222

How can I send the HTML content in an email using Python? I can send simple text.

359

From Python v2.7.14 documentation - 18.1.11. email: Examples:

Here’s an example of how to create an HTML message with an alternative plain text version:

#! /usr/bin/python

import smtplib

from email.mime.multipart import MIMEMultipart
from email.mime.text import MIMEText

# me == my email address
# you == recipient's email address
me = "my@email.com"
you = "your@email.com"

# Create message container - the correct MIME type is multipart/alternative.
msg = MIMEMultipart('alternative')
msg['Subject'] = "Link"
msg['From'] = me
msg['To'] = you

# Create the body of the message (a plain-text and an HTML version).
text = "Hi!\nHow are you?\nHere is the link you wanted:\nhttp://www.python.org"
html = """\
<html>
  <head></head>
  <body>
    <p>Hi!<br>
       How are you?<br>
       Here is the <a href="http://www.python.org">link</a> you wanted.
    </p>
  </body>
</html>
"""

# Record the MIME types of both parts - text/plain and text/html.
part1 = MIMEText(text, 'plain')
part2 = MIMEText(html, 'html')

# Attach parts into message container.
# According to RFC 2046, the last part of a multipart message, in this case
# the HTML message, is best and preferred.
msg.attach(part1)
msg.attach(part2)

# Send the message via local SMTP server.
s = smtplib.SMTP('localhost')
# sendmail function takes 3 arguments: sender's address, recipient's address
# and message to send - here it is sent as one string.
s.sendmail(me, you, msg.as_string())
s.quit()
  • 1
    Is it possible to attach a third and a fourth part, both of which are attachments (one ASCII, one binary)? How would one do that? Thanks. – Hamish Grubijan Dec 5 '10 at 20:55
  • Hi, I noticed that in the end you quit the s object. What if I want to send multiple messages? Should I quit everytime I send the message or send them all (in a for loop) and then quit once and for all? – xpanta May 9 '12 at 9:58
  • Make sure to attach html last, as the preferred(showing) part will be the one attached last. # According to RFC 2046, the last part of a multipart message, in this case # the HTML message, is best and preferred. I wish i read this 2hrs ago – dwkd Jul 4 '15 at 21:44
  • This doesn't work when we have css classes defined wrapped in Style tag I have created a sample HTML here : pastebin.com/QFKLyBJz – Kartik Domadiya Jul 14 '15 at 4:29
  • 1
    Warning: this fails if you have non-ascii characters in the text. – guettli Apr 4 '16 at 8:23
57

You might try using my mailer module.

from mailer import Mailer
from mailer import Message

message = Message(From="me@example.com",
                  To="you@example.com")
message.Subject = "An HTML Email"
message.Html = """<p>Hi!<br>
   How are you?<br>
   Here is the <a href="http://www.python.org">link</a> you wanted.</p>"""

sender = Mailer('smtp.example.com')
sender.send(message)
  • Wow, that's a lot simpler than smtplib. I guess the advantage of smtplib is that it's shipped with most Python distributions. I think you need to push to have Mailer shipped in Debian! – Jeremy Visser Aug 13 '09 at 12:45
  • Mailer module is great however it claims to work with Gmail, but doesn't and there are no docs. – MFB Jul 18 '12 at 19:24
  • 1
    @MFB -- Have you tried the Bitbucket repo? bitbucket.org/ginstrom/mailer – Ryan Ginstrom Aug 16 '12 at 4:11
  • @JeremyVisser that's what pip is for – Anentropic Dec 11 '13 at 11:29
  • 2
    For gmail one should provide use_tls=True,usr='email' and pwd='password' when initializing Mailer and it will work. – ToonAlfrink Jul 21 '14 at 8:21
43

Here is a Gmail implementation of the accepted answer:

import smtplib

from email.mime.multipart import MIMEMultipart
from email.mime.text import MIMEText

# me == my email address
# you == recipient's email address
me = "my@email.com"
you = "your@email.com"

# Create message container - the correct MIME type is multipart/alternative.
msg = MIMEMultipart('alternative')
msg['Subject'] = "Link"
msg['From'] = me
msg['To'] = you

# Create the body of the message (a plain-text and an HTML version).
text = "Hi!\nHow are you?\nHere is the link you wanted:\nhttp://www.python.org"
html = """\
<html>
  <head></head>
  <body>
    <p>Hi!<br>
       How are you?<br>
       Here is the <a href="http://www.python.org">link</a> you wanted.
    </p>
  </body>
</html>
"""

# Record the MIME types of both parts - text/plain and text/html.
part1 = MIMEText(text, 'plain')
part2 = MIMEText(html, 'html')

# Attach parts into message container.
# According to RFC 2046, the last part of a multipart message, in this case
# the HTML message, is best and preferred.
msg.attach(part1)
msg.attach(part2)
# Send the message via local SMTP server.
mail = smtplib.SMTP('smtp.gmail.com', 587)

mail.ehlo()

mail.starttls()

mail.login('userName', 'password')
mail.sendmail(me, you, msg.as_string())
mail.quit()
  • 1
    Great code, it works for me, if i turned on low security in google – Tovask Jun 25 '15 at 12:49
  • 13
    I use a google application specific password with python smtplib, did the trick without having to go low security. – yoyo Jun 30 '15 at 22:48
  • 2
    for anyone reading the above comments: You only require an "App Password" if you have previously enabled 2 step verification in your Gmail account. – Mugen Oct 11 '18 at 16:21
32

Here is a simple way to send an HTML email, just by specifying the Content-Type header as 'text/html':

import email.message
import smtplib

msg = email.message.Message()
msg['Subject'] = 'foo'
msg['From'] = 'sender@test.com'
msg['To'] = 'recipient@test.com'
msg.add_header('Content-Type','text/html')
msg.set_payload('Body of <b>message</b>')

# Send the message via local SMTP server.
s = smtplib.SMTP('localhost')
s.starttls()
s.login(email_login,
        email_passwd)
s.sendmail(msg['From'], [msg['To']], msg.as_string())
s.quit()
  • 2
    This is a nice simple answer, handy for quick and dirty scripts, thanks. BTW one can refer to the accepted answer for a simple smtplib.SMTP() example, which doesn't use tls. I used this for an internal script at work where we use ssmtp and a local mailhub. Also, this example is missing s.quit(). – Mike S Sep 2 '15 at 14:42
  • 1
    "mailmerge_conf.smtp_server" is not defined... at least is what Python 3.6 says... – ZEE Dec 27 '17 at 20:47
  • i got error when using list based recepients AttributeError: 'list' object has no attribute 'lstrip' any solution ? – navotera Jan 29 '18 at 8:50
10

Here's sample code. This is inspired from code found on the Python Cookbook site (can't find the exact link)

def createhtmlmail (html, text, subject, fromEmail):
    """Create a mime-message that will render HTML in popular
    MUAs, text in better ones"""
    import MimeWriter
    import mimetools
    import cStringIO

    out = cStringIO.StringIO() # output buffer for our message 
    htmlin = cStringIO.StringIO(html)
    txtin = cStringIO.StringIO(text)

    writer = MimeWriter.MimeWriter(out)
    #
    # set up some basic headers... we put subject here
    # because smtplib.sendmail expects it to be in the
    # message body
    #
    writer.addheader("From", fromEