55

I have two applications.

One is declaring permission and having single Activity:

Part of AndroidManifest.xml

<application
    android:icon="@drawable/ic_launcher"
    android:label="@string/app_name"
    android:permission="your.namespace.permission.TEST" >
    <activity
        android:name=".DeclaringPermissionActivity"
        android:label="@string/app_name" >

        <intent-filter>
            <action android:name="android.intent.action.MAIN" />

            <category android:name="android.intent.category.LAUNCHER" />
        </intent-filter>

        <intent-filter> 
         <action android:name="android.intent.action.VIEW" /> 
         <category android:name="android.intent.category.DEFAULT" /> 
         <category android:name="android.intent.category.BROWSABLE" /> 
         <data android:scheme="myapp"
             android:host="myapp.mycompany.com" /> 
        </intent-filter> 
    </activity>
</application>

The second declares that is uses permission

Part of AndroidManifest.xml

<uses-sdk android:minSdkVersion="10" />
<uses-permission android:name="your.namespace.permission.TEST" />

<application

Part of Activity:

public void onCreate(Bundle savedInstanceState) {
    super.onCreate(savedInstanceState);
    setContentView(R.layout.main);

    startActivity(new Intent(Intent.ACTION_VIEW, Uri.parse("myapp://myapp.mycompany.com/index")));
}

I'm installing the application declaring permission, then I run the second application.

In a result I get security exception:

 01-11 09:46:55.249: E/AndroidRuntime(347): java.lang.RuntimeException: Unable to start activity ComponentInfo{your.namespace2/your.namespace2.UsingPErmissionActivity}: java.lang.SecurityException: Permission Denial: starting Intent { act=android.intent.action.VIEW dat=myapp://myapp.mycompany.com/index cmp=your.namespace/.DeclaringPermissionActivity } from ProcessRecord{407842c0 347:your.namespace2/10082} (pid=347, uid=10082) requires your.namespace.permission.TEST
101

I created a test code you can use it and test your permissions. There are two applications PermissionTestClient which declares permission and protects its activity with this permission. Here is its manifest file:

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8"?>
<manifest xmlns:android="http://schemas.android.com/apk/res/android"
    package="com.testpackage.permissiontestclient"
    android:versionCode="1"
    android:versionName="1.0" >

    <uses-sdk android:minSdkVersion="10" />
    <permission android:name="com.testpackage.mypermission" android:label="my_permission" android:protectionLevel="dangerous"></permission>

    <application
        android:icon="@drawable/ic_launcher"
        android:label="@string/app_name" >
        <activity
            android:permission="com.testpackage.mypermission"
            android:name=".PermissionTestClientActivity"
            android:label="@string/app_name" >
            <intent-filter>
                <action android:name="android.intent.action.MAIN" />

                <category android:name="android.intent.category.LAUNCHER" />
            </intent-filter>

            <intent-filter >
                <action android:name="com.testpackage.permissiontestclient.MyAction" />
                <category android:name="android.intent.category.DEFAULT" />                
            </intent-filter>
        </activity>
    </application>

</manifest>

There is nothing special in Activity file so I will not show it here.

PermissionTestServer application calls activity from PermissionTestClient. Here is its manifest file:

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8"?>

<uses-sdk android:minSdkVersion="10" />
<uses-permission android:name="com.testpackage.mypermission"/>

<application
    android:icon="@drawable/ic_launcher"
    android:label="@string/app_name" >
    <activity
        android:name=".PermissionTestServerActivity"
        android:label="@string/app_name" >
        <intent-filter>
            <action android:name="android.intent.action.MAIN" />

            <category android:name="android.intent.category.LAUNCHER" />
        </intent-filter>
    </activity>
</application>

</manifest>

And Activity:

package com.testpackage.permissiontestserver;

import android.app.Activity;
import android.content.Intent;
import android.os.Bundle;
import android.util.Log;
import android.view.View;
import android.view.View.OnClickListener;
import android.widget.Button;

public class PermissionTestServerActivity extends Activity {
    private static final String TAG = "PermissionTestServerActivity";

