19

How do I loop through the all controls in a window in WPF?

2
7

Class to get a list of all the children's components of a control:

class Utility
    {
        private static StringBuilder sbListControls;

        public static StringBuilder GetVisualTreeInfo(Visual element)
        {
            if (element == null)
            {
                throw new ArgumentNullException(String.Format("Element {0} is null !", element.ToString()));
            }

            sbListControls = new StringBuilder();

            GetControlsList(element, 0);

            return sbListControls;
        }

        private static void GetControlsList(Visual control, int level)
        {
            const int indent = 4;
            int ChildNumber = VisualTreeHelper.GetChildrenCount(control);

            for (int i = 0; i <= ChildNumber - 1; i++)
            {
                Visual v = (Visual)VisualTreeHelper.GetChild(control, i);

                sbListControls.Append(new string(' ', level * indent));
                sbListControls.Append(v.GetType());
                sbListControls.Append(Environment.NewLine);

                if (VisualTreeHelper.GetChildrenCount(v) > 0)
                {
                    GetControlsList(v, level + 1);
                }
            }
        }
    } 
2
  • 2
    Isn't looping through logical tree is better and efficent than looping through visual tree. – MegaMind Feb 13 '12 at 10:00
  • sbListControls should be a local variable, just in case these methods are called at the same time by multiple threads. – Roland Illig Jun 4 '16 at 10:32
16

I found this in the MSDN documenation so it helps.

// Enumerate all the descendants of the visual object.
static public void EnumVisual(Visual myVisual)
{
    for (int i = 0; i < VisualTreeHelper.GetChildrenCount(myVisual); i++)
    {
        // Retrieve child visual at specified index value.
        Visual childVisual = (Visual)VisualTreeHelper.GetChild(myVisual, i);

        // Do processing of the child visual object.

        // Enumerate children of the child visual object.
        EnumVisual(childVisual);
    }
}

Looks simpler to me. I used it to find textboxes in a form and clear their data.

2
  • I posted another answer based on this that actually returns an IEnumerable<Visual> so that the end user can just use a regular for-loop, etc. This makes enumerating the children collection very simple, and allows for early abortion via break; etc. Take a look. – BrainSlugs83 May 3 '15 at 22:54
  • When I try to reproduce this I get an error on myVisual (i.e. .GetChildrenCount(myVisual) & .GetChild(myVisual, i) ) saying "cannot convert from 'Windows.UI.Composition.Visual' to 'Windows.UI.Xaml.DependencyObject'"? Do WPF solutions work in the UWP environment? Am I using the wrong using directive (Windows.UI.Composition) ? – gaw Dec 20 '15 at 12:44
12

This way is superior to the MSDN method, in that it's reusable, and it allows early aborting of the loop (i.e. via, break;, etc.) -- it optimizes the for loop in that it saves a method call for each iteration -- and it also lets you use regular for loops to loop through a Visual's children, or even recurse it's children and it's grand children -- so it's much simpler to consume.

To consume it, you can just write a regular foreach loop (or even use LINQ):

foreach (var ctrl in myWindow.GetChildren())
{
    // Process children here!
}

Or if you don't want to recurse:

foreach (var ctrl in myWindow.GetChildren(false))
{
    // Process children here!
}

To make it work, you just need put this extension method into any static class, and then you'll be able to write code like the above anytime you like:

public static IEnumerable<Visual> GetChildren(this Visual parent, bool recurse = true)
{
    if (parent != null)
    {
        int count = VisualTreeHelper.GetChildrenCount(parent);
        for (int i = 0; i < count; i++)
        {
            // Retrieve child visual at specified index value.
            var child = VisualTreeHelper.GetChild(parent, i) as Visual;

            if (child != null)
            {
                yield return child;

                if (recurse)
                {
                    foreach (var grandChild in child.GetChildren(true))
                    {
                        yield return grandChild;
                    }
                }
            }
        }
    }
}

Also, if you don't like recursion being on by default, you can change the extension method's declaration to have recurse = false be the default behavior.

1

I've used the following to get all controls.

    public static IList<Control> GetControls(this DependencyObject parent)
    {            
        var result = new List<Control>();
        for (int x = 0; x < VisualTreeHelper.GetChildrenCount(parent); x++)
        {
            DependencyObject child = VisualTreeHelper.GetChild(parent, x);
            var instance = child as Control;

            if (null != instance)
                result.Add(instance);

            result.AddRange(child.GetControls());
        } 
        return result;
    }
0

A slight variation on the MSDN answer ... just pass in an empty List of Visual objects into it and your collection will be populated with all the child visuals:

/// <summary>
/// Enumerate all the descendants (children) of a visual object.
/// </summary>
/// <param name="parent">Starting visual (parent).</param>
/// <param name="collection">Collection, into which is placed all of the descendant visuals.</param>
public static void EnumVisual(Visual parent, List<Visual> collection)
{
    for (int i = 0; i < VisualTreeHelper.GetChildrenCount(parent); i++)
    {
        // Get the child visual at specified index value.
        Visual childVisual = (Visual)VisualTreeHelper.GetChild(parent, i);

        // Add the child visual object to the collection.
        collection.Add(childVisual);

        // Recursively enumerate children of the child visual object.
        EnumVisual(childVisual, collection);
    }
}
1
  • I posted another answer based on yours that actually returns an IEnumerable<Visual> so that the end user can just use a regular for-loop, etc. This saves the overhead of creating a list, and allows for early abortion via break; etc. Take a look. – BrainSlugs83 May 3 '15 at 22:52

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.