275

I'm unable to find file.ReadLine function in Go. I can figure out how to quickly write one, but just wondering if I'm overlooking something here. How does one read a file line by line?

  • 7
    As of Go1.1, bufio.Scanner is the best way to do this. – Malcolm Oct 17 '13 at 15:02

12 Answers 12

114

There is function ReadLine in package bufio.

Please note that if the line does not fit into the read buffer, the function will return an incomplete line. If you want to always read a whole line in your program by a single call to a function, you will need to encapsulate the ReadLine function into your own function which calls ReadLine in a for-loop.

bufio.ReadString('\n') isn't fully equivalent to ReadLine because ReadString is unable to handle the case when the last line of a file does not end with the newline character.

  • 32
    From the docs: "ReadLine is a low-level line-reading primitive. Most callers should use ReadBytes('\n') or ReadString('\n') instead or use a Scanner." – mdwhatcott Mar 18 '14 at 23:20
  • 12
    @mdwhatcott why does it matter that its a " low-level line-reading primitive"? How does that reach to the conclusion that "Most callers should use ReadBytes('\n') or ReadString('\n') instead or use a Scanner."? – Charlie Parker Aug 17 '14 at 21:56
  • 10
    @CharlieParker - Not sure, just quoting the docs to add context. – mdwhatcott Aug 18 '14 at 21:40
  • I was wondering, is it really true that it can return a string not up to "\n"? It makes sense, but I have not been able to "force" it to do so. I will try again... – Charlie Parker Aug 20 '14 at 3:07
  • 8
    From the same docs.. "If ReadString encounters an error before finding a delimiter, it returns the data read before the error and the error itself (often io.EOF)." So you can just check for io.EOF error and know your are done. – eduncan911 Oct 18 '14 at 22:44
512

In Go 1.1 and newer the most simple way to do this is with a bufio.Scanner. Here is a simple example that reads lines from a file:

package main

import (
    "bufio"
    "fmt"
    "log"
    "os"
)

func main() {
    file, err := os.Open("/path/to/file.txt")
    if err != nil {
        log.Fatal(err)
    }
    defer file.Close()

    scanner := bufio.NewScanner(file)
    for scanner.Scan() {
        fmt.Println(scanner.Text())
    }

    if err := scanner.Err(); err != nil {
        log.Fatal(err)
    }
}

This is the cleanest way to read from a Reader line by line.

There is one caveat: Scanner does not deal well with lines longer than 65536 characters. If that is an issue for you then then you should probably roll your own on top of Reader.Read().

  • 38
    And since the OP asked to scan over a file, it would be trivial to first file, _ := os.Open("/path/to/file.csv") and then scan over the file handle: scanner := bufio.NewScanner(file) – Evan Plumlee Aug 18 '13 at 13:28
  • 13
    Don't forget to defer file.Close(). – Kiril Aug 8 '14 at 7:10
  • 10
    Problem is Scanner.Scan() is limited in a 4096 []byte buffer size per line. You will get bufio.ErrTooLong error, which is bufio.Scanner: token too long if the line is too long. In which case, you'll have to use bufio.ReaderLine() or ReadString(). – eduncan911 Oct 21 '14 at 14:49
  • 4
    Just my $0.02 - this is the most correct answer on the page :) – sethvargo Nov 23 '14 at 20:45
  • 4
    The problem with this is that CSV files can have newlines in their columns that do not indicate the end of a row. If you're reading CSV files, you should use the go CSV package – Christopher Davies Aug 6 '15 at 1:09
69

Use:

  • reader.ReadString('\n')
    • If you don't mind that the line could be very long (i.e. use a lot of RAM). It keeps the \n at the end of the string returned.
  • reader.ReadLine()
    • If you care about limiting RAM consumption and don't mind the extra work of handling the case where the line is greater than the reader's buffer size.

I tested the various solutions suggested by writing a program to test the scenarios which are identified as problems in other answers:

  • A file with a 4MB line.
  • A file which doesn't end with a line break.

I found that:

  • The Scanner solution does not handle long lines.
  • The ReadLine solution is complex to implement.
  • The ReadString solution is the simplest and works for long lines.

