33

I need to get all the samples of a wav file into an array (or two if you need to do that to keep the stereo) so that I can apply some modifications to them. I was wondering if this is easily done (preferably without external libraries). I have no experience with reading in sound files, so I don't know much about the subject.

2
  • Why don't you want to use libraries? If it's a licensing issue, look for an LGPL or similar license. If not, well, .NET is built on libraries so that you don't have to code everything yourself. Install NuGet, get NAudio (or another audio library), and don't reinvent the wheel :). Or do it in C ;) – Pat Nov 14 '13 at 5:37
  • 6
    Why is reinventing the wheel such a bad thing? Not only will you feel good for working it out yourself, you will also learn so much in the process. If you're coding for fun and have no time restraints then I'd say definitely reinvent the wheel! – David Klempfner Mar 5 '15 at 22:54
16

WAV files (at least, uncompressed ones) are fairly straightforward. There's a header, then the data follows it.

Here's a great reference: https://ccrma.stanford.edu/courses/422/projects/WaveFormat/ (mirror)

5
  • So I can get the data in, then isolate the bytes after offset 44 and then reuse the same header to save the file, right? – annonymously Jan 6 '12 at 6:30
  • 1
    not always, WAV files can contain other chunks as well after the fmt chunk and before the data chunk. It is best to properly parse the RIFF chunks – Mark Heath Jan 6 '12 at 16:08
  • The data in the WAV file won't actually be floating point will it? Specifically, will it be a floating point representation of the actual time-domain waveform? – Ataraxia Jul 13 '12 at 15:37
  • It will be if the AudioFormat in the "fmt " subchunk is 0x0003 (WAVE_FORMAT_IEEE_FLOAT) – alldayremix Dec 18 '12 at 3:59
  • 3
    That link is a great introduction, but watch out. Many wavs today have headers longer than 44 bytes. 46-byte headers are particularly common and that introduction does not discuss the possibility of extra data to parse. – Matt J. Nov 15 '13 at 19:08
32

This code should do the trick. It converts a wave file to a normalized double array (-1 to 1), but it should be trivial to make it an int/short array instead (remove the /32768.0 bit and add 32768 instead). The right[] array will be set to null if the loaded wav file is found to be mono.

I can't claim it's completely bullet proof (potential off-by-one errors), but after creating a 65536 sample array, and creating a wave from -1 to 1, none of the samples appear to go 'through' the ceiling or floor.

// convert two bytes to one double in the range -1 to 1
static double bytesToDouble(byte firstByte, byte secondByte) {
    // convert two bytes to one short (little endian)
    short s = (secondByte << 8) | firstByte;
    // convert to range from -1 to (just below) 1
    return s / 32768.0;
}

// Returns left and right double arrays. 'right' will be null if sound is mono.
public void openWav(string filename, out double[] left, out double[] right)
{
    byte[] wav = File.ReadAllBytes(filename);

    // Determine if mono or stereo
    int channels = wav[22];     // Forget byte 23 as 99.999% of WAVs are 1 or 2 channels

    // Get past all the other sub chunks to get to the data subchunk:
    int pos = 12;   // First Subchunk ID from 12 to 16

    // Keep iterating until we find the data chunk (i.e. 64 61 74 61 ...... (i.e. 100 97 116 97 in decimal))
    while(!(wav[pos]==100 && wav[pos+1]==97 && wav[pos+2]==116 && wav[pos+3]==97)) {
        pos += 4;
        int chunkSize = wav[pos] + wav[pos + 1] * 256 + wav[pos + 2] * 65536 + wav[pos + 3] * 16777216;
        pos += 4 + chunkSize;
    }
    pos += 8;

    // Pos is now positioned to start of actual sound data.
    int samples = (wav.Length - pos)/2;     // 2 bytes per sample (16 bit sound mono)
    if (channels == 2) samples /= 2;        // 4 bytes per sample (16 bit stereo)

    // Allocate memory (right will be null if only mono sound)
    left = new double[samples];
    if (channels == 2) right = new double[samples];
    else right = null;

    // Write to double array/s:
    int i=0;
    while (pos < length) {
        left[i] = bytesToDouble(wav[pos], wav[pos + 1]);
        pos += 2;
        if (channels == 2) {
            right[i] = bytesToDouble(wav[pos], wav[pos + 1]);
            pos += 2;
        }
        i++;
    }
}
9
  • Someone correct me if i am wrong. You can't do (secondByte << 8) to an 8bit type like byte. byte is an 8-bit signed integer and cannot be bitshifted it by 8 because there is no space to push those 8 bits. – Martin Berger Jun 19 '13 at 16:52
  • 1
    @MartinBerger Bytes are auto-promoted to int in most cases, including shifting. – Clément Jan 14 '14 at 18:01
  • @Clément So during shifting, variable is promoted to platform-specifc int, which usually is 32 bits? Didn't know that, thanks. – Martin Berger Jan 15 '14 at 15:10
  • 2
    @MartinBerger yes, see msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/aa691330(v=vs.71).aspx and in particular the last rule: Otherwise, both operands are converted to type int.. – Clément Jan 15 '14 at 23:47
  • @MartinBerger FYI there is no such thing as "platform specific int". C#'s int (which maps to the Int32 struct in .NET) is ALWAYS 32 bits. – David Klempfner Mar 4 '15 at 1:33
28

Assuming your WAV file contains 16 bit PCM (which is the most common), you can use NAudio to read it out into a byte array, and then copy that into an array of 16 bit integers for convenience. If it is stereo, the samples will be interleaved left, right.

using (WaveFileReader reader = new WaveFileReader("myfile.wav"))
{
    Assert.AreEqual(16, reader.WaveFormat.BitsPerSample, "Only works with 16 bit audio");
    byte[] buffer = new byte[reader.Length];
    int read = reader.Read(buffer, 0, buffer.Length);
    short[] sampleBuffer = new short[read / 2];
    Buffer.BlockCopy(buffer, 0, sampleBuffer, 0, read);
}

I know you wanted to avoid third party libraries, but if you want to be sure to cope with WAV files with extra chunks, I suggest avoiding approaches like just seeking 44 bytes into the file.

