4

Assume that we have two classes

public class EntityA
{
    public EntityB EntityB { get; set; }
}

public class EntityB
{
    public string Name { get; set; }
    public bool IsDeleted { get; set; }
}

And two expressions for selector and predicator

Expression<Func<EntityA, EntityB>> selector = c => c.EntityB;
Expression<Func<EntityB, bool>> predicate = c => c.IsDeleted && c.Name == "AAA";

I need write a method that returns composed expression like a

Expression<Func<TSource, bool>> Compose<TPropType>(Expression<Func<TSource, TPropType>> selector, Expression<Func<TPropType, bool>> predicator)
{
    // Expression API ???
}

In my example result should be

Expression<Func<EntityA, bool>> exp = Compose(selector, predicate);

what is equivalent to

Expression<Func<EntityA, bool>> exp = c => c.EntityB.IsDeleted && c.EntityB.Name == "AAA";

Thanks in advance.

  • That last c.Name == "AAA" should be c.EntityB.Name == "AAA", right? – AakashM Jan 10 '12 at 9:58
  • Yes, you are right. Corrected. – qmicron Jan 10 '12 at 11:04
0

You can try the following:

static Expression<Func<TSource, bool>> Compose<TSource, TPropType>(
    Expression<Func<TSource, TPropType>> selector,
    Expression<Func<TPropType, bool>> predicator)
{
    ParameterExpression param = Expression.Parameter(typeof(TSource), "sourceObj");
    Expression invokedSelector = Expression.Invoke(selector, new Expression[] { param });
    Expression invokedPredicate = Expression.Invoke(predicator, new[] { invokedSelector });

    return Expression.Lambda<Func<TSource, bool>>(invokedPredicate, new[] { param });
}

Here's how to use it:

static void Main()
{
    Expression<Func<EntityA, EntityB>> selector = c => c.EntityB;
    Expression<Func<EntityB, bool>> predicate = c => c.IsDeleted && c.Name == "AAA";

    Expression<Func<EntityA, bool>> exp = Compose(selector, predicate);
    System.Console.WriteLine(exp.Compile()(new EntityA()));
}
3

Invoking these lambda expressions is certainly something you do not want to be doing. What you should be doing is rewriting the expressions. You'll just need a way to bind values to the lambda expressions as if you invoked them. To do that, rewrite the bodies of the expressions replacing the parameters with the values you're binding to. You can use this SubstitutionVisitor to help do that:

public class SubstitutionVisitor : ExpressionVisitor
{
    public Expression OldExpr { get; set; }
    public Expression NewExpr { get; set; }

    public override Expression Visit(Expression node)
    {
        return (node == OldExpr) ? NewExpr : base.Visit(node);
    }
}

Given these expressions for example:

Expression<Func<EntityA, EntityB>> selector =
    entityA => entityA.EntityB;
Expression<Func<EntityB, bool>> predicate =
    entityB => entityB.IsDeleted && entityB.Name == "AAA";

The goal is to effectively rewrite it so it becomes like this:

Expression<Func<EntityA, bool>> composed =
    entity => entity.EntityB.IsDeleted && entity.EntityB.Name == "AAA";
static Expression<Func<TSource, bool>> Compose<TSource, TProp>(
    Expression<Func<TSource, TProp>> selector,
    Expression<Func<TProp, bool>> predicate)
{
    var parameter = Expression.Parameter(typeof(TSource), "entity");
    var property = new SubstitutionVisitor
    {
        OldExpr = selector.Parameters.Single(),
        NewExpr = parameter,
    }.Visit(selector.Body);
    var body = new SubstitutionVisitor
    {
        OldExpr = predicate.Parameters.Single(),
        NewExpr = property,
    }.Visit(predicate.Body);
    return Expression.Lambda<Func<TSource, bool>>(body, parameter);
}

To understand what's going on here, here's a line-by-line explanation:

  1. Create a new parameter for the new lambda we're creating.

    entity => ...
    
  2. Given the selector, replace all instances of the original parameter entityA with our new parameter entity from the body of the lambda to obtain the property.

    entityA => entityA.EntityB
    // becomes
    entity.EntityB
    
  3. Given the predicate, replace all instances of the original parameter entityB with previously obtained property entity.EntityB from the body of the lambda to obtain the body of our new lambda.

    entityB => entityB.IsDeleted && entityB.Name == "AAA"
    // becomes
    entity.EntityB.IsDeleted && entity.EntityB.Name == "AAA"
    
  4. Put it all together into the new lambda.

    entity => entity.EntityB.IsDeleted && entity.EntityB.Name == "AAA"
    
  • One more solution is to use LinqKit. In this case Expression<Func<TSource, bool>> output = c => predicate.Invoke(selector.Invoke(c)); – qmicron Jan 16 '12 at 14:48
  • I wouldn't say so. It still compiles and invokes the expressions. If it bound the arguments to the parameters of the lambda, then yes I'd consider it a solution. It's essentially a nicer way to do the other solution. I'm not too familiar with that library but it looks like you need to Expand() that expression to get the results of my solution. – Jeff Mercado Jan 16 '12 at 18:21

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