I'm writing a program in C# that needs to repeatedly access 1 image file. Most of the time it works, but if my computer's running fast, it will try to access the file before it's been saved back to the filesystem and throw an error: "File in use by another process".

I would like to find a way around this, but all my Googling has only yielded creating checks by using exception handling. This is against my religion, so I was wondering if anyone has a better way of doing it?

  • 24
    All right, you can test it by examining all the open handles on the system. However, since Windows is a multitasking operating system, there is a chance that right after you run the code to determine if the file is open and you deem it is not, a process code start using that file, then by the time you try to use it, you receive an error. But, there is nothing wrong with checking first; just don't assume it is not in use when you actually need it. – BobbyShaftoe May 18 '09 at 6:45
  • 3
    But just for this specific issue; I'd recommend not examining the file handles and just try some preset number of times, say 3-5 before failing. – BobbyShaftoe May 18 '09 at 6:46
  • How is this image file generated? Can you stop/sleep/pause your program until the generation is completed? That is by far a superior way to handle the situation. If not, then I don't think you can avoid using exception handling. – Catchwa May 18 '09 at 6:48
  • This is a duplicate of stackoverflow.com/questions/1304/… – Ignacio Soler Garcia Nov 10 '11 at 13:34
  • 16
    Your philosophy has a bad understanding of exceptions. Most people think exceptions means holy-crap-out-of-doom-something's-wrong-die-die-die. When exception means.... exception. It means something exceptional occurred that you need to "handle" (or account for). Maybe you want to keep retrying for data access, maybe the user needs to know that you can't get a connection. What do you do? You handle the ConnectionFailedException and notify the user, so maybe, they'll stop trying after an hour, and notice the cable is unplugged. – Lee Louviere Mar 11 '13 at 15:28

16 Answers 16

up vote 459 down vote accepted

Updated NOTE on this solution: Checking with FileAccess.ReadWrite will fail for Read-Only files so the solution has been modified to check with FileAccess.Read. While this solution works because trying to check with FileAccess.Read will fail if the file has a Write or Read lock on it, however, this solution will not work if the file doesn't have a Write or Read lock on it, i.e. it has been opened (for reading or writing) with FileShare.Read or FileShare.Write access.

ORIGINAL: I've used this code for the past several years, and I haven't had any issues with it.

Understand your hesitation about using exceptions, but you can't avoid them all of the time:

protected virtual bool IsFileLocked(FileInfo file)
{
    FileStream stream = null;

    try
    {
        stream = file.Open(FileMode.Open, FileAccess.Read, FileShare.None);
    }
    catch (IOException)
    {
        //the file is unavailable because it is:
        //still being written to
        //or being processed by another thread
        //or does not exist (has already been processed)
        return true;
    }
    finally
    {
        if (stream != null)
            stream.Close();
    }

    //file is not locked
    return false;
}
  • 55
    This is a great solution, but I have one comment - you may wan't to open the File with access mode FileAccess.Read since ReadWrite will always fail if the file happens to be read-only. – adeel825 Jan 29 '10 at 1:28
  • 195
    -1. This is a poor answer, because the file could become locked by another thread/process after it is closed in IsFileLocked, and before your thread gets a chance to open it. – Polyfun May 26 '10 at 15:58
  • 14
    I think this is a great answer. I'm using this as an extension method á la public static bool IsLocked(this FileInfo file) {/*...*/}. – Manuzor Jul 4 '12 at 11:06
  • 47
    @ChrisW: you might be wondering what is going on. Do not be alarmed. You're just being subject to the wrath of the Daily WTF community: thedailywtf.com/Comments/… – Pierre Lebeaupin Mar 11 '13 at 13:15
  • 11
    @ChrisW Why is that a bad thing. This community is here to point out good and bad answers. If a bunch of professionals notice this is a bad thing, and join to downvote, then the site is WAI. And before you get negative, if you read that article, they say to "upvote the right answer" not downvote the wrong one. Do you want them to explain their upvotes in comments as well. Thanks for introducing me to another good site! – Lee Louviere Mar 11 '13 at 15:12

You can suffer from a thread race condition on this which there are documented examples of this being used as a security vulnerability. If you check that the file is available, but then try and use it you could throw at that point, which a malicious user could use to force and exploit in your code.