0
18

At time of writing nobody has addressed 32-bit or 64-bit encoded WAVs.

The following code handles 16/32/64 bit and mono/stereo:

static bool readWav( string filename, out float[] L, out float[] R )
{
    L = R = null;

    try {
        using (FileStream fs = File.Open(filename,FileMode.Open))
        {
            BinaryReader reader = new BinaryReader(fs);

            // chunk 0
            int chunkID       = reader.ReadInt32();
            int fileSize      = reader.ReadInt32();
            int riffType      = reader.ReadInt32();


            // chunk 1
            int fmtID         = reader.ReadInt32();
            int fmtSize       = reader.ReadInt32(); // bytes for this chunk (expect 16 or 18)

            // 16 bytes coming...
            int fmtCode       = reader.ReadInt16();
            int channels      = reader.ReadInt16();
            int sampleRate    = reader.ReadInt32();
            int byteRate      = reader.ReadInt32();
            int fmtBlockAlign = reader.ReadInt16();
            int bitDepth      = reader.ReadInt16();

            if (fmtSize == 18)
            {
                // Read any extra values
                int fmtExtraSize = reader.ReadInt16();
                reader.ReadBytes(fmtExtraSize);
            }

            // chunk 2
            int dataID = reader.ReadInt32();
            int bytes = reader.ReadInt32();

            // DATA!
            byte[] byteArray = reader.ReadBytes(bytes);

            int bytesForSamp = bitDepth/8;
            int nValues = bytes / bytesForSamp;


            float[] asFloat = null;
            switch( bitDepth ) {
                case 64:
                    double[] 
                        asDouble = new double[nValues];  
                    Buffer.BlockCopy(byteArray, 0, asDouble, 0, bytes);
                    asFloat = Array.ConvertAll( asDouble, e => (float)e );
                    break;
                case 32:
                    asFloat = new float[nValues];   
                    Buffer.BlockCopy(byteArray, 0, asFloat, 0, bytes);
                    break;
                case 16:
                    Int16 [] 
                        asInt16 = new Int16[nValues];   
                    Buffer.BlockCopy(byteArray, 0, asInt16, 0, bytes);
                    asFloat = Array.ConvertAll( asInt16, e => e / (float)(Int16.MaxValue+1) );
                    break;
                default:
                    return false;
            }

            switch( channels ) {
            case 1:
                L = asFloat;
                R = null;
                return true;
            case 2:
                // de-interleave
                int nSamps = nValues / 2;
                L = new float[nSamps];
                R = new float[nSamps];
                for( int s=0, v=0; s<nSamps; s++ ) {
                    L[s] = asFloat[v++];
                    R[s] = asFloat[v++];
                }
                return true;
            default:
                return false;
            }
        }
    }
    catch {
            Debug.Log( "...Failed to load: " + filename );
            return false;
    }

    return false;
}
6
  • 2
    Shouldn't L and R be of Length (samps / 2), since asFloat is of size samps? – Francisco Aguilera Feb 17 '16 at 9:36
  • oo I think you're right. Also I should be using Float32 and Float64 rather than float and double. – P i Feb 18 '16 at 11:13
  • I think float and double are right. C# does not have Float32 and Float64 rather System.Single and System.Double. Anyways, thanks for the code, it helped me fix an annoying error on mine. – Francisco Aguilera Feb 18 '16 at 13:09
  • 1
    Great! -- Read this answer along with this article to understand better what's gong on: soundfile.sapp.org/doc/WaveFormat – Daniel Möller Jul 22 '16 at 16:33
  • the inner loop of case 2 will loop i =0 to i = samps, s++ will execute 2x sample times. but asFloat is size of samps. Array out of bound guaranteed. I think it should be i<samps/2; – Steve Dec 19 '17 at 21:37
3

http://hourlyapps.blogspot.com/2008/07/open-source-wave-graph-c-net-control.html
Here is a Control which Display's the Spectrum of a Wav file ,which also Serves a Byte[] of Decoded Wav File where you can play and/or Change their Values .

Just download the Control and it's pretty good for WAV File manipulation.

2

To get the wav file into an array you can just do this:

byte[] data = File.ReadAllBytes("FilePath");

but like Fletch said you need to isolate the data from the headers. It should be just a simple offset.

2

Try Play audio data from array

PlayerEx pl = new PlayerEx();

private static void PlayArray(PlayerEx pl)
{
    double fs = 8000; // sample freq
    double freq = 1000; // desired tone
    short[] mySound = new short[4000];
    for (int i = 0; i < 4000; i++)
    {
        double t = (double)i / fs; // current time
        mySound[i] = (short)(Math.Cos(t * freq) * (short.MaxValue));
    }
    IntPtr format = AudioCompressionManager.GetPcmFormat(1, 16, (int)fs);
    pl.OpenPlayer(format);
    byte[] mySoundByte = new byte[mySound.Length * 2];
    Buffer.BlockCopy(mySound, 0, mySoundByte, 0, mySoundByte.Length);
    pl.AddData(mySoundByte);
    pl.StartPlay();
}

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