294

Can anyone suggest to me how I can pass a parameter to a thread?

Also, how does it work for anonymous classes?

  • 5
    Would you mind to add some extra explanation of that exactly you trying to do? There are a lot of several techniques to it, but all of them depend on the final goal. – Artem Barger May 18 '09 at 10:40
  • 4
    Do you mean passing a parameter to an already running thread ? Because all the current answers are about passing parameters to new threads... – Valentin Rocher May 18 '09 at 10:43
  • Now you can use Consumer<T>. – Alex78191 Feb 25 '19 at 18:49

18 Answers 18

372

You need to pass the parameter in the constructor to the Runnable object:

public class MyRunnable implements Runnable {

   public MyRunnable(Object parameter) {
       // store parameter for later user
   }

   public void run() {
   }
}

and invoke it thus:

Runnable r = new MyRunnable(param_value);
new Thread(r).start();
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  • 7
    @jasonm no, it's a constructor - constructors don't have a return type. – Alnitak Nov 22 '12 at 16:30
  • This means that each Thread constructed using r will have the same argument, so if we want to pass different arguments to multiple Threads running MyThread we'd need to create a new MyThread instance using the desired argument for each Thread. In other words, to get a thread up and running we need to create two objects: Thread and MyThread. Is this considered bad, performance-wise? – Isaac Kleinman Oct 15 '13 at 21:19
  • 2
    @IsaacKleinman well, you have to do that anyway, unless you extend Thread. And this solution still works in that case - just change "implements Runnable" to "extends Thread", "Runnable" to "Thread", and "new Thread(r)" to "r". – user253751 May 9 '15 at 2:29
113

For Anonymous classes:

In response to question edits here is how it works for Anonymous classes

   final X parameter = ...; // the final is important
   Thread t = new Thread(new Runnable() {
       p = parameter;
       public void run() { 
         ...
       };
   t.start();

Named classes:

You have a class that extends Thread (or implements Runnable) and a constructor with the parameters you'd like to pass. Then, when you create the new thread, you have to pass in the arguments, and then start the thread, something like this:

Thread t = new MyThread(args...);
t.start();

Runnable is a much better solution than Thread BTW. So I'd prefer:

   public class MyRunnable implements Runnable {
      private X parameter;
      public MyRunnable(X parameter) {
         this.parameter = parameter;
      }

      public void run() {
      }
   }
   Thread t = new Thread(new MyRunnable(parameter));
   t.start();

This answer is basically the same as this similar question: How to pass parameters to a Thread object

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  • 2
    I have code similar to your anonymous class example, except I access parameter directly from the run() method without using a field like p at all. It seems to work. Is there some subtle multithreading thing I am missing by not copying parameter to p beforehand? – Randall Cook Jun 6 '14 at 22:34
  • I think you're missing a ) in the first example – Hack-R Sep 6 '16 at 14:50
  • I had the same experience as @RandallCook for Anonymous class. As long as I had the final X parameter before the new Runnable() line, then I could access parameter inside run(). I didn't need to need to do the extra p = parameter. – wisbucky May 18 '18 at 2:00
  • final is not that important any more; it's enough if the variable is effectively final (despite it does no harm having it) – user85421 Jun 10 '19 at 19:50
43

via constructor of a Runnable or Thread class

class MyThread extends Thread {

    private String to;

    public MyThread(String to) {
        this.to = to;
    }

    @Override
    public void run() {
        System.out.println("hello " + to);
    }
}

public static void main(String[] args) {
    new MyThread("world!").start();
}
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  • 5
    +1 for showing how to do it extending Thread instead of implementing Runnable. – Caelum Nov 6 '14 at 18:11
  • 1
    why do we need the @Override for? – Snow May 3 '18 at 21:21
  • @Snow the @Override explicitly states that it is overriding the abstract method in the Thread class. – wyskoj Mar 15 '19 at 0:37
22

This answer comes very late, but maybe someone will find it useful. It is about how to pass a parameter(s) to a Runnable without even declaring named class (handy for inliners):

String someValue = "Just a demo, really...";
new Thread(new Runnable() {
    private String myParam;
    public Runnable init(String myParam) {
        this.myParam = myParam;
        return this;
    }
    @Override
    public void run() {
        System.out.println("This is called from another thread.");
        System.out.println(this.myParam);
    }
}.init(someValue)).start();

Of course you can postpone execution of start to some more convenient or appropriate moment. And it is up to you what will be the signature of init method (so it may take more and/or different arguments) and of course even its name, but basically you get an idea.

