2
public class Foo
{
    public void Draw() // Called 60 times per second
    {
        spriteBatch.Draw(new Vector2(x, y), null, Color.White);
    }

    private float x, y;
}

In particular, I am wondering if the new Vector2(x, y) call is generating garbage or not.

My understanding is that since Vector2 is a value type, and is not being stored as a member of a reference type, it will be created on the stack. Therefore its memory should be automatically reclaimed as soon as the Drawmethod returns, generating no garbage.

Is that correct?


EDIT

If I may request further clarification on Eric Lippert's initial post.

Question 1)

It depends on whether the first formal parameter of the invoked function takes a reference type or the value type. If it takes the value type then no, there is no garbage generated here. If it takes a reference type then the value will be boxed.

Then if the signature happened to be like this:

public void Draw()
{
    Vector2 vector = new Vector2(x, y);
    spriteBatch.Draw(ref vector, null, Color.White);
}

It would generate garbage from vector being boxed?

Question 2)

Just because it is not on the heap does not logically entail that it is generated on the stack. It could be in a register.

But I assume being stored in a register would behave like being stored in the stack from the garbage collector point of view. Is that correct?

migrated from gamedev.stackexchange.com Jan 9 '12 at 18:48

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5

I am wondering if the new Vector2(x, y) call is generating garbage or not.

It depends on whether the first formal parameter of the invoked function takes a reference type or the value type. If it takes the value type then no, there is no garbage generated here. If it takes a reference type then the value will be boxed.

My understanding is that since Vector2 is a value type, and is not being stored as a member of a reference type, it will be created on the stack

Just because it is not on the heap does not logically entail that it is generated on the stack. It could be in a register.

if the signature required passing the struct "by ref" (using "ref" or "out" modifiers) would there be any boxing?

No. You are mixing up two kinds of reference. A "reference" which is an alias to a variable is not an object:

void D(int q) {}
void D(ref int q) {}
void D(object q) {}

The first method D takes a copy of an integer. The second D makes an alias to a variable containing an unboxed integer. The third D takes a boxed integer.

I assume being stored in a register would behave like being stored in the stack from the garbage collector point of view.

That is not a valid assumption. Suppose the value that is either enregistered or placed on the stack contains a reference to a garbage collected object. The jitter is within its rights to treat enregistered references differently from stack references. Suppose for example that the jitter's register allocation algorithm decides to re-use that register for something else after the jitter knows that the reference will no longer be dereferenced. The jitter is perfectly free to then tell the garbage collector that the reference is gone. By doing so, it is possible that 'this' is freed by the GC thread even while a method of the object is executing.

The jitter is of course free to do so with the stack as well, but that would be a much more aggressive optimization.

  • It's XNA - the method signature accepts a Vector2 by value. Still +1 for mentioning boxing. – Jonathan Dickinson Jan 9 '12 at 19:25
  • Thank you for the great input, but that does raise a new series of concerns. Could you perhaps take a look at my edit? – David Gouveia Jan 9 '12 at 19:55
  • Just stumbled on the documentation that: There is no boxing of a value type when it is passed by reference. It seems that I misunderstood "taking a value type by reference" as being the same as "taking a reference type". – David Gouveia Jan 9 '12 at 20:05
  • Got it. Thank you for the enlightenment, once again. – David Gouveia Jan 10 '12 at 1:09
3

Correct, the Vector2 will live on the relevant stack frames (as will the Color) - note though: because it's not being passed by ref the value will be copied into the Draw stack frame. Vector2 is really small (64 bits/8 bytes) and this is most-likely a non-issue - but as soon as each stack frame is done with the Vector2 the memory will be reclaimed.

  • Thanks, that clarified everything, including the fact that the vector is being copied too. I've used all my votes for the day, but will upvote tomorrow. – David Gouveia Jan 9 '12 at 18:25

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