Your best bet is a try catch / finally which tries to get the file handle.

try
{
   using (Stream stream = new FileStream("MyFilename.txt", FileMode.Open))
   {
        // File/Stream manipulating code here
   }
} catch {
  //check here why it failed and ask user to retry if the file is in use.
}
  • 105
    +1. There is no 100% safe way to "learn if a file is in use" because milliseconds after you do the check, the file may not be in use anymore, or vice versa. Instead, you just open the file and use it if there are no exceptions. – Sedat Kapanoglu Jan 4 '11 at 7:16
  • 8
    Too bad .NET doesn't support CAS. Something like, TryOpenFile(Ref FileHandle) that returns success/failure. There should always be a work-around not rely on exception handling alone. I wonder how Microsoft Office does it. – TamusJRoyce Jul 31 '11 at 22:37
  • 2
    The key thing to understand here is that this API is simply using the windows API to get a file handle. As such they need to translate the error code received from the C API and wrap it to an exception to throw. We have exception handling in .Net so why not use it. That way you can write a clean forward path in your code and leave the error handling in a separate code path. – Spence Aug 1 '11 at 23:52
  • 33
    The using statement is to ensure the stream is closed after I'm done. I think you'll find that the using() {} is less characters than try {} finally { obj.Dispose() }. You'll also find that you now need to declare your object reference outside the using statement, which is more typing. If you have a explicit interface you'd also have to cast. Finally you want to dispose ASAP, and the finally logic may have UI or any other long running actions that have little to do with calling IDispose. </rant> – Spence Nov 27 '12 at 20:01
  • 2
    that doesn't negate the fact that you have to declare your object outside the try and have to explicitly call dispose, which using does for you and means the same thing. – Spence Jan 31 '13 at 0:27

Use this to check if a file is locked:

using System.IO;
using System.Runtime.InteropServices;
internal static class Helper
{
const int ERROR_SHARING_VIOLATION = 32;
const int ERROR_LOCK_VIOLATION = 33;

private static bool IsFileLocked(Exception exception)
{
    int errorCode = Marshal.GetHRForException(exception) & ((1 << 16) - 1);
    return errorCode == ERROR_SHARING_VIOLATION || errorCode == ERROR_LOCK_VIOLATION;
}

internal static bool CanReadFile(string filePath)
{
    //Try-Catch so we dont crash the program and can check the exception
    try {
        //The "using" is important because FileStream implements IDisposable and
        //"using" will avoid a heap exhaustion situation when too many handles  
        //are left undisposed.
        using (FileStream fileStream = File.Open(filePath, FileMode.Open, FileAccess.ReadWrite, FileShare.None)) {
            if (fileStream != null) fileStream.Close();  //This line is me being overly cautious, fileStream will never be null unless an exception occurs... and I know the "using" does it but its helpful to be explicit - especially when we encounter errors - at least for me anyway!
        }
    }
    catch (IOException ex) {
        //THE FUNKY MAGIC - TO SEE IF THIS FILE REALLY IS LOCKED!!!
        if (IsFileLocked(ex)) {
            // do something, eg File.Copy or present the user with a MsgBox - I do not recommend Killing the process that is locking the file
            return false;
        }
    }
    finally
    { }
    return true;
}
}

For performance reasons I recommend you read the file content in the same operation. Here are some examples:

public static byte[] ReadFileBytes(string filePath)
{
    byte[] buffer = null;
    try
    {
        using (FileStream fileStream = File.Open(filePath, FileMode.Open, FileAccess.ReadWrite, FileShare.None))
        {
            int length = (int)fileStream.Length;  // get file length
            buffer = new byte[length];            // create buffer
            int count;                            // actual number of bytes read
            int sum = 0;                          // total number of bytes read

            // read until Read method returns 0 (end of the stream has been reached)
            while ((count = fileStream.Read(buffer, sum, length - sum)) > 0)
                sum += count;  // sum is a buffer offset for next reading

            fileStream.Close(); //This is not needed, just me being paranoid and explicitly releasing resources ASAP
        }
    }
    catch (IOException ex)
    {
        //THE FUNKY MAGIC - TO SEE IF THIS FILE REALLY IS LOCKED!!!
        if (IsFileLocked(ex))
        {
            // do something? 
        }
    }
    catch (Exception ex)
    {
    }
    finally
    {
    }
    return buffer;
}

public static string ReadFileTextWithEncoding(string filePath)
{
    string fileContents = string.Empty;
    byte[] buffer;
    try
    {
        using (FileStream fileStream = File.Open(filePath, FileMode.Open, FileAccess.ReadWrite, FileShare.None))
        {
            int length = (int)fileStream.Length;  // get file length
            buffer = new byte[length];            // create buffer
            int count;                            // actual number of bytes read
            int sum = 0;                          // total number of bytes read

