10

This question already has an answer here:

While profiling my Python's application, I've discovered that len() seems to be a very expensive one when using sets. See the below code:

import cProfile

def lenA(s):
    for i in range(1000000):
        len(s);

def lenB(s):
    for i in range(1000000):
        s.__len__();

def main():
    s = set();
    lenA(s);
    lenB(s);

if __name__ == "__main__":
    cProfile.run("main()","stats");

According to profiler's stats below, lenA() seems to be 14 times slower than lenB():

 ncalls  tottime  percall  cumtime  percall  filename:lineno(function)
      1    1.986    1.986    3.830    3.830  .../lentest.py:5(lenA)
1000000    1.845    0.000    1.845    0.000  {built-in method len}
      1    0.273    0.273    0.273    0.273  .../lentest.py:9(lenB)

Am I missing something? Currently I use __len__() instead of len(), but the code looks dirty :(

marked as duplicate by Martijn Pieters python Sep 23 '17 at 8:49

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

  • 7
    Why are you using cProfile instead of timeit? The former is for finding bottlenecks in large programs, and sacrifices some accuracy on the small scale for it. The latter is for measuring the overall performance of tiny snippets relatively precisely. timeit should be the first choice for microbenchmarks like this. And for me, it indicates a less extreme difference (0.0879 µs per len call, 0.158 µs per .__len__ call => len being 70% slower). – user395760 Jan 8 '12 at 15:33
  • Thanks @delnan, I'm quite new in Python. Using timeit I also get similar ratio. Indeed, my program is much larger than the above code, but it surprised me that len() function appeared as one of major bottlenecks. OK, so I will just ignore len() and focus on my own functions, right? – Tregoreg Jan 8 '12 at 15:56
17

Obviously, len has some overhead, since it does a function call and translates AttributeError to TypeError. Also, set.__len__ is such a simple operation that it's bound to be very fast in comparison to just about anything, but I still don't find anything like the 14x difference when using timeit:

In [1]: s = set()

In [2]: %timeit s.__len__()
1000000 loops, best of 3: 197 ns per loop

In [3]: %timeit len(s)
10000000 loops, best of 3: 130 ns per loop

You should always just call len, not __len__. If the call to len is the bottleneck in your program, you should rethink its design, e.g. cache sizes somewhere or calculate them without calling len.

  • +1: In particular, don't prematurely optimize. Benchmarks can be flawed, and as you might have seen now, three benchmarks will likely return three different results; and you might end up benchmarking something completely different than you expected with such a micro-benchmark. Obivously, len can not be faster, as it calls __len__. But that is about all that is certain. – Anony-Mousse Jan 8 '12 at 16:21
  • 2
    @Anony-Mousse: actually, I just looked at my own results again and I only now see that len is faster than __len__. Not sure how that came about. – Fred Foo Jan 8 '12 at 16:51
  • 3
    s.__len__ does a function call also, and has to look up an attribute. That outweighs the global lookup of len. – WolframH Feb 11 '12 at 13:30
  • 1
    @FredFoo: len() doesn't have to look up __len__ for built-in types. In fact, it never looks up __len__ directly. It looks up the tp_as_sequence pointer, traversing to the sq_length attribute of that struct. Custom Python classes fill that slot with a lookup of the __len__ attribute. For set and list and such, there is no need for that last step. – Martijn Pieters Sep 23 '17 at 8:51
5

This is an interesting observation about the profiler, which has nothing to do with the actual performance of the len function. You see, in the profiler stats, there are two lines concerning lenA:

 ncalls  tottime  percall  cumtime  percall  filename:lineno(function)
      1    1.986    1.986    3.830    3.830  .../lentest.py:5(lenA)
1000000    1.845    0.000    1.845    0.000  {built-in method len}

...while there is only one line concerning lenB:

      1    0.273    0.273    0.273    0.273  .../lentest.py:9(lenB)

The profiler has timed each single call from lenA to len, but timed lenB as a whole. Timing a call always adds some overhead; in the case of lenA you see this overhead multiplied a million times.

  • 1
    I think that your point is absolutely precise. It's all about cProfile's overhead, not about performance of len function. – Tregoreg Jan 20 '12 at 0:57
1

This was going to be a comment but after larsman's comment on his controversial results and the result I got, I think it is interesting to add my data to the thread.

Trying more or less the same setup I got the contrary the OP got, and in the same direction commented by larsman:

12.1964105975   <- __len__
6.22144670823   <- len()

C:\Python26\programas>

The test:

def lenA(s):
    for i in range(100):
        len(s);

def lenB(s):
    for i in range(100):
        s.__len__();

s = set()

if __name__ == "__main__":

    from timeit import timeit
    print timeit("lenB(s)", setup="from __main__ import lenB, s")
    print timeit("lenA(s)", setup="from __main__ import lenA, s")

This is activepython 2.6.7 64bit in win7

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.