31

json2.js seems to ignore members of the parent object when using JSON.stringify(). Example:

require('./json2.js');

function WorldObject(type) {    
    this.position = 4;
}

function Actor(val) {
    this.someVal = 50;
}

Actor.prototype = new WorldObject();

var a = new Actor(2);

console.log(a.position);
console.log(JSON.stringify(a));

The output is:

4
{"someVal":50}

I would expect this output:

4
{"position":0, "someVal":50}
34

Well that's just the way it is, JSON.stringify does not preserve any of the not-owned properties of the object. You can have a look at an interesting discussion about other drawbacks and possible workarounds here.

Also note that the author has not only documented the problems, but also written a library called HydrateJS that might help you.

The problem is a little bit deeper than it seems at the first sight. Even if a would really stringify to {"position":0, "someVal":50}, then parsing it later would create an object that has the desired properties, but is neither an instance of Actor, nor has it a prototype link to the WorldObject (after all, the parse method doesn't have this info, so it can't possibly restore it that way).

To preserve the prototype chain, clever tricks are necessary (like those used in HydrateJS). If this is not what you are aiming for, maybe you just need to "flatten" the object before stringifying it. To do that, you could e.g. iterate all the properties of the object, regardless of whether they are own or not and re-assign them (this will ensure they get defined on the object itself instead of just inherited from the prototype).

function flatten(obj) {
    var result = Object.create(obj);
    for(var key in result) {
        result[key] = result[key];
    }
    return result;
}

The way the function is written it doesn't mutate the original object. So using

console.log(JSON.stringify(flatten(a)));

you'll get the output you want and a will stay the same.

  • I think this code is basically what I need. I should be able to save out this serialized version and write a simple loader. Nice work! – wtjones Jan 8 '12 at 20:14
  • Using this code gives me an error message because one of the properties is read only. – Simon Christiansen May 5 '18 at 9:14
  • I successfully replaced it with function flattenObject(obj) { var result = {}; for(var key in obj) { result[key] = obj[key]; } return result; } – Simon Christiansen May 5 '18 at 9:21
21

Another option would be to define a toJSON method in the object prototype you want to serialize:

function Test(){}

Test.prototype = {

    someProperty: "some value", 

    toJSON: function() {
        var tmp = {};

        for(var key in this) {
            if(typeof this[key] !== 'function')
                tmp[key] = this[key];
        }

        return tmp;
    }
};

var t = new Test;

JSON.stringify(t); // returns "{"someProperty" : "some value"}"

This works since JSON.stringify searches for a toJSON method in the object it receives, before trying the native serialization.

9

Check this fiddle: http://jsfiddle.net/AEGYG/

You can flat-stringify the object using this function:

function flatStringify(x) {
    for(var i in x) {
        if(!x.hasOwnProperty(i)) {
            // weird as it might seem, this actually does the trick! - adds parent property to self
            x[i] = x[i];
        }
    }
    return JSON.stringify(x);
}
  • I wish I could mark both as answers because this also works just as well as Tomas's snippet, thanks! – wtjones Jan 8 '12 at 20:12
  • 1
    This mutates the original object, which is really bad for a generic answer. – Mörre Jan 30 at 13:29
  • @Mörre - True that. This was quite a while ago, didn't really think of that when writing this answer. :) – techfoobar Jan 30 at 14:21
3

Here is a recursive version of the snippet @TomasVana included in his answer, in case there is inheritance in multiple levels of your object tree:

var flatten = function(obj) {
    if (obj === null) {
        return null;
    }

    if (Array.isArray(obj)) {
        var newObj = [];
        for (var i = 0; i < obj.length; i++) {
            if (typeof obj[i] === 'object') {
                newObj.push(flatten(obj[i]));
            }
            else {
                newObj.push(obj[i]);
            }
        }
        return newObj;
    }

    var result = Object.create(obj);
    for(var key in result) {
        if (typeof result[key] === 'object') {
            result[key] = flatten(result[key]);
        }
        else {
            result[key] = result[key];
        }
    }
    return result;
}

And it keeps arrays as arrays. Call it the same way:

console.log(JSON.stringify(flatten(visualDataViews)));
1

While the flatten approach in general works, the snippets in other answers posted so far don't work for properties that are not modifiable, for example if the prototype has been frozen. To handle this case, you would need to create a new object and assign the properties to this new object. Since you're just stringifying the resulting object, object identity and other JavaScript internals probably don't matter, so it's perfectly fine to return a new object. This approach is also arguably more readable than reassigning an object's properties to itself, since it doesn't look like a no-op:

function flatten(obj) {
    var ret = {};
    for (var i in obj) {
        ret[i] = obj[i];
    }
    return ret;
}

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