Is it possible to add a TOP or some sort of paging to a SQL Update statement?

I have an UPDATE query, that comes down to something like this:

UPDATE XXX SET XXX.YYY = #TempTable.ZZZ
FROM XXX
INNER JOIN (SELECT SomeFields ... ) #TempTable ON XXX.SomeId=#TempTable.SomeId
WHERE SomeConditions

This update will affect millions of records, and I need to do it in batches. Like 100.000 at the time (the ordering doesn't matter)

What is the easiest way to do this?

up vote 17 down vote accepted

Yes, I believe you can use TOP in an update statement, like so:

UPDATE TOP (10000) XXX SET XXX.YYY = #TempTable.ZZZ
FROM XXX
INNER JOIN (SELECT SomeFields ... ) #TempTable ON XXX.SomeId=#TempTable.SomeId
WHERE SomeConditions
  • 8
    TOP as ordered by what? How does the second batch pick up where the first one finished? – Martin Smith Jan 11 '12 at 14:06
  • One possibility would be to flag each record as it gets updated, and then add another clause ignoring records that have already been updated. This would require temporarily adding a column to the table (unless there is some efficient way to tell if a record has been updated by virtue of the update itself) – ean5533 Jan 11 '12 at 14:08
  • Eh oke that was simple.. I tested with UPDATE TOP 100000, but that gives an Incorrect syntax near 100000, Update TOP (100000) seems to work. @MartinSmith: The 'second batch' doesn't matter in my case. When the first batch is updated, then it won't match the where condition anymore. – Erik Dekker Jan 11 '12 at 14:09
  • 3
    @Martin - the TOP operator does not require an ORDER BY, so presumably in clustered index order. As for having the second batch pick up where the first one left off, you would need something in your WHERE clause to filter out records that have already been updated. Hard to say exactly what that would look like though without knowing more info about his query. – Eric Petroelje Jan 11 '12 at 14:09
  • 1
    @Erik - Yes, oddly the parentheses are required when using TOP in an update (but not in a select..) – Eric Petroelje Jan 11 '12 at 14:11

You can use SET ROWCOUNT { number | @number_var } it limits number of rows processed before stopping the specific query, example below:

SET ROWCOUNT 10000 -- define maximum updated rows at once

UPDATE XXX SET 
    XXX.YYY = #TempTable.ZZZ
FROM XXX
INNER JOIN (SELECT SomeFields ... ) #TempTable ON XXX.SomeId = #TempTable.SomeId
WHERE XXX.YYY <> #TempTable.ZZZ and OtherConditions

-- don't forget about bellow 
-- after everything is updated
SET ROWCOUNT 0

I've added XXX.YYY <> #TempTable.ZZZ to where clause to make sure you will not update twice already updated value.

Setting ROWCOUNT to 0 turn off limits - don't forget about it.

  • Also a good and working answer, but I can accept only one. The other answer is the shortest and fastest way to do what I want. – Erik Dekker Jan 12 '12 at 10:17
  • 2
    SET ROWCOUNT is deprecated for limiting UPDATE, INSERT and DELETE statements. From SQL 2005 onwards, one should rather use TOP. – Jim Jul 11 '13 at 13:12
  • above comment is helpful; here is some support for that: sqlstudies.com/2013/10/07/use-top-instead-of-set-rowcount – jacoblambert Oct 5 '16 at 13:30

Depending on your ability to change the datastructure of the table, I would suggest that you add a field to your table that can hold some sort of batch-identificator. Ie. it can be a date-stamp if you do it daily, an incremenal value or basically any value that you can make unique for your batch. If you take the incremental approach, your update will then be:

UPDATE TOP (100000) XXX SET XXX.BATCHID = 1, XXX.YYY = ....
...
WHERE XXX.BATCHID < 1 
  AND (rest of WHERE-clause here).

Next time, you'll set the BATCHID = 2 and WHERE XXX.BATCHID < 2

If this is to be done repeatedly, you can set an index on the BATCHID and reduce load on the server.

You can do something like the following

declare @i int = 1
while @i <= 10 begin

    UPDATE  top (10) percent
            masterTable set colToUpdate = lt.valCol
    from    masterTable as mt
            inner join lookupTable as lt
                    on mt.colKey = lt.colKey
    where colToUpdate is null

    print @i
    set @i += 1
end

--one final update without TOP (assuming lookupTable.valCol is mostly not null)
UPDATE  --top (10) percent
        masterTable set colToUpdate = lt.valCol
from    masterTable as mt
        inner join lookupTable as lt
                on mt.colKey = lt.colKey            
where colToUpdate is null

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