36

I have an example class

public class MyClass{

    ActionResult Method1(){
        ....
    } 

    [Authorize]
    ActionResult Method2(){
       ....
    }

    [Authorize]    
    ActionResult Method3(int value){
       ....
    }

}

Now what I want is to write a function returning true/false that can be executed like this

var controller = new MyClass();

Assert.IsFalse(MethodHasAuthorizeAttribute(controller.Method1));
Assert.IsTrue(MethodHasAuthorizeAttribute(controller.Method2));
Assert.IsTrue(MethodHasAuthorizeAttribute(controller.Method3));

I got to the point where

public bool MethodHasAuthorizeAttribute(Func<int, ActionResult> function)
{
    return function.Method.GetCustomAttributes(typeof(AuthorizeAttribute), false).Length > 0;
}

would work for Method3. Now how can I do that generic in a way that it'll take strings and classes as parameters as well?

4
  • Do you want to check whether or not class, method or property has such Attribute within one generic method? Commented Jan 11, 2012 at 10:03
  • Is it that you just want to know if a method has a certain type of attribute applied on it?
    – Rajesh
    Commented Jan 11, 2012 at 10:19
  • I want to check if the method has a particular attribute set but I dont want to pass a method name as a string.
    – 4rchie
    Commented Jan 11, 2012 at 10:30
  • Is this lacking performance? Doing reflection for every api ingress is expensive, is it not? Commented May 13, 2021 at 18:30

5 Answers 5

27

The issue with your code is the signature of public bool MethodHasAuthorizeAttribute(Func<int, ActionResult> function). MethodHasAuthorizeAttribute can only be used with arguments matching the signature of the delegate you specified. In this case a method returning an ActionResult with a parameter of type int.

When you call this method like MethodHasAuthorizeAttribute(controller.Method3), the Compiler will do a method group conversion. This might not always be desired and can yield unexpected results (Method group conversions aren't always straigthforward). If you try to call MethodHasAuthorizeAttribute(controller.Method1) you will get a compiler error because there's no conversion.

A more general solution can be constructed with expression trees and the famous "MethodOf" trick. It employs compiler generated expression trees to find the invocation target:

public static MethodInfo MethodOf( Expression<System.Action> expression )
{
    MethodCallExpression body = (MethodCallExpression)expression.Body;
    return body.Method;
}

You can use it like this, but it can also be used with any method:

MethodInfo method = MethodOf( () => controller.Method3( default( int ) ) );

With that out of the way, we can build a general implementation:

public static bool MethodHasAuthorizeAttribute( Expression<System.Action> expression )
{
    var method = MethodOf( expression );

    const bool includeInherited = false;
    return method.GetCustomAttributes( typeof( AuthorizeAttribute ), includeInherited ).Any();
}

Okay, thats for methods. Now, if you want to apply the Attribute check on classes or fields to (I'll spare properties because they are actually methods), we need to perform our check on MemberInfo, which is the inheritance root for Type, FieldInfo and MethodInfo. This as easy as extracting the Attribute search into a separate method and providing appropriate adapter methods with nice names:

public static bool MethodHasAuthorizeAttribute( Expression<System.Action> expression )
{
    MemberInfo member = MethodOf( expression );
    return MemberHasAuthorizeAttribute( member );
}

public static bool TypeHasAuthorizeAttribute( Type t)
{
    return MemberHasAuthorizeAttribute( t );
}

private static bool MemberHasAuthorizeAttribute( MemberInfo member )
{
    const bool includeInherited = false;
    return member.GetCustomAttributes( typeof( AuthorizeAttribute ), includeInherited ).Any();
}

I'll leave the implementation for fields as an exercise, you can employ the same trick as MethodOf.

2
  • now I can execute MethodHasAuthorizeAttribute(() => Controller.AjaxDashboardNodes(default(TreeViewItem))) I think I could live with those extra chars :)
    – 4rchie
    Commented Jan 11, 2012 at 10:28
  • i've created a new question out of this response, asking how to generalize the solution: stackoverflow.com/questions/41493289/… Commented Jan 5, 2017 at 19:58
14

There is an easier solution availabe compared to the others above with the current .NET/C# version (4.6.1, C#6):

If you only have one one method with that name:

var method = typeof(TestClass).GetMethods()
  .SingleOrDefault(x => x.Name == nameof(TestClass.TestMethod));

var attribute = method?.GetCustomAttributes(typeof(MethodAttribute), true)
  .Single() as MethodAttribute;

Now to check if you have the attribute set on the method:

bool isDefined = attribute != null;

And if you want to access the properties of the attribute, you can do this easy as that:

var someInfo = attribute.SomeMethodInfo

If there are multiple methods with the same name, you can go on and use method.GetParameters() and check for the parameters, instead of .GetMethods().Single...

If you know that your method has no parameters, this check is easy:

var method = typeof(TestClass).GetMethods()
    .SingleOrDefault(
      x => x.Name == nameof(TestClass.TestMethod) 
      && x.GetParameters().Length == 0
);

If not, this is going to be more complicated (checking parameters, etc.) and the other solutions are way easier and robust to use.

So: Use this if you have no overloads for a method, or only want to read attributes from a method with a specified amount of parameters. Else, use the MethodOf provided by other answers in here.

2

I do something like that:

public static bool MethodHasAuthorizeAttribute(this Delegate pMethod, string pRoleAccess)
{
    var mi = pMethod.GetMethodInfo();
    const bool includeInherited = false;
    var atr = mi.GetCustomAttributes(typeof(AuthorizeAttribute), includeInherited)
                .Select(t => (AuthorizeAttribute)t)
                .Where(t => pRoleAccess.Length>0?t.Roles == pRoleAccess:true);
    if (pRoleAccess == String.Empty)
    {
        return !atr.Any();
    }
    else
    {
        return atr.Any();
    }
}

public static bool MethodHasAllowAnonymousAttribute(this Delegate pMethod)
{
    var mi = pMethod.GetMethodInfo();
    const bool includeInherited = false;
    var atr = mi.GetCustomAttributes(typeof(AllowAnonymousAttribute), includeInherited);
    return atr.Any();
}

Calling it follows

Func<string,System.Web.Mvc.ActionResult> func = controller.Login;
bool atrAuthorize = func.MethodHasAuthorizeAttribute(String.Empty);
2

If you make use of FluentAssertions you can do the following:

var classInstance = new MyClass();
Func<ActionResult> method1 = classInstance.Method1;
method1.GetMethodInfo().Should().BeDecoratedWith<AuthorizeAttribute>();

Func<ActionResult> method2 = classInstance.Method2;
method2.GetMethodInfo().Should().BeDecoratedWith<AuthorizeAttribute>();

Func<int, ActionResult> method3 = classInstance.Method3;
method3.GetMethodInfo().Should().BeDecoratedWith<AuthorizeAttribute>();
0

Find some sample where i find the methods in a class that have a specified attribute applied.

private static void GetMethodInfo(object className)
        {
            var methods = className.GetType().GetMethods(BindingFlags.Instance | BindingFlags.Public);

            foreach(var m in methods)
            {
                var parameters = m.GetParameters();
                var att = m.GetCustomAttributes(typeof (CustomAttribute), true);
            }
        }

The parameter that is passed is an instance of a class. You can modify the code to suit your requirement which should be pretty easy.

0

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service and acknowledge you have read our privacy policy.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.