48

I'm in the process of writing a WCF service that will allow an ASP.Net web site to retrieve files (based on this article). My problem is that when I return the stream, it's blank.

For simplicity, I've isolated the code into a simple winforms app to try and find what the problem is with returning a stream and this is the code:

    private Stream TestStream()
    {
        Stream fs = File.OpenRead(@"c:\testdocument.docx");
        return fs;
    }

    // This method converts the filestream into a byte array so that when it is 
    // used in my ASP.Net project the file can be sent using response.Write
    private void Test()
    {            
        System.IO.MemoryStream data = new System.IO.MemoryStream();
        System.IO.Stream str = TestStream();

        str.CopyTo(data);
        byte[] buf = new byte[data.Length];
        data.Read(buf, 0, buf.Length);                       
    }

The result of this code is that buf is 12,587 bytes long (the correct length of the file) but it just contains 0's.

The Word document opens without problems if I try it, am I missing something obvious?

  • 1
    Are you running as administrator? Try pulling the document from 'My Documents' or another folder other than root. – keyboardP Jan 5 '12 at 11:13
  • 1
    @keyboard - good advice but it would produce an exception, not 0s and correct length. – Henk Holterman Jan 5 '12 at 11:16
  • @HenkHolterman - Ah yes, that's true. – keyboardP Jan 5 '12 at 11:17
  • I'm running this test code locally, so that shouldn't be a problem. I've done a quick test using a streamreader and it can access the file without any problems. – GrandMasterFlush Jan 5 '12 at 11:21
39

You forgot to seek:

str.CopyTo(data);
data.Seek(0, SeekOrigin.Begin); // <-- missing line
byte[] buf = new byte[data.Length];
data.Read(buf, 0, buf.Length);
15

Options:

  • Use data.Seek as suggested by ken2k
  • Use the somewhat simpler Position property:

    data.Position = 0;
    
  • Use the ToArray call in MemoryStream to make your life simpler to start with:

    byte[] buf = data.ToArray();
    

The third option would be my preferred approach.

Note that you should have a using statement to close the file stream automatically (and optionally for the MemoryStream), and I'd add a using directive for System.IO to make your code cleaner:

byte[] buf;
using (MemoryStream data = new MemoryStream())
{
    using (Stream file = TestStream())
    {
        file.CopyTo(data);
        buf = data.ToArray();
    }
}

// Use buf

You might also want to create an extension method on Stream to do this for you in one place, e.g.

public static byte[] CopyToArray(this Stream input)
{
    using (MemoryStream memoryStream = new MemoryStream())
    {
        input.CopyTo(memoryStream);
        return memoryStream.ToArray();
    }
}

Note that this doesn't close the input stream.

  • Thanks Jon, that's a far nicer way of doing it. The WCF service does utilitise the using statements, I'd just omitted them from the test code to make it easier to read when I posted it on here. – GrandMasterFlush Jan 5 '12 at 11:34
5

You forgot to reset the position of the memory stream:

private void Test()
{            
    System.IO.MemoryStream data = new System.IO.MemoryStream();
    System.IO.Stream str = TestStream();

    str.CopyTo(data);
    // Reset memory stream
    data.Seek(0, SeekOrigin.Begin);
    byte[] buf = new byte[data.Length];
    data.Read(buf, 0, buf.Length);                       
}

Update:

There is one more thing to note: It usually pays not to ignore the return values of methods. A more robust implementation should check how many bytes have been read after the call returns:

private void Test()
{            
    using(MemoryStream data = new MemoryStream())
    {
        using(Stream str = TestStream())
        {
           str.CopyTo(data);
        }
        // Reset memory stream
        data.Seek(0, SeekOrigin.Begin);
        byte[] buf = new byte[data.Length];
        int bytesRead = data.Read(buf, 0, buf.Length);

        Debug.Assert(bytesRead == data.Length, 
                    String.Format("Expected to read {0} bytes, but read {1}.",
                        data.Length, bytesRead));
    }                     
}
3

You need

    str.CopyTo(data);
    data.Position = 0; // reset to beginning
    byte[] buf = new byte[data.Length];
    data.Read(buf, 0, buf.Length);  

And since your Test() method is imitating the client it ought to Close() or Dispose() the str Stream. And the memoryStream too, just out of principal.

  • Thanks Henk, that worked well. The WCF code will close / dispose the streams accordingly, I left this out on the test app. – GrandMasterFlush Jan 5 '12 at 11:29
  • I gathered, but that makes it an incomplete test app. – Henk Holterman Jan 5 '12 at 11:40
  • Agreed, but the app was only for testing / debugging the problem, not a test harness or anything involved in any formal testing. It was easier for me to port the code into a simple app then to try and debug the WCF service on its server. – GrandMasterFlush Jan 5 '12 at 13:05
1

Try changing your code to this:

private void Test()
{            
    System.IO.MemoryStream data = new System.IO.MemoryStream(TestStream());

    byte[] buf = new byte[data.Length];
    data.Read(buf, 0, buf.Length);                       
}

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