            // read until Read method returns 0 (end of the stream has been reached)
            while ((count = fileStream.Read(buffer, sum, length - sum)) > 0)
            {
                sum += count;  // sum is a buffer offset for next reading
            }

            fileStream.Close(); //Again - this is not needed, just me being paranoid and explicitly releasing resources ASAP

            //Depending on the encoding you wish to use - I'll leave that up to you
            fileContents = System.Text.Encoding.Default.GetString(buffer);
        }
    }
    catch (IOException ex)
    {
        //THE FUNKY MAGIC - TO SEE IF THIS FILE REALLY IS LOCKED!!!
        if (IsFileLocked(ex))
        {
            // do something? 
        }
    }
    catch (Exception ex)
    {
    }
    finally
    { }     
    return fileContents;
}

public static string ReadFileTextNoEncoding(string filePath)
{
    string fileContents = string.Empty;
    byte[] buffer;
    try
    {
        using (FileStream fileStream = File.Open(filePath, FileMode.Open, FileAccess.ReadWrite, FileShare.None))
        {
            int length = (int)fileStream.Length;  // get file length
            buffer = new byte[length];            // create buffer
            int count;                            // actual number of bytes read
            int sum = 0;                          // total number of bytes read

            // read until Read method returns 0 (end of the stream has been reached)
            while ((count = fileStream.Read(buffer, sum, length - sum)) > 0) 
            {
                sum += count;  // sum is a buffer offset for next reading
            }

            fileStream.Close(); //Again - this is not needed, just me being paranoid and explicitly releasing resources ASAP

            char[] chars = new char[buffer.Length / sizeof(char) + 1];
            System.Buffer.BlockCopy(buffer, 0, chars, 0, buffer.Length);
            fileContents = new string(chars);
        }
    }
    catch (IOException ex)
    {
        //THE FUNKY MAGIC - TO SEE IF THIS FILE REALLY IS LOCKED!!!
        if (IsFileLocked(ex))
        {
            // do something? 
        }
    }
    catch (Exception ex)
    {
    }
    finally
    {
    }

    return fileContents;
}

Try it out yourself:

byte[] output1 = Helper.ReadFileBytes(@"c:\temp\test.txt");
string output2 = Helper.ReadFileTextWithEncoding(@"c:\temp\test.txt");
string output3 = Helper.ReadFileTextNoEncoding(@"c:\temp\test.txt");
  • 8
    I would upvote if there weren't so many "magic numbers" in there en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Magic_number_(programming) – Kris Mar 11 '13 at 21:27
  • 8
    @Kris meh cant you read bit shifts, lol – Jeremy Thompson Mar 15 '13 at 1:54
  • 2
    I was referring to the errorCode comparisons, not the bit shifts. though now you mention it... – Kris Mar 15 '13 at 9:35
  • 1
    Your Catch should be on IOException, instead of on general Exception and then a test on type. – Askolein Apr 22 '13 at 14:31
  • 3
    @JeremyThompson sadly you put the specific IOException after the general one. The general one will catch everything passing by and the specific IOException will always be lonely. Just swap the two. – Askolein Jun 18 '13 at 13:48

Perhaps you could use a FileSystemWatcher and watch for the Changed event.

I haven't used this myself, but it might be worth a shot. If the filesystemwatcher turns out to be a bit heavy for this case, I would go for the try/catch/sleep loop.

  • 1
    Using a FileSystemWatcher does not help, because the Created and Changed events raise at the beginning of a file creation/change. Even small files need more time to be written and closed by the operating system than the .NET application needs to run through the FileSystemEventHandler Callback. This is so sad, but there is no other option than to estimate the wait time before accessing the file or run into exception loops... – user219337 Jul 8 '11 at 12:29
  • FileSystemWatcher doesn't handle lots of changes at the same time very well though, so be careful with that. – Ben F Jun 20 '12 at 7:59
  • 1
    BTW, have you guys noticed while debugging and watching threads that MS calls their own FSW "FileSystemWather"? What's a wather anyway? – devlord Apr 22 '13 at 0:29
  • Precisely I got this problem because a windows service with FileSystemWatcher try to read the file before the process closed it. – freedeveloper Aug 8 at 15:09

the only way I know of is to use the Win32 exclusive lock API which isn't too speedy, but examples exist.