    /** Called when the activity is first created. */
    Button btnTest;
    @Override
    public void onCreate(Bundle savedInstanceState) {
        super.onCreate(savedInstanceState);
        setContentView(R.layout.main);

        btnTest = (Button) findViewById(R.id.btnTest);
        btnTest.setOnClickListener(new OnClickListener() {

            @Override
            public void onClick(View v) {
                Log.d(TAG, "Button pressed!");
                Intent in = new Intent();
                in.setAction("com.testpackage.permissiontestclient.MyAction");
                in.addCategory("android.intent.category.DEFAULT");
                startActivity(in);
            }
        });
    }
}

To test it just remove uses-permission from Server application. You'll get security violation error.

  • 2
    Thanks, my mistake was to put permission attribute only to <application> element. – pixel Jan 11 '12 at 9:56
  • This does not work for me when I use android:protectionLevel="signature" in the PermissionTestClient, I use the permission on that apps launcher and get: Permission Denial: starting Intent { act=android.intent.action.MAIN cat=[android.intent.category.LAUNCHER] flg=0x10000000 cmp=my.package.foobar/.DashboardActivity } from null (pid=4070, uid=2000) requires my.custom.permission.ACCESS_ACTIVITY - so the app fails to launch it's own Activity 0_o – fr1550n Jun 27 '13 at 8:54
  • 2
    Signature level of permission means that your client and server should be signed with the same certificate. Try to launch the code using dangerous level and if everything is ok, then try to launch with signature. One more thing, if you use signature I think you need to export a signed apk files and then install them. – Yury Jun 28 '13 at 7:24
  • I would like to inform everybody about a security vulnerabiity related to using custom permissions. See this commonsware post: commonsware.com/blog/2014/02/12/… – Tobrun Jun 5 '14 at 8:21
  • 1
    Don't forget to add android:description = "string resource" attribute while defining your custom permission, this will be helpful while explicitly asking for permissions in marshmallow – VIN Oct 5 '16 at 11:44
31

You need to create a permission in your base app's manifest by declaring it exclusively. For example:

<permission android:name="your.namespace.permission.TEST"
    android:protectionLevel="normal" android:label="This is my custom  permission" />

And later make use of it in your desired app as:

<uses-permission android:name="your.namespace.permission.TEST" />

Note: It is vital to maintain the order in which you install your applications with custom permissions. i.e You must need to install that app first which declares the permission and later install the one which makes use of it. Any disruption in this order may break the usage of custom. permissions.

  • Concise and short and it works. Top voted answer is better but this is exactly what was asked in the question. One note thou, this is ALL you need to use custom permissions, becouse security manager takes care of the rest. – PSIXO Aug 4 '14 at 14:41
  • I cannot get this to work, even when I declare uses-permission in the app that created the permission. It throws security exception at the start – Anshu Dec 23 '14 at 12:42
  • 1
    As long as I remember correctly, the order in which you install the apps matter too. First install the app which declares custom permission and then install the app which uses that custom permission. – waqaslam Dec 23 '14 at 12:48
  • Can we use the custom permission within the application which created the permission? – Bharath Booshan Mar 26 '15 at 19:16
  • 1
    @ToBe never tested on signature level protection, hence can't confirm. – waqaslam Mar 30 '17 at 9:28
2

As mentioned in the answers, you should also take into account the order you install the apps.

this is important because:

if the App that requests the permission (App B) is installed before the App that defines the permission (App A), then there will be no such defined permission in the specific device so the OS won't ask for the permission at all.

later on, when you install the App A and try to run App B, the latter will fail to access the secure component.

One workaround would be to define the same custom permission in both Apps, A and B in order to make sure that the permission exists in the device regardless of which App is installed first, so when the App A is installed, the permission will be already granted to App B.

In that case though, you should make sure that the protection level is the same in both declarations because this can lead to security risk.

(note here that from android 5.0 and on you cannot define the same permission in more than one App, except when those Apps are signed with the same signature key).

1

Defining custom permission is done using <Permission> tag.. Please follow the link below to use user defined permissions in application:

Declaring and Enforcing Permissions

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