21

I have a bash script that I want to be quiet when run without attached tty (like from cron). I now was looking for a way to conditionally redirect output to /dev/null in a single line. This is an example of what I had in mind, but I will have many more commands that do output in the script

#!/bin/bash
# conditional-redirect.sh
if tty -s; then 
  REDIRECT=
else 
  REDIRECT=">& /dev/null"
fi
echo "is this visible?" $REDIRECT

Unfortunately, this does not work:

$ ./conditional-redirect.sh
is this visible?
$ echo "" | ./conditional-redirect.sh 
is this visible? >& /dev/null

what I don't want to do is duplicate all commands in a with-redirection or with-no-redirection variant:

if tty -s; then 
  echo "is this visible?"
else 
  echo "is this visible?" >& /dev/null
fi

EDIT:

It would be great if the solution would provide me a way to output something in "quiet" mode, e.g. when something is really wrong, I might want to get a notice from cron.

25

For bash, you can use the line:

exec &>/dev/null

This will direct all stdout and stderr to /dev/null from that point on. It uses the non-argument version of exec.

Normally, something like exec xyzzy would replace the program in the current process with a new program but you can use this non-argument version to simply modify redirections while keeping the current program.

So, in your specific case, you could use something like:

tty -s
if [[ $? -eq 1 ]] ; then
    exec &>/dev/null
fi

If you want the majority of output to be discarded but still want to output some stuff, you can create a new file handle to do that. Something like:

tty -s
if [[ $? -eq 1 ]] ; then
  exec 3>&1 &>/dev/null
else 
  exec 3>&1
fi
echo Normal               # won't see this.
echo Failure >&3          # will see this.
  • 1
    Yes, that works! (Or even simpler exec &> /dev/null) – daniel kullmann Jan 6 '12 at 10:42
  • ..but it has the downside that all output is lost in "quiet" mode; there might be situations where I actually want to output something, even in queit mode; see upodated question. – daniel kullmann Jan 6 '12 at 10:48
  • Good point, @daniel, I'm getting a bit long in the tooth and old habits die hard but I've updated answer using your preferred way. – paxdiablo Jan 6 '12 at 10:48
  • Aahh, I can redirect to /dev/tty in that case! – daniel kullmann Jan 6 '12 at 10:49
  • 2
    @theartofrain: you ask another question on SO. That way, everyone sees it rather than just me, and you have more chance of getting a good range of answers. FWIW, you can store the current handles: exec 8>&1 9>&2 &>/dev/null and then later do exec 1>&8 2>&9 to restore. – paxdiablo Dec 18 '14 at 3:21
5

I found another solution, but I feel it is clumsy, compared to paxdiablo's answer:

if tty -s; then 
  REDIRECT=/dev/tty
else 
  REDIRECT=/dev/null
fi
echo "Normal output" &> $REDIRECT
  • 2
    That will work but only if the output isn't redirected. /dev/tty always refers to your terminal device so, if you've run your script with myscript >xyzzy.log, the output you send to /dev/tty won't end up in that log file. That may not matter though it depends on how you want to use your program. – paxdiablo Jan 6 '12 at 10:58
2

You can use a function:

function the_code {
    echo "is this visible?"
    # as many code lines as you want
}

if tty -s; then # or other condition
  the_code
else 
  the_code >& /dev/null
fi

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