1

I am having a file where component Baseline and component names where stored as follows

(Mailcomp@\My_PVOB) BL_2.1.0.9.5179@\My_PVOB
(OfficeComp@\My_PVOB) BL_2.1.0.17.6972@\MY_PVOB

Actually i need to Construct a hash table which may have entries like

@(Key=Mailcomp,Value=BL_2.1.0.9.5179)
@(Key=OfficeComp, Value=BL_2.1.0.17.6972)

I was trying to replace like follows

(Get-Content $BaselineFile) | foreach{ $_ -replace "@\My_PVOB[?]",''} | Out-File  $BaselineFile

Then i tried to Create hash table , but the first command itself failed and i don't know how to create hash table from file entries. Can some one help me please?

2

At the time of writing there are two answers (one from Shay Levy and one from jon Z) that are both close, but neither is quite right--despite the fact that Shay's answer has already been accepted (!). Here's why:

Issues with Shay's code

Shay's answer is too literal, based on an inaccurately stated requirement that specifies creating a "hash table which may have entries like" this:

@(Key=Mailcomp,Value=BL_2.1.0.9.5179)
@(Key=OfficeComp, Value=BL_2.1.0.17.6972)

But if one is going to use PowerShell syntax, that is stated incorrectly. The requirement in reality should look like this:

@{Mailcomp=BL_2.1.0.9.5179}
@{OfficeComp=BL_2.1.0.17.6972}

That is to say, the first line specifies a hash key of Mailcomp and a hash value of BL_2.1.0.9.5179. This modified version of Shay's code delivers precisely that:

$hash = @{}
Get-Content $BaselineFile | 
Foreach-Object {
    if ($_ -match '^\(([^@]+).+\)\s([^@]+)')
    {
        $hash[$matches[1]]=$matches[2]
    }
}

Here's the output:

Name       Value
----       -----
Mailcomp   BL_2.1.0.9.5179
OfficeComp BL_2.1.0.17.6972

This is much easier to work with, as I can now access $hash["Mailcomp"] or $hash["OfficeComp"] to retrieve their respective values.

A second problem with Shay's code is the hash entry creation itself (@{ key=$matches[1]; value=$matches[2] }). That statement creates a separate "mini" hashtable for each iteration (i.e. each line of the input). It only seems to produce reasonable output because of the amalgamation of the implicit Write-Output in his code. To prove this--and to compare apples to apples--take my code above and replace the conditional with this equivalent to Shay's code:

    if ($_ -match '^\(([^@]+).+\)\s([^@]+)')
    {
        @{ $matches[1]=$matches[2] }
    }

You will find that $hash["Mailcomp"] does not return the expected BL_2.1.0.9.5179.

Issues with Jon's code

I like jon Z's answer; I really do. Really. But it reminds me of the great old joke with the punchline assume we have a can opener... It is a very good solution if and only if the input is amenable to a simple delimiter. Not the case here--a regular expression (or other mechanism) is required to massage the input. In all fairness, Jon notes that explicitly by stating he is assuming some preprocessing. `Nuff said.

1
  • I'll verify and do the necessary modification in accepting the best answer – Samselvaprabu Jan 10 '12 at 3:13
2

Assuming your $baselinefile looks like this after preprocessing:

Mailcomp BL_2.1.0.9.5179
OfficeComp BL_2.1.0.17.6972

this should work:

$hash = @{}
Import-Csv $BaseLineFile -header "first", "second" -delimiter " " | ForEach-Object { $hash[$_.first] = $_.second}
$hash
0
2

Give this a try:

Get-Content $BaselineFile | Foreach-Object { 
    if($_ -match '^\(([^@]+).+\)\s([^@]+)')
    {
        @{
            key=$matches[1]
            value=$matches[2]   
        }
    }
}

Name    Value
----    -----
value   BL_2.1.0.9.5179
key     Mailcomp
value   BL_2.1.0.17.6972
key     OfficeComp

Or

Get-Content $BaselineFile | Foreach-Object { 

    $value = ($_ -replace '@\\My_PVOB|\(|\)').split()

    @{
        key=$value[0]
        value=$value[1] 
    }
}

UPDATE: Create one hash table, hash key is made of the first match and its value is the second match:

$ht = @{}

Get-Content $BaselineFile | Foreach-Object {     

    if($_ -match '^\(([^@]+).+\)\s([^@]+)')
    {        
            $ht[$matches[1]] = $matches[2]     
    }    
}

$ht

Name       Value           
----       -----           
Mailcomp   BL_2.1.0.9.5179 
OfficeComp BL_2.1.0.17.6972
4
  • Again Levy's easy to understand answers are rocking. It works buddy and also understandable – Samselvaprabu Jan 6 '12 at 12:27
  • This is unnamed hash. How to store this in named hash? So that i can process each value in hash and do one more operation – Samselvaprabu Jan 6 '12 at 12:50
  • You can assign the result to a variable and process each one by using its collection index. like: $h = gc... and then $h[0].key etc – Shay Levy Jan 6 '12 at 13:17
  • Buddy , As "msorens" mentions, Is your code has issue? I have used replace method from your code and remaining things i am using from JonZ and i am not sure about this theory – Samselvaprabu Jan 10 '12 at 7:36

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