36

I'm attempting to open a Word document, change some text and then save the changes to a new document. I can get the first bit done using the code below but I can't figure out how to save the changes to a NEW document (specifying the path and file name).

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Linq;
using System.Text;
using System.Diagnostics;
using DocumentFormat.OpenXml.Packaging;
using System.IO;

namespace WordTest
{
class Program
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        string template = @"c:\data\hello.docx";
        string documentText;

        using (WordprocessingDocument wordDoc = WordprocessingDocument.Open(template, true))
        {
            using (StreamReader reader = new StreamReader(wordDoc.MainDocumentPart.GetStream()))
            {
                documentText = reader.ReadToEnd();
            }


            documentText = documentText.Replace("##Name##", "Paul");
            documentText = documentText.Replace("##Make##", "Samsung");

            using (StreamWriter writer = new StreamWriter(wordDoc.MainDocumentPart.GetStream(FileMode.Create)))
            {
                writer.Write(documentText);
            }
        }
      }
    }
}

I'm a complete beginner at this, so forgive the basic question!

34

If you use a MemoryStream you can save the changes to a new file like this:

byte[] byteArray = File.ReadAllBytes("c:\\data\\hello.docx");
using (MemoryStream stream = new MemoryStream())
{
    stream.Write(byteArray, 0, (int)byteArray.Length);
    using (WordprocessingDocument wordDoc = WordprocessingDocument.Open(stream, true))
    {
       // Do work here
    }
    // Save the file with the new name
    File.WriteAllBytes("C:\\data\\newFileName.docx", stream.ToArray()); 
}
  • 1
    Good adaptation of what is at docs.microsoft.com/en-us/previous-versions/office/office-12//… . Can also do using (FileStream fileStream = new FileStream("C:\\data\\newFileName.docx", System.IO.FileMode.CreateNew)) { stream.WriteTo(fileStream); } instead of File.WriteAllBytes( ... ) If desiring to just get the bytes, can do byteArray = stream.ToArray(); after the "wordDoc" using block is closed, in the middle. – vapcguy Nov 20 '18 at 19:33
8

In Open XML SDK 2.5:

    File.Copy(originalFilePath, modifiedFilePath);

    using (var wordprocessingDocument = WordprocessingDocument.Open(modifiedFilePath, isEditable: true))
    {
        // Do changes here...
    }

wordprocessingDocument.AutoSave is true by default so Close and Dispose will save changes. wordprocessingDocument.Close is not needed explicitly because the using block will call it.

This approach doesn't require entire file content to be loaded into memory like in accepted answer. It isn't a problem for small files, but in my case I have to process more docx files with embedded xlsx and pdf content at the same time so the memory usage would be quite high.

4

Simply copy the source file to the destination and make changes from there.

File.copy(source,destination);
using (WordprocessingDocument wordDoc = WordprocessingDocument.Open(destination, true))
    {
       \\Make changes to the document and save it.
       WordDoc.MainDocumentPart.Document.Save();
       WordDoc.Close();
    }

Hope this works.

  • 2
    1. It looks like you wanted to write wordDoc.Save(). 2. There is no Save() method. So this doesn't seem like a valid solution to me. Is there anything I'm missing?? – Daniel Gray Sep 30 '14 at 13:48
  • Note that this code MainDocumentPart.Document.Save() won't save the whole package / word document. There are other parts that need to be saved too (my issue was that the footnotes weren't saving, which aren't under the MainDocumentPart). I ended up using the accepted answer rather than trying to work out what bits i needed to call save on. – George Duckett Oct 9 '15 at 14:05
  • For those you have save individually. – Mohamed Alikhan Oct 10 '15 at 6:05
  • In Open XML SDK 2.5 Save doesn't have to be called explicitly, Close and Dispose will save if WordprocessingDocument.AutoSave is true. Close doesn't have to called explicitly either because the using block will call Dispose what in turn will call Close. – user3285954 Mar 31 '16 at 13:39
1

This approach allows you to buffer the "template" file without batching the whole thing into a byte[], perhaps allowing it to be less resource intensive.

var templatePath = @"c:\data\hello.docx";
var documentPath = @"c:\data\newFilename.docx";

using (var template = File.OpenRead(templatePath))
using (var documentStream = File.Open(documentPath, FileMode.OpenOrCreate))
{
    template.CopyTo(documentStream);

    using (var document = WordprocessingDocument.Open(documentStream, true))
    {
        //do your work here

        document.MainDocumentPart.Document.Save();
    }
}
-1

For me this worked fine:

// To search and replace content in a document part.
public static void SearchAndReplace(string document)
{
    using (WordprocessingDocument wordDoc = WordprocessingDocument.Open(document, true))
    {
        string docText = null;
        using (StreamReader sr = new StreamReader(wordDoc.MainDocumentPart.GetStream()))
        {
            docText = sr.ReadToEnd();
        }

        Regex regexText = new Regex("Hello world!");
        docText = regexText.Replace(docText, "Hi Everyone!");

        using (StreamWriter sw = new StreamWriter(wordDoc.MainDocumentPart.GetStream(FileMode.Create)))
        {
            sw.Write(docText);
        }
    }
}
  • 2
    That saves it to the SAME document and therefore does not answer the question. – Alan Macdonald Mar 14 '16 at 14:58

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.