24

I'm wondering if this is completely thread-safe and whether or not the volatile keyword should be in place.

using System.Threading;

class Program
{
    private static volatile bool _restart = true;

    private static void Main()
    {
        while (_restart)
        {
            // Do stuff here every time for as long as _restart is true
            Thread.Sleep(1);
        }
    }

    private static void SomeOtherThread()
    {
        Thread.Sleep(1000);
        _restart = false;
    }
}

I think it is, but I want to double check, since I'm not 100% certain I just want to be sure.

I think the volatile keyword is required because then it would never be possible to have the value cached in registers or alike optimizations.

5
  • That's not really what thread-safe means. Thread-safe (typically) means that multiple calls to the same class/library won't blow away static data stored by the library. Commented Jan 8, 2012 at 17:03
  • In your example though, if all you want to do is flag another thread, I don't see what that won't work. Commented Jan 8, 2012 at 17:03
  • @JonathonReinhart Yes, I'm only having it as a flag. If this isn't thread-safety is it concurrency?
    – Aidiakapi
    Commented Jan 8, 2012 at 17:07
  • 1
    The problem with this code is there is a race condition on setting and checking _restart. What happens if _restart gets set just after you have checked it with while and entered the loop? You had better make sure that all the code implied by the comment and Thread.Sleep in the loop is safe to run when _restart is true! This is a potentially very dangerous way to synchronise threads because you start to believe that once in the loop _restart must stay false until you check it again.
    – Felix
    Commented Jul 30, 2020 at 22:12
  • 1
    @Felix That's a very weird assumption to make. When using CancellationTokens, you also periodically check if it's cancelled, should that also be considered "dangerous", because you might still be doing work between two points where you check for cancellation?
    – Aidiakapi
    Commented Jul 31, 2020 at 9:15

2 Answers 2

17

What SLaks answered is correct, of course, but to answer your question: yes on both counts: it is safe, it should be declared volatile.

1
  • on the web page of volatile : On a multiprocessor system, a volatile read operation does not guarantee to obtain the latest value written to that memory location by any processor. Similarly, a volatile write operation does not guarantee that the value written would be immediately visible to other processors.
    – xiaohei
    Commented Jun 29, 2023 at 8:13
14

You should replace that entire construct with a ManualResetEvent, which is both thread-safe and faster.

private static readonly ManualResetEvent ev = new ManualResetEvent();

private static void Main()
{
    ev.WaitOne()
}

private static void SomeOtherThread()
{
    Thread.Sleep(1000);
    ev.Set();
}
2
  • 4
    This is not what I want, I don't want the Main thread (in this case) to sleep. I just want it to keep on iterating. Otherwise I'd use a different construct as well. Sorry that I wasn't clear on this, please see the update.
    – Aidiakapi
    Commented Jan 8, 2012 at 17:09
  • +1 that is better.., however @Aidiakapi note that your solution will work correctly; the volatile keyword will flushes the _restart = false new value to the main memory and so it the updated value will been seen at your Main method..
    – Jalal Said
    Commented Jan 8, 2012 at 17:09

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