Most people, for a simple solution to this, simply to try/catch/sleep loops.

  • You can't use this API without first opening the file, at which point you no longer need to. – Harry Johnston Sep 7 '17 at 21:15
static bool FileInUse(string path)
    {
        try
        {
            using (FileStream fs = new FileStream(path, FileMode.OpenOrCreate))
            {
                fs.CanWrite
            }
            return false;
        }
        catch (IOException ex)
        {
            return true;
        }
    }

string filePath = "C:\\Documents And Settings\\yourfilename";
bool isFileInUse;

isFileInUse = FileInUse(filePath);

// Then you can do some checking
if (isFileInUse)
   Console.WriteLine("File is in use");
else
   Console.WriteLine("File is not in use");

Hope this helps!

  • 8
    The actual check you perform is fine; putting it inside a function is misleading. You do NOT want to use a function like this prior to opening a file. Inside the function, the file is opened, checked, and closed. Then the programmer ASSUMES the file is STILL ok to use and tries opening it for use. This is bad because it could be used and locked by another process that was queued up to open this file. Between the 1st time it was opened (for checking) and the 2nd time it was opened (for use), the OS could have descheduled your process and could be running another process. – Lakey Mar 25 '13 at 19:50

Just use the exception as intended. Accept that the file is in use and try again, repeatedly until your action is completed. This is also the most efficient because you do not waste any cycles checking the state before acting.

Use the function below, for example

TimeoutFileAction(() => { System.IO.File.etc...; return null; } );

Reusable method that times out after 2 seconds

private T TimeoutFileAction<T>(Func<T> func)
{
    var started = DateTime.UtcNow;
    while ((DateTime.UtcNow - started).TotalMilliseconds < 2000)
    {
        try
        {
            return func();                    
        }
        catch (System.IO.IOException exception)
        {
            //ignore, or log somewhere if you want to
        }
    }
    return default(T);
}

You can return a task which gives you a stream as soon as it becomes available. It's a simplified solution, but it is a good starting point. It's thread safe.

private async Task<Stream> GetStreamAsync()
{
    try
    {
        return new FileStream("sample.mp3", FileMode.Open, FileAccess.Write);
    }
    catch (IOException)
    {
        await Task.Delay(TimeSpan.FromSeconds(1));
        return await GetStreamAsync();
    }
}

You can use this stream as usual:

using (var stream = await FileStreamGetter.GetStreamAsync())
{
    Console.WriteLine(stream.Length);
}
  • 2
    How many seconds until a stack overflow from the recursion in GetStreamAsync()? – CAD bloke Jul 24 '17 at 11:14
  • @CADbloke, you have raised a very good point. Indeed my sample might have stack overflow exception, in case if a file is not available for a long time. Related to this answer stackoverflow.com/questions/4513438/…, it might raise the exception in 5 hours. – Ivan Branets Jul 26 '17 at 8:51
  • Related to your use cases it is preferable to throw I/O exception if let's say 10 attempts to read the file have been failed. The other strategy might be increasing waiting time for a second once 10 attempts have been failed. You can also use a mix of both. – Ivan Branets Jul 26 '17 at 8:59
  • I would (and do) simply alert the user the file is locked. They generally locked it themselves so they will probably do something about it. Or not. – CAD bloke Jul 26 '17 at 12:25
  • In some cases, you need to use retry policy since a file might not be ready yet. Imagine a desktop application to download images in some temporary folder. The application starts downloading and at the same time you open this folder in file explorer. Windows wants to create a thumbnail immediately and lock the file. At the same time, your app tries to replace the locked image to some other place. You will receive an exception if you don't use retry policy. – Ivan Branets Jul 31 '17 at 13:16

The accepted answers above suffer an issue where if file has been opened for writing with a FileShare.Read mode or if the file has a Read-Only attribute the code will not work. This modified solution works most reliably, with two things to keep in mind (as true for the accepted solution also):

  1. It will not work for files that has been opened with a write share mode
  2. This does not take into account threading issues so you will need to lock it down or handle threading issues separately.

