51

I am learning repository pattern and was reading Repository Pattern with Entity Framework 4.1 and Code First and Generic Repository Pattern - Entity Framework, ASP.NET MVC and Unit Testing Triangle about how they implement the repository pattern with Entity Framework.

Saying

•Hide EF from upper layer
•Make code better testable

Make code better testable I do understand, but why hide EF from upper layer?

Looking at their implementation, it seems just wrap the entity framework with a generic method for query the entity framework. Actually what's the reason for doing this?

I am assuming is for

  1. Loose coupling (that's why hide EF from upper layer?)
  2. Avoid repeat writting same LINQ statement for same query

Am I understand this correctly?

If I write a DataAccessLayer which is a class have methods

QueryFooObject(int id)
{
..//query foo from entity framework
} 

AddFooObject(Foo obj)
{
.. //add foo to entity framework
}
......
QueryBarObject(int id)
{
..
}

AddBarObject(Bar obj)
{
...
}

Is that also a Repository Pattern?

Explaination for dummy will be great :)

7

One thing is to increase testability and have a loose coupling to underlying persistance technology. But you will also have one repository per aggregate root object (eg. an order can be an aggregate root, which also have order lines (which are not aggregate root), to make domain object persistance more generic.

It's also makes it much easier to manage objects, because when you save an order, it will also save your child items (which can be order lines).

  • 4
    hmm, I still don't really understand why one repository per aggregate root object part. Isn't when I use entity framework to query an order object, the order will contains a list of order lines...? Sorry I am getting confuse... – King Chan Jan 5 '12 at 20:50
  • In the EF you can also save and retreive a complete aggregate root object with the ObjectContext.SaveChanges() method. But I wrote it because it's one of the advantages with the repository pattern. – Espen Burud Jan 5 '12 at 21:00
  • I see, now I understand. Thanks. – King Chan Jan 5 '12 at 21:05
  • 4
    Whoever comes across this should know that the repository pattern is an anti-pattern. Ayende explains why: youtube.com/watch?v=0tlMTJDKiug – Sam Jan 11 '13 at 14:16
  • 1
    @SamDev thank you - it's taken me hours of surfing the web to find someone who can articulate why the proliferation of repository code I keep seeing gives me an ill feeling in my stomach. – Michael12345 Dec 17 '13 at 2:45
67

I don't think you should.

The Entity Framework is already an abstraction layer over your database. The context uses the unit of work pattern and each DBSet is a repository. Adding a Repository pattern on top of this distances you from the features of your ORM.

I talked about this in my blog post: http://www.nogginbox.co.uk/blog/do-we-need-the-repository-pattern

The main reason adding your own repository implementation is so that you can use dependency injection and make your code more testable.

EF is not very testable out of the box, but it's quite easy to make a mockable version of the EF data context with an interface that can be injected.

I talked about that here: http://www.nogginbox.co.uk/blog/mocking-entity-framework-data-context

If we don't need the repository pattern to make EF testable then I don't think we need it at all.

  • 8
    I really like this sentence in your blog post: "This layer of abstraction can distance you from the features of your ORM." One might say, this "distance" is the purpose of a repository. But for many questions people ask here about repo+EF I have the feeling they start with the abstraction without knowing the concrete features well enough. Abstraction starts with concrete things, not the other way around, and you actually have to know more than one thing (not only EF) to build a meaningful abstraction. Nobody had have the idea of an animal if he only had seen a dog but never a cat. – Slauma Jun 16 '12 at 15:41
  • 1
    I agree. I've always used the repository pattern, because that's how I was taught to do it. But recently I've realised that for 90% of use cases it's just unnecessary abstraction. In my last project I simply created an interface for the dbContext class that exposes the tables, savechanges function, and any other extras I might need. – highace Sep 1 '12 at 14:08
  • 2
    The repository abstraction has another purpose. It abstracts the manner in which your data is queried/created for you. what if for example you needed your entity to be constructed from additional data other then whats in your db. The layer using the repository would not change and would not be aware of where and how the data it received was constructed. – eran otzap Oct 9 '15 at 0:54
  • 1
    I don't fully agree. EF is a very specific implementation of how you access data. Having an abstraction between your application and data access is vital. What if you decide to change ORMs or have several data sources as @eranotzap suggested? Regardless of EF not being very testable, it should not be the only reason to use an abstraction to EF. – DDiVita Mar 17 '17 at 14:29
  • 2
    @DDiVita How often would you realistically change the ORM you are using? – Blake Mumford Jun 17 '17 at 4:03
7

