)); }

    using (IEnumerator<TSource> enumerator = source.GetEnumerator())
    {
        return !enumerator.MoveNext();
    }
}

public static bool None<TSource>(this IEnumerable<TSource> source, Func<TSource, bool> predicate)
{
    if (source == null) { throw new ArgumentNullException(nameof(source)); }
    if (predicate == null) { throw new ArgumentNullException(nameof(predicate)); }

    foreach (TSource item in source)
    {
        if (predicate(item))
        {
            return false;
        }
    }

    return true;
}

In addition to that for the parameterless overload you can apply ICollection<T> optimization, which actually does not exist in LINQ implemenetation.

ICollection<TSource> collection = source as ICollection<TSource>;
if (collection != null) { return collection.Count == 0; }
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2

Found this thread when I wanted to find out if a collection does not contain one object but I do not want to check that all objects in a collection match the given criteria. I ended up doing a check like this:

var exists = modifiedCustomers.Any(x => x.Key == item.Key);

if (!exists)
{
    continue;
}
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