Here is code which demonstrates each solution, it can be run via go run main.go:

package main

import (
    "bufio"
    "bytes"
    "fmt"
    "io"
    "os"
)

func readFileWithReadString(fn string) (err error) {
    fmt.Println("readFileWithReadString")

    file, err := os.Open(fn)
    defer file.Close()

    if err != nil {
        return err
    }

    // Start reading from the file with a reader.
    reader := bufio.NewReader(file)

    var line string
    for {
        line, err = reader.ReadString('\n')

        fmt.Printf(" > Read %d characters\n", len(line))

        // Process the line here.
        fmt.Println(" > > " + limitLength(line, 50))

        if err != nil {
            break
        }
    }

    if err != io.EOF {
        fmt.Printf(" > Failed!: %v\n", err)
    }

    return
}

func readFileWithScanner(fn string) (err error) {
    fmt.Println("readFileWithScanner - this will fail!")

    // Don't use this, it doesn't work with long lines...

    file, err := os.Open(fn)
    defer file.Close()

    if err != nil {
        return err
    }

    // Start reading from the file using a scanner.
    scanner := bufio.NewScanner(file)

    for scanner.Scan() {
        line := scanner.Text()

        fmt.Printf(" > Read %d characters\n", len(line))

        // Process the line here.
        fmt.Println(" > > " + limitLength(line, 50))
    }

    if scanner.Err() != nil {
        fmt.Printf(" > Failed!: %v\n", scanner.Err())
    }

    return
}

func readFileWithReadLine(fn string) (err error) {
    fmt.Println("readFileWithReadLine")

    file, err := os.Open(fn)
    defer file.Close()

    if err != nil {
        return err
    }

    // Start reading from the file with a reader.
    reader := bufio.NewReader(file)

    for {
        var buffer bytes.Buffer

        var l []byte
        var isPrefix bool
        for {
            l, isPrefix, err = reader.ReadLine()
            buffer.Write(l)

            // If we've reached the end of the line, stop reading.
            if !isPrefix {
                break
            }

            // If we're just at the EOF, break
            if err != nil {
                break
            }
        }

        if err == io.EOF {
            break
        }

        line := buffer.String()

        fmt.Printf(" > Read %d characters\n", len(line))

        // Process the line here.
        fmt.Println(" > > " + limitLength(line, 50))
    }

    if err != io.EOF {
        fmt.Printf(" > Failed!: %v\n", err)
    }

    return
}

func main() {
    testLongLines()
    testLinesThatDoNotFinishWithALinebreak()
}

func testLongLines() {
    fmt.Println("Long lines")
    fmt.Println()

    createFileWithLongLine("longline.txt")
    readFileWithReadString("longline.txt")
    fmt.Println()
    readFileWithScanner("longline.txt")
    fmt.Println()
    readFileWithReadLine("longline.txt")
    fmt.Println()
}

func testLinesThatDoNotFinishWithALinebreak() {
    fmt.Println("No linebreak")
    fmt.Println()

    createFileThatDoesNotEndWithALineBreak("nolinebreak.txt")
    readFileWithReadString("nolinebreak.txt")
    fmt.Println()
    readFileWithScanner("nolinebreak.txt")
    fmt.Println()
    readFileWithReadLine("nolinebreak.txt")
    fmt.Println()
}

func createFileThatDoesNotEndWithALineBreak(fn string) (err error) {
    file, err := os.Create(fn)
    defer file.Close()

    if err != nil {
        return err
    }

    w := bufio.NewWriter(file)
    w.WriteString("Does not end with linebreak.")
    w.Flush()

    return
}

func createFileWithLongLine(fn string) (err error) {
    file, err := os.Create(fn)
    defer file.Close()

    if err != nil {
        return err
    }

    w := bufio.NewWriter(file)

    fs := 1024 * 1024 * 4 // 4MB

    // Create a 4MB long line consisting of the letter a.
    for i := 0; i < fs; i++ {
        w.WriteRune('a')
    }

    // Terminate the line with a break.
    w.WriteRune('\n')