In fact there is also another way of passing a parameter to an anonymous class, with the use of the initializer blocks. Consider this:

String someValue = "Another demo, no serious thing...";
int anotherValue = 42;

new Thread(new Runnable() {
    private String myParam;
    private int myOtherParam;
    {
        this.myParam = someValue;
        this.myOtherParam = anotherValue;
    }
    @Override
    public void run() {
        System.out.println("This comes from another thread.");
        System.out.println(this.myParam + ", " + this.myOtherParam);
    }
}).start();

So all happens inside of the initializer block.

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  • I actually liked this last example quite well. Reminds me of using a closure in JS to reference variables in the outer scope. But is the this.myParam then really necessary? Couldn't you just drop the private variables and refer to the variable from the outer scope? I understand (of course) that this has some implications, such as the variable being open to change after starting the thread. – oligofren Feb 15 '18 at 16:10
  • @JeffG actually answered this in the answer below! – oligofren Feb 15 '18 at 16:11
17

When you create a thread, you need an instance of Runnable. The easiest way to pass in a parameter would be to pass it in as an argument to the constructor:

public class MyRunnable implements Runnable {

    private volatile String myParam;

    public MyRunnable(String myParam){
        this.myParam = myParam;
        ...
    }

    public void run(){
        // do something with myParam here
        ...
    }

}

MyRunnable myRunnable = new myRunnable("Hello World");
new Thread(myRunnable).start();

If you then want to change the parameter while the thread is running, you can simply add a setter method to your runnable class:

public void setMyParam(String value){
    this.myParam = value;
}

Once you have this, you can change the value of the parameter by calling like this:

myRunnable.setMyParam("Goodbye World");

Of course, if you want to trigger an action when the parameter is changed, you will have to use locks, which makes things considerably more complex.

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  • 1
    Doesn't adding a setter create potential race conditions? If the thread starts with the variable as one value but the setter changes it mid-execution wouldn't that be problematic? – anon58192932 Oct 12 '17 at 22:47
  • True, the setter and all access to the parameter should be synchronised. – jwoolard Dec 19 '17 at 17:41
9

You can either extend the Thread class or the Runnable class and provide parameters as you want. There are simple examples in the docs. I'll port them here:

 class PrimeThread extends Thread {
     long minPrime;
     PrimeThread(long minPrime) {
         this.minPrime = minPrime;
     }

     public void run() {
         // compute primes larger than minPrime
          . . .
     }
 }

 PrimeThread p = new PrimeThread(143);
 p.start();

 class PrimeRun implements Runnable {
     long minPrime;
     PrimeRun(long minPrime) {
         this.minPrime = minPrime;
     }

     public void run() {
         // compute primes larger than minPrime
          . . .
     }
 }


 PrimeRun p = new PrimeRun(143);
 new Thread(p).start();
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9

To create a thread you normally create your own implementation of Runnable. Pass the parameters to the thread in the constructor of this class.

class MyThread implements Runnable{
   private int a;
   private String b;
   private double c;

   public MyThread(int a, String b, double c){
      this.a = a;
      this.b = b;
      this.c = c;
   }

   public void run(){
      doSomething(a, b, c);
   }
}
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7

Either write a class that implements Runnable, and pass whatever you need in a suitably defined constructor, or write a class that extends Thread with a suitably defined constructor that calls super() with appropriate parameters.

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6

As of Java 8, you can use a lambda to capture parameters that are effectively final. For example:

final String param1 = "First param";
final int param2 = 2;
new Thread(() -> {
    // Do whatever you want here: param1 and param2 are in-scope!
    System.out.println(param1);
    System.out.println(param2);
}).start();
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5

In Java 8 you can use lambda expressions with the Concurrency API & the ExecutorService as a higher level replacement for working with threads directly:

newCachedThreadPool() Creates a thread pool that creates new threads as needed, but will reuse previously constructed threads when they are available. These pools will typically improve the performance of programs that execute many short-lived asynchronous tasks.

    private static final ExecutorService executor = Executors.newCachedThreadPool();

    executor.submit(() -> {
        myFunction(myParam1, myParam2);
    });

See also executors javadocs.

