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I am getting a wrong answer when I wrote a code to solve Prob 17 in Project Euler. I am outputting every string to make the count more clear.

The link is posted here: http://codepad.org/wE54t7Qi

Can someone help me to determine where the problem is?

map<long int, string> CharNumberValue;

int main()
{

CharNumberValue[0] ="zero";
CharNumberValue[1] ="one";
CharNumberValue[2] ="two";
CharNumberValue[3] ="three";
CharNumberValue[4] ="four";
CharNumberValue[5] ="five";
CharNumberValue[6] ="six";
CharNumberValue[7] ="seven";
CharNumberValue[8] ="eight";
CharNumberValue[9] ="nine";
CharNumberValue[10] ="ten";
CharNumberValue[11] ="eleven";
CharNumberValue[12] ="twelve";
CharNumberValue[13] ="thirteen";
CharNumberValue[14] ="fourteen";
CharNumberValue[15] ="fifteen";
CharNumberValue[16] ="sixteen";
CharNumberValue[17] ="seventeen";
CharNumberValue[18] ="eighteen";
CharNumberValue[19] ="nineteen";
CharNumberValue[20] ="twenty";
CharNumberValue[30] ="thirty";
CharNumberValue[40] ="forty";
CharNumberValue[50] ="fifty";
CharNumberValue[60] ="sixty";
CharNumberValue[70] ="seventy";
CharNumberValue[80] ="eighty";
CharNumberValue[90] ="ninety";
CharNumberValue[100] ="hundred";//Sameer,remember 100 is one hundred
CharNumberValue[1000] ="thousand";//Sameer,remember 1000 is one thousand

  long int count = 0; 
  string printword ="";

for(int i=1; i< 1000; i++)
{

    if(i<=100)
    {
        int ten = (i/10)*10;
        int unit = i%10;    
        map<long int, string>:: iterator it = CharNumberValue.find(i);
        map<long int, string>:: iterator it1 = CharNumberValue.find(unit);
        map<long int, string>:: iterator it2 = CharNumberValue.find(ten);

        if(i<10)
        {
            count  += it1->second.length();
            printword = it1->second;
            cout<<printword<<endl;
        }
        if(i>=10 && i<=20)
        {
            count  += it->second.length();//These are unique
            printword = it->second;
            cout<<printword<<endl;
        }
        if(i>20 && i<=100) 
        {

            count  += it2->second.length();
            printword = it2->second ;
            if ((i != 30)&&(i != 40)&&(i != 50)&&(i != 60)&&(i != 70)&&(i != 80)&&(i!= 90)&&(i!= 100))
            {
                count  += it1->second.length();
                printword = it2->second + " " + it1->second ;

            }
            cout<<printword<<endl;              
        }           

    }
    if(i>100 && i<1000)
    {
        int hun = i/100;
        int ten=i%100;
        int mten = (ten/10)*10;//modified ten
        int unit = ten%10;

        map<long int, string>:: iterator it = CharNumberValue.find(unit);
        map<long int, string>:: iterator it1 = CharNumberValue.find(mten);          
        map<long int, string>:: iterator it2 = CharNumberValue.find(ten);
        map<long int, string>:: iterator it3 = CharNumberValue.find(hun);           
        int counttemp = CharNumberValue[100].length();
        count  += it3->second.length() + CharNumberValue[100].length();
        printword = it3->second + " " + CharNumberValue[100];

        if((i != 200)&&(i != 300)&&(i != 400)&&(i != 500)&&(i != 600)&&(i != 700)&&(i != 800)&&(i != 900))
        {
            if( ten<=20)
            {
                count  += 3/*for and */+ it2->second.length()   ;//These are unique
                printword = it3->second + " " + CharNumberValue[100]  + " and "  + it2->second ;
                cout<<printword<<endl;
            }

            if(ten>20 && ten<=99) 
            {
                count  += 3/*for and */+ it1->second.length();
                printword = it3->second + " " + CharNumberValue[100]  + " and "  + it1->second;
                if ((ten != 30)&&(ten != 40)&&(ten != 50)&&(ten != 60)&&(ten != 70)&&(ten != 80)&&(ten!= 90)&&(ten!= 100))
                {
                    count  += it->second.length();
                    printword = it3->second + " " + CharNumberValue[100]  + " and "  + it1->second +" "+ it->second ;
                }

                cout<<printword<<endl;
            }

        }
        else
        {
            cout<<printword<<endl;
        }
    }
}
count += 11;//for one thousand
cout<< count;

return 0;
}
21
  • 2
    Please include code in the question.
    – palacsint
    Jan 11 '12 at 15:43
  • It probably would be beneficial if you put the count of each entry next to its output that way you can verify total is correct.
    – Casey
    Jan 11 '12 at 16:15
  • I have no time for a complete code-review but I do know the answer of that problem. Do you want the answer to any of these questions : what is the answer ? Am I far from the right answer ? Is my answer too big or too small ?
    – SylvainD
    Jan 11 '12 at 16:50
  • @Josay: I want my code to generate the right answer.
    – Sam
    Jan 11 '12 at 16:59
  • 1
    @SameerShah, a logical glitch is a flaw your the code. Code Review is strictly for working code. We improve code in other ways such as style/performance not correctness. Jan 12 '12 at 15:13
3

You're outputting "hundred" instead of "one hundred".

6
  • I know but I did add count +=11 for that. Is that incorrect?
    – Sam
    Jan 11 '12 at 15:46
  • Ah, sorry, I missed that. But why didn't you just loop until <= 1000 ?
    – seand
    Jan 11 '12 at 15:50
  • I am actually developing a function to count words for larger numbers too. But for answer purposes I just added 11. Do you think I am making mistake there?
    – Sam
    Jan 11 '12 at 16:12
  • No, it's fine. I edited my post with the solution... that was annoying to track down.
    – seand
    Jan 11 '12 at 17:34
  • This should lead to the right answer. Good job.
    – SylvainD
    Jan 11 '12 at 17:51
2
  • You can simplify most of the tests containing enumeration of cases :

    if ((i != 30)&&(i != 40)&&(i != 50)&&(i != 60)&&(i != 70)&&(i != 80)&&(i!= 90)&&(i!= 100))
    

    As (i>20 && i<=100), you can just check if i is a multiple of 10 (using variable unit for instance)

    if((i != 200)&&(i != 300)&&(i != 400)&&(i != 500)&&(i != 600)&&(i != 700)&&(i != 800)&&(i != 900))
    

    As (i>100 && i<1000), you can just check if i is a multiple of 100

    if ((ten != 30)&&(ten != 40)&&(ten != 50)&&(ten != 60)&&(ten != 70)&&(ten != 80)&&(ten!= 90)&&(ten!= 100))
    

    As (ten>20 && ten<=99), you can just check if ten is a multiple of 10.

  • More generally, the shorter your code is, the easier it will be to find a mistake. This includes removing useless tests (a few of the conditions above were useless because of the bounds of the variables), removing duplicate code, etc.

1
  • I agree.Thanks Josay. Let me try this.
    – Sam
    Jan 11 '12 at 22:22

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