    // Put in a second line, which doesn't have a linebreak.
    w.WriteString("Second line.")

    w.Flush()

    return
}

func limitLength(s string, length int) string {
    if len(s) < length {
        return s
    }

    return s[:length]
}

I tested on:

  • go version go1.7 windows/amd64
  • go version go1.6.3 linux/amd64
  • go version go1.7.4 darwin/amd64

The test program outputs:

Long lines

readFileWithReadString
 > Read 4194305 characters
 > > aaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaa
 > Read 12 characters
 > > Second line.

readFileWithScanner - this will fail!
 > Failed!: bufio.Scanner: token too long

readFileWithReadLine
 > Read 4194304 characters
 > > aaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaa
 > Read 12 characters
 > > Second line.

No linebreak

readFileWithReadString
 > Read 28 characters
 > > Does not end with linebreak.

readFileWithScanner - this will fail!
 > Read 28 characters
 > > Does not end with linebreak.

readFileWithReadLine
 > Read 28 characters
 > > Does not end with linebreak.
  • 6
    The defer file.Close() should be after the error check; otherwise on error it will panic. – mlg Jul 22 '17 at 5:37
  • Scanner solution does handle the long lines if you configure it like so. See: golang.org/pkg/bufio/#Scanner.Buffer – Inanc Gumus Mar 25 at 14:21
  • You should check the error properly as seen in the docs: play.golang.org/p/5CCPzVTSj6 i.e. if err == io.EOF {break} else {return err} – Chuque Jun 16 at 13:42
51

EDIT: As of go1.1, the idiomatic solution is to use bufio.Scanner

I wrote up a way to easily read each line from a file. The Readln(*bufio.Reader) function returns a line (sans \n) from the underlying bufio.Reader struct.

// Readln returns a single line (without the ending \n)
// from the input buffered reader.
// An error is returned iff there is an error with the
// buffered reader.
func Readln(r *bufio.Reader) (string, error) {
  var (isPrefix bool = true
       err error = nil
       line, ln []byte
      )
  for isPrefix && err == nil {
      line, isPrefix, err = r.ReadLine()
      ln = append(ln, line...)
  }
  return string(ln),err
}

You can use Readln to read every line from a file. The following code reads every line in a file and outputs each line to stdout.

f, err := os.Open(fi)
if err != nil {
    fmt.Printf("error opening file: %v\n",err)
    os.Exit(1)
}
r := bufio.NewReader(f)
s, e := Readln(r)
for e == nil {
    fmt.Println(s)
    s,e = Readln(r)
}

Cheers!

  • 14
    I wrote this answer before Go 1.1 came out. Go 1.1 has a Scanner package in the stdlib. that provides the same functionality as my answer. I would recommend using Scanner instead of my answer since Scanner is in the stdlib. Happy hacking! :-) – Malcolm Jul 9 '13 at 15:57
23

There two common way to read file line by line.

  1. Use bufio.Scanner
  2. Use ReadString/ReadBytes/... in bufio.Reader

In my testcase, ~250MB, ~2,500,000 lines, bufio.Scanner(time used: 0.395491384s) is faster than bufio.Reader.ReadString(time_used: 0.446867622s).

Source code: https://github.com/xpzouying/go-practice/tree/master/read_file_line_by_line

Read file use bufio.Scanner,

func scanFile() {
    f, err := os.OpenFile(logfile, os.O_RDONLY, os.ModePerm)
    if err != nil {
        log.Fatalf("open file error: %v", err)
        return
    }
    defer f.Close()

    sc := bufio.NewScanner(f)
    for sc.Scan() {
        _ = sc.Text()  // GET the line string
    }
    if err := sc.Err(); err != nil {
        log.Fatalf("scan file error: %v", err)
        return
    }
}