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  • Finally a way to do it without those annoying fields. Now I just need to wait for my product to upgrade to Java 8. – Sridhar Sarnobat Sep 13 '19 at 20:05
5

I know that I'm a few years late, but I came across this issue and took an unorthodox approach. I wanted to do it without making a new class, so this is what I came up with:

int x = 0;
new Thread((new Runnable() {
     int x;
     public void run() {
        // stuff with x and whatever else you want
     }
     public Runnable pass(int x) {
           this.x = x;
           return this;
     }
}).pass(x)).start();
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4

Parameter passing via the start() and run() methods:

// Tester
public static void main(String... args) throws Exception {
    ThreadType2 t = new ThreadType2(new RunnableType2(){
        public void run(Object object) {
            System.out.println("Parameter="+object);
        }});
    t.start("the parameter");
}

// New class 1 of 2
public class ThreadType2 {
    final private Thread thread;
    private Object objectIn = null;
    ThreadType2(final RunnableType2 runnableType2) {
        thread = new Thread(new Runnable() {
            public void run() {
                runnableType2.run(objectIn);
            }});
    }
    public void start(final Object object) {
        this.objectIn = object;
        thread.start();
    }
    // If you want to do things like setDaemon(true); 
    public Thread getThread() {
        return thread;
    }
}

// New class 2 of 2
public interface RunnableType2 {
    public void run(Object object);
}
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3

You can derive a class from Runnable, and during the construction (say) pass the parameter in.

Then launch it using Thread.start(Runnable r);

If you mean whilst the thread is running, then simply hold a reference to your derived object in the calling thread, and call the appropriate setter methods (synchronising where appropriate)

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2

There is a simple way of passing parameters into runnables. Code:

public void Function(final type variable) {
    Runnable runnable = new Runnable() {
        public void run() {
            //Code adding here...
        }
    };
    new Thread(runnable).start();
}
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2

No you can't pass parameters to the run() method. The signature tells you that (it has no parameters). Probably the easiest way to do this would be to use a purpose-built object that takes a parameter in the constructor and stores it in a final variable:

public class WorkingTask implements Runnable
{
    private final Object toWorkWith;

    public WorkingTask(Object workOnMe)
    {
        toWorkWith = workOnMe;
    }

    public void run()
    {
        //do work
    }
}

//...
Thread t = new Thread(new WorkingTask(theData));
t.start();

Once you do that - you have to be careful of the data integrity of the object you pass into the 'WorkingTask'. The data will now exist in two different threads so you have to make sure it is Thread Safe.

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1

One further option; this approach lets you use the Runnable item like an asynchronous function call. If your task does not need to return a result, e.g. it just performs some action you don't need to worry about how you pass back an "outcome".

This pattern lets you reuse an item, where you need some kind of internal state. When not passing parameter(s) in the constructor care is needed to mediate the programs access to parameters. You may need more checks if your use-case involves different callers, etc.

public class MyRunnable implements Runnable 
{
  private final Boolean PARAMETER_LOCK  = false;
  private X parameter;

  public MyRunnable(X parameter) {
     this.parameter = parameter;
  }

  public void setParameter( final X newParameter ){

      boolean done = false;
      synchronize( PARAMETER_LOCK )
      {
          if( null == parameter )
          {
              parameter = newParameter;
              done = true;
          }
      }
      if( ! done )
      {
          throw new RuntimeException("MyRunnable - Parameter not cleared." );
      }
  }


  public void clearParameter(){

      synchronize( PARAMETER_LOCK )
      {
          parameter = null;
      }
  }


  public void run() {

      X localParameter;

      synchronize( PARAMETER_LOCK )
      {
          localParameter = parameter;
      }

      if( null != localParameter )
      {
         clearParameter();   //-- could clear now, or later, or not at all ...
         doSomeStuff( localParameter );
      }

  }

}

Thread t = new Thread(new MyRunnable(parameter)); t.start();

If you need a result of processing, you will also need to coordinate completion of MyRunnable when the sub-task finishes. You could pass a call back or just wait on the Thread 't', etc.

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1

Specially for Android

For callback purposes I usually implement my own generic Runnable with input parameter(s):

public interface Runnable<TResult> {
    void run(TResult result);
}

Usage is simple:

myManager.doCallbackOperation(new Runnable<MyResult>() {
    @Override
    public void run(MyResult result) {
        // do something with the result
    }
});

In manager:

public void doCallbackOperation(Runnable<MyResult> runnable) {
    new AsyncTask<Void, Void, MyResult>() {
        @Override
        protected MyResult doInBackground(Void... params) {
            // do background operation
            return new MyResult(); // return resulting object
        }

        @Override
        protected void onPostExecute(MyResult result) {
            // execute runnable passing the result when operation has finished
            runnable.run(result);
        }
    }.execute();
}
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1

Create a local variable in your class that extends Thread or implements Runnable.

public class Extractor extends Thread {
    public String webpage = "";
    public Extractor(String w){
        webpage = w;
    }
    public void setWebpage(String l){
        webpage = l;
    }

    @Override
    public void run() {// l is link
        System.out.println(webpage);
    }
    public String toString(){
        return "Page: "+webpage;
    }}

This way, you can pass a variable when you run it.

Extractor e = new Extractor("www.google.com");
e.start();

The output:

"www.google.com"
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