38

This kind of seems like a noob question, but I could not find an answer for this question specifically.

I have this class:

public class Quotes{ 
    public string symbol; 
    public string extension
}

And am using this:

HashSet<Quotes> values = new HashSet<Quotes>();

However I am able to add the same Quotes object multiple times. For example, my Quotes object may have 'symbol' equal to 'A' and 'extension' equal to '=n', and this Quotes object appears multiple times in the HashSet (viewing Hashset through debug mode). I had thought that when calling

values.Add(new Quotes(symb, ext));

with the same symb and ext, 'false' would be returned and the element would not be added. I have a feeling it has something to do with comparing Quotes objects when the HashSet is adding a new object. Any help would be greatly appreciated!

  • Perhaps you would want to look at HashTable or even better Dictionary<string,sting> – MethodMan Jan 5 '12 at 18:17
  • @jpints14 what do you hash on? the string content or memory location? (or other) – Adrian Jan 5 '12 at 18:18
  • By "able to add same Quotes object multiple times" do you mean adding the exact same instance, or adding identical instances? – James Michael Hare Jan 5 '12 at 18:18
50

I'm guessing that you are creating a new Quotes with the same values. In this case they are not equal. If they should be considered equal, override the Equals and GetHashCode methods.

public class Quotes{ 
    public string symbol; 
    public string extension

    public override bool Equals(object obj)
    {
        Quotes q = obj as Quotes;
        return q != null && q.symbol == this.symbol && q.extension == this.Extension;
    }

    public override int GetHashCode()
    {
        return this.symbol.GetHashCode() ^ this.extension.GetHashCode();
    }
}
  • 18
    Note that if symbol or extension can possibly be null then the GetHashCode must handle that and not crash. – Eric Lippert Jan 5 '12 at 20:53
  • I do have a check before a comparison is ever needed, but thanks for the tip – jpints14 Jan 6 '12 at 18:28
  • 3
    Note that for field types other than strings, ints or other value types or sealed classes, you should use q != null && q.symbol.Equals(this.symbol) && q.extension.Equals(this.extension) instead of using ==, because == is not polymorphic (i.e. if subclasses define an operator ==, the base class' orperator == will still be used, whereas subclasses can override the .Equals() method, so the subclass' .Equals() will be used. Also, hash1 ^ hash2 is a poor hash implementation, since "a", "b" and "b", "a", have the same hash. Prefer something like (hash1 + 7 * 13) ^ hash2. – Georges Dupéron Sep 20 '13 at 10:02
19

I had thought that when calling values.Add(new Quotes(symb, ext)); with the same symb and ext, 'false' would be returned and the element would not be added.

This is not the case.

HashSet will use GetHashCode and Equals to determine equality of your objects. Right now, since you're not overriding these methods in Quotes, the default System.Object's reference equality will be used. Each time you add a new Quote, it's a unique object instance, so the HashSet sees it as a unique object.

If you override Object.Equals and Object.GetHashCode, it will work as you expect.

6

HashSets first compare entries based on their hash which is calculated by GetHashCode.
The default implementation returns a hashcode based on the object itself (differs between each instance).

Only if the hashes are the same (very improbable for hashes based on instances), the Equals method is called and used to definitely compare two objects.

You have to options:

  • Change Quotes to a struct
  • Override GetHashCode and Equals in Quotes

Example:

 public override int GetHashCode()
 {
    return (this.symbol == null ? 0 : this.symbol.GetHashCode())
       ^ (this.extension == null ? 0 : this.extension.GetHashCode());
 }
 public override bool Equals(object obj)
 {
    if (Object.ReferenceEquals(this, obj))
      return true;

    Quotes other = obj as Quotes;
    if (Object.ReferenceEquals(other, null))
      return false;

    return String.Equals(obj.symbol, this.symbol)
        && String.Equals(obj.extension, this.extension);
 }
  • 2
    You also need to override Object.Equals - Hashes are not guaranteed to be unique, so both methods are used... – Reed Copsey Jan 5 '12 at 18:20
  • Yeah - concentrated too much on writing the answer fast enough :-D I just added it, thanks. – Matthias Jan 5 '12 at 18:25
  • 1
    mmm - I don't think your Object.ReferenceEquals check is quite right... ;) Basically, the way you have it, any time "obj" is a Quotes object, you'll say it's not equal (which is the only way it ever could be equal...) – Reed Copsey Jan 5 '12 at 18:29
  • Argh! This happens when two ifs become one while typing... It seems like it's time for a break for me :-) – Matthias Jan 5 '12 at 18:32
  • hash1 ^ hash2 is a poor hash implementation, since "a", "b" and "b", "a", have the same hash. Consider something like (hash1 + 7 * 13) ^ hash2. – ErikE Aug 4 '15 at 2:55
4

Just wanted to fix something in Kendall's answer (can't comment for some strange reason).

return this.symbol.GetHashCode() ^ this.extension.GetHashCode();

Note that the xor function is an exceptionally collision-prone way of combining two hashes, especially when they are both of the same type (since every object where symbol == extension will hash into 0). Even when they are not of the same type or are unlikely to be equal to each other, this is bad practice, and getting used to it might cause problems in different appliances.

Instead, multiply one hash with a small prime number, and add the second, e.g:

return 3 * this.symbol.GetHashCode() + this.extension.GetHashCode();
3

I know this is kinda late, but I ran into the same issue and found an unacceptable performance hit while implementing the selected answer especially when you have a lot of records.

I found it much faster to turn this into a two step process using Hashset and Tuple and finally transforming via a Select.

public class Quotes{ 
    public string symbol; 
    public string extension
}

var values = new HashSet<Tuple<string,string>>();

values.Add(new Tuple<string,string>("A","=n"));
values.Add(new Tuple<string,string>("A","=n"));

// values.Count() == 1

values.Select (v => new Quotes{ symbol = v.Item1, extension = v.Item2 });
  • Try comparing it with an approach like the answer accepted, but also having Quotes implementing IEquatable<Quotes>, and you might get better results. Better results yet is likely possible through tweaking the GetHashCode() further. – Jon Hanna Mar 7 '15 at 1:15
2
Quotes q = new Quotes() { symbol = "GE", extension = "GElec" };
values.Add(q);
values.Add(q);

.. is adding the same instance twice, and will return false the second time.

values.Add(new Quotes() { symbol = "GE", extension = "GElec" });
values.Add(new Quotes() { symbol = "GE", extension = "GElec" });

.. is adding two different instances that happen to have the same values for public fields.

As noted elswhere, overriding Equals and GetHashCode will correct this:

public class Quotes { 
    public string symbol; 
    public string extension;

    public override bool Equals(object obj) {
        if (!(obj is Quotes)) { return false; }
        return (this.symbol == ((Quotes)obj).symbol) && 
               (this.extension == ((Quotes)obj).extension);
    }

    public override int GetHashCode() {
        return (this.symbol.GetHashCode()) ^ (this.extension.GetHashCode());
    }
} 

If you step-debug your code, you will find that values.Add calls both Quotes.Equals and Quotes.GetHashCode.

  • What does the ^ do in your return (this.symbol.GetHashCode()) ^ (this.extension.GetHashCode()); ? its my first time seeing this is this a typo? – Niklas Oct 17 '16 at 12:22

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