Read file use bufio.Reader,

func readFileLines() {
    f, err := os.OpenFile(logfile, os.O_RDONLY, os.ModePerm)
    if err != nil {
        log.Fatalf("open file error: %v", err)
        return
    }
    defer f.Close()

    rd := bufio.NewReader(f)
    for {
        line, err := rd.ReadString('\n')
        if err != nil {
            if err == io.EOF {
                break
            }

            log.Fatalf("read file line error: %v", err)
            return
        }
        _ = line  // GET the line string
    }
}
  • Be aware that this bufio.Reader example will not read the last line in a file if it does not end with a newline. ReadString will return both the last line and io.EOF in this case. – konrad Nov 26 '18 at 13:10
10

You can also use ReadString with \n as a separator:

  f, err := os.Open(filename)
  if err != nil {
    fmt.Println("error opening file ", err)
    os.Exit(1)
  }
  defer f.Close()
  r := bufio.NewReader(f)
  for {
    path, err := r.ReadString(10) // 0x0A separator = newline
    if err == io.EOF {
      // do something here
      break
    } else if err != nil {
      return err // if you return error
    }
  }
7

Example from this gist

func readLine(path string) {
  inFile, err := os.Open(path)
  if err != nil {
     fmt.Println(err.Error() + `: ` + path)
     return
  }
  defer inFile.Close()

  scanner := bufio.NewScanner(inFile)
  for scanner.Scan() {
    fmt.Println(scanner.Text()) // the line
  }
}

but this gives an error when there is a line that larger than Scanner's buffer.

When that happened, what I do is use reader := bufio.NewReader(inFile) create and concat my own buffer either using ch, err := reader.ReadByte() or len, err := reader.Read(myBuffer)

  • care to explain why -1? – Kokizzu Feb 25 '15 at 3:32
  • I think it;s a little bit overcomplicated this solution, don't you ? – Decebal Apr 18 '16 at 8:55
4

bufio.Reader.ReadLine() works well. But if you want to read each line by a string, try to use ReadString('\n'). It doesn't need to reinvent the wheel.

3
// strip '\n' or read until EOF, return error if read error  
func readline(reader io.Reader) (line []byte, err error) {   
    line = make([]byte, 0, 100)                              
    for {                                                    
        b := make([]byte, 1)                                 
        n, er := reader.Read(b)                              
        if n > 0 {                                           
            c := b[0]                                        
            if c == '\n' { // end of line                    
                break                                        
            }                                                
            line = append(line, c)                           
        }                                                    
        if er != nil {                                       
            err = er                                         
            return                                           
        }                                                    
    }                                                        
    return                                                   
}                                    
1

In the code bellow, I read the interests from the CLI until the user hits enter and I'm using Readline:

interests := make([]string, 1)
r := bufio.NewReader(os.Stdin)
for true {
    fmt.Print("Give me an interest:")
    t, _, _ := r.ReadLine()
    interests = append(interests, string(t))
    if len(t) == 0 {
        break;
    }
}
fmt.Println(interests)
1
import (
     "bufio"
     "os"
)

var (
    reader = bufio.NewReader(os.Stdin)
)

func ReadFromStdin() string{
    result, _ := reader.ReadString('\n')
    witl := result[:len(result)-1]
    return witl
}

Here is an example with function ReadFromStdin() it's like fmt.Scan(&name) but its takes all strings with blank spaces like: "Hello My Name Is ..."

var name string = ReadFromStdin()

println(name)
0

I like Lzap solution, I am new in Go, I woud like to ask to lzap but I could not do it I have not 50 points yet.. I change a little your solution and complete the code...

package main

import (
    "bufio"
    "fmt"
    "io"
    "os"
)

func main() {
    f, err := os.Open("archiveName")
    if err != nil {
        fmt.Println(err)
        os.Exit(1)
    }
    defer f.Close()
    r := bufio.NewReader(f)
    line, err := r.ReadString(10)    // line defined once 
    for err != io.EOF {
        fmt.Print(line)              // or any stuff
        line, err = r.ReadString(10) //  line was defined before
    }
}

I am not sure why I need to test 'err' again, but in anyway we can do it. But, the main question is.. why Go do not produce error with the sentence => line, err := r.ReadString(10), inside the loop ? It is defined again and again each time the loop is executed. I avoid that situation with my change, any comment? I set the condition EOF in the 'for' as similar to a While too. Thanks

protected by icza Mar 23 '18 at 8:44

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