This picture makes it easy to understand

enter image description here

  • 1
    The db context in EF follows the Unit of Work pattern and each collection is similar to a repository. You can create a very simple wrapper around the context and still unit test. – Richard Garside Apr 4 '18 at 10:22
4

It's also an advantage to keep your queries in a central place; otherwise your queries are scattered around and are harder to maintain.

And the first point you mention: "To hide EF" is a good thing! For instance, saving logic can be hard to implement. There are multiple strategies that apply best in different scenarios. Especially when it comes to saving entities which also have changes in related entities.

Using repositories (in combination with UnitOfWork) can centralize this logic too.

Here are some videos with a nice explanation.

3

Repository systems are good for testing.

One reason being that you can use Dependency Injection.

Basically you create an interface for your repository, and you reference the interface for it when you are making the object. Then you can later make a fake object (using moq for instance) which implements that interface. Using something like ninject you can then bind the proper type to that interface. Boom you've just taken a dependence out of the equation and replaced it with something testable.

The idea is to be able to easily swap out implementations of objects for testing purposes Hope that makes sense.

0

The same reason you don't hard code file paths in your app: loose coupling and encapsulation. Imagine an app with hard coded references to "c:\windows\fonts" and the problems that can cause. You shouldn't hard code references to paths so why should you hard code references to your persistence layer? Hide your paths behind config settings (or special folders or whatever your os supports) and hide your persistence behind a repository. It will be much easier to unit test, deploy to other environments, swap implementations, and reason about your domain objects if the persistence concerns are hidden behind a repository.

0

When you are designing your repository classes to look alike domain object, to provide same data context to all the repositories and facilitating the implementation of unit of work, repository pattern makes sense. please find below some contrived example.

  class StudenRepository
  {
     dbcontext ctx;
     StundentRepository(dbcontext ctx)
     {
       this.ctx=ctx;
     }
     public void EnrollCourse(int courseId)
     {
       this.ctx.Students.Add(new Course(){CourseId=courseId});
     }
  }

  class TeacherRepository
  {
     dbcontext ctx;
     TeacherRepository(dbcontext ctx)
     {
       this.ctx=ctx;
     }
     public void EngageCourse(int courseId)
     {
       this.ctx.Teachers.Add(new Course(){CourseId=courseId});
     }
  }

  public class MyunitOfWork
  {
     dbcontext ctx;
     private StudentRepository _studentRepository;
     private TeacherRepository _teacherRepository;

     public MyunitOfWork(dbcontext ctx)
     {
       this.ctx=ctx;
     }

    public StudentRepository StundetRepository
    {
       get
       {       
             if(_studentRepository==null)
                _stundentRepository=new StundetRepository(this.ctx);

            return _stundentRepository;    
       }
    }

    public TeacherRepository TeacherRepository 
    {
       get
       {       
             if(_teacherRepository==null)
                _teacherRepository=new TeacherRepository (this.ctx);

            return _teacherRepository;    
       }
    }

    public void Commit()
    {
         this.ctx.SaveChanges();
    }
  }

//some controller method
public void Register(int courseId)
{
  using(var uw=new MyunitOfWork(new context())
  {
    uw.StudentRepository.EnrollCourse(courseId);
    uw.TeacherRepository.EngageCourse(courseId);
    uw.Commit();
  }
}
0

I know it is bad provide links in answer here, however wanted to share the video which explains various advantages of Repository Pattern when using it with Entity framework. Below is the link of youtube.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rtXpYpZdOzM

It also provides details about how to implement Repository pattern properly.

  • 1
    you don't need repository pattern in entity framework core anymore for testing, unless you want to hide ef implementation from business layer. – sensei May 20 '17 at 22:12

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