Keeping the above in mind, this checks if the file is either locked for writing or locked to prevent reading:

public static bool FileLocked(string FileName)
{
    FileStream fs = null;

    try
    {
        // NOTE: This doesn't handle situations where file is opened for writing by another process but put into write shared mode, it will not throw an exception and won't show it as write locked
        fs = File.Open(FileName, FileMode.Open, FileAccess.ReadWrite, FileShare.None); // If we can't open file for reading and writing then it's locked by another process for writing
    }
    catch (UnauthorizedAccessException) // https://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/y973b725(v=vs.110).aspx
    {
        // This is because the file is Read-Only and we tried to open in ReadWrite mode, now try to open in Read only mode
        try
        {
            fs = File.Open(FileName, FileMode.Open, FileAccess.Read, FileShare.None);
        }
        catch (Exception)
        {
            return true; // This file has been locked, we can't even open it to read
        }
    }
    catch (Exception)
    {
        return true; // This file has been locked
    }
    finally
    {
        if (fs != null)
            fs.Close();
    }
    return false;
}
  • Still has the same problem as the accepted answer - it only tells you whether the file was locked by another process at one particular moment in time, which is not useful information. By the time the function has returned the result may already be out of date! – Harry Johnston Oct 16 '15 at 19:57
  • 1
    that's true, one can only check at any given moment of time (or subscribe to events), the advantage of this approach over the accepted solution is that it can check for a read only attribute and a write lock and not return a false positive. – rboy Oct 17 '15 at 3:03

Here is some code that as far as I can best tell does the same thing as the accepted answer but with less code:

    public static bool IsFileLocked(string file)
    {
        try
        {
            using (var stream = File.OpenRead(file))
                return false;
        }
        catch (IOException)
        {
            return true;
        }        
    }

However I think it is more robust to do it in the following manner:

    public static void TryToDoWithFileStream(string file, Action<FileStream> action, 
        int count, int msecTimeOut)
    {
        FileStream stream = null;
        for (var i = 0; i < count; ++i)
        {
            try
            {
                stream = File.OpenRead(file);
                break;
            }
            catch (IOException)
            {
                Thread.Sleep(msecTimeOut);
            }
        }
        action(stream);
    }

You can use my library for accessing files from multiple apps.

You can install it from nuget: Install-Package Xabe.FileLock

If you want more information about it check https://github.com/tomaszzmuda/Xabe.FileLock

ILock fileLock = new FileLock(file);
if(fileLock.Acquire(TimeSpan.FromSeconds(15), true))
{
    using(fileLock)
    {
        // file operations here
    }
}

fileLock.Acquire method will return true only if can lock file exclusive for this object. But app which uploading file must do it in file lock too. If object is inaccessible metod returns false.

  • Please don't just post some tool or library as an answer. At least demonstrate how it solves the problem in the answer itself. – paper1111 Sep 7 '17 at 10:45
  • Added demo :) Sorry @paper1111 – Tomasz Żmuda Sep 7 '17 at 10:50
  • 1
    Requires all the processes that are using the file to cooperate. Unlikely to be applicable to the OPs original problem. – Harry Johnston Sep 7 '17 at 21:17

In my experience, you usually want to do this, then 'protect' your files to do something fancy and then use the 'protected' files. If you have just one file you want to use like this, you can use the trick that's explained in the answer by Jeremy Thompson. However, if you attempt to do this on lots of files (say, for example when you're writing an installer), you're in for quite a bit of hurt.

A very elegant way this can be solved is by using the fact that your file system will not allow you to change a folder name if one of the files there it's being used. Keep the folder in the same file system and it'll work like a charm.

Do note that you should be aware of the obvious ways this can be exploited. After all, the files won't be locked. Also, be aware that there are other reasons that can result in your Move operation to fail. Obviously proper error handling (MSDN) can help out here.

var originalFolder = @"c:\myHugeCollectionOfFiles"; // your folder name here
var someFolder = Path.Combine(originalFolder, "..", Guid.NewGuid().ToString("N"));

try
{
    Directory.Move(originalFolder, someFolder);

    // Use files
}
catch // TODO: proper exception handling
{
    // Inform user, take action
}
finally
{
    Directory.Move(someFolder, originalFolder);
}

For individual files I'd stick with the locking suggestion posted by Jeremy Thompson.

  • Hi, Since the order of answers changes can you clarify which post above you mean for readers of this popular QA. Thanks. – Jeremy Thompson Nov 21 '14 at 11:02
  • 1
    @JeremyThompson You're right, thanks, I'll edit the post. I'd use the solution from you, mainly because of your correct use of FileShare and checking for a lock. – atlaste Nov 21 '14 at 11:09

Aside from working 3-liners and just for reference: If you want the full blown information - there is a little project on Microsoft Dev Center:

https://code.msdn.microsoft.com/windowsapps/How-to-know-the-process-704839f4

From the Introduction:

The C# sample code developed in .NET Framework 4.0 would help in finding out which is the process that is having a lock on a file. RmStartSession function which is included in rstrtmgr.dll has been used to create a restart manager session and according to the return result a new instance of Win32Exception object is created. After registering the resources to a Restart Manager session via RmRegisterRescources function, RmGetList function is invoked to check what are the applications are using a particular file by enumerating the RM_PROCESS_INFO array.

It works by connecting to the "Restart Manager Session".

The Restart Manager uses the list of resources registered with the session to determine which applications and services must be shut down and restarted. Resources can be identified by filenames, service short names, or RM_UNIQUE_PROCESS structures that describe running applications.

It might be a little overengineered for your particular needs... But if that is what you want, go ahead and grab the vs-project.

I'm interested to see if this triggers any WTF reflexes. I have a process which creates and subsequently launches a PDF document from a console app. However, I was dealing with a frailty where if the user were to run the process multiple times, generating the same file without first closing the previously generated file, the app would throw an exception and die. This was a rather frequent occurrence because file names are based on sales quote numbers.

Rather than failing in such an ungraceful manner, I decided to rely on auto-incremented file versioning:

private static string WriteFileToDisk(byte[] data, string fileName, int version = 0)
{
    try
    {
        var versionExtension = version > 0 ? $"_{version:000}" : string.Empty;
        var filePath = Path.Combine(AppDomain.CurrentDomain.BaseDirectory, $"{fileName}{versionExtension}.pdf");
        using (var writer = new FileStream(filePath, FileMode.Create))
        {
            writer.Write(data, 0, data.Length);
        }
        return filePath;
    }
    catch (IOException)
    {
        return WriteFileToDisk(data, fileName, ++version);
    }
}

Probably some more care can be given to the catch block to ensure I'm catching the correct IOException(s). I'll probably also clear out the app storage on startup since these files are intended to be temporary anyways.

I realize this goes beyond the scope of the OP's question of simply checking if the file is in use but this was indeed the problem I was looking to solve when I arrived here so perhaps it will be useful to someone else.

Try and move/copy the file to a temp dir. If you can, it has no lock and you can safely work in the temp dir without getting locks. Else just try to move it again in x seconds.

  • What if something locks it right after you move the file? – jcolebrand Mar 11 '13 at 14:27
  • @jcolebrand locks what? the one you copied? Or the one you put in the temp dir? – Cullub Aug 7 '14 at 17:23
  • 4
    if you copy the file, expecting nobody else to be working on it, and you're going to use the temp file, and then someone locks it right after you copy it, then you've potentially lost data. – jcolebrand Aug 7 '14 at 21:07

I use this workaround, but i have a timespan between when i check the file locking with IsFileLocked function and when i open the file. In this timespan some other thread can open the file, so i will get IOException.

So, i added extra code for this. In my case i want load XDocument:

        XDocument xDoc = null;

        while (xDoc == null)
        {
            while (IsFileBeingUsed(_interactionXMLPath))
            {
                Logger.WriteMessage(Logger.LogPrioritet.Warning, "Deserialize can not open XML file. is being used by another process. wait...");
                Thread.Sleep(100);
            }
            try
            {
                xDoc = XDocument.Load(_interactionXMLPath);
            }
            catch
            {
                Logger.WriteMessage(Logger.LogPrioritet.Error, "Load working!!!!!");
            }
        }

What do you think? Can i change some thing? Maybe i did not have to use IsFileBeingUsed function at all?

Thanks

  • 3
    what is IsFileBeingUsed ? source code about IsFileBeingUsed ? – Kiquenet Jul 30 '13 at 6:01

protected by NotMe Mar 11 '13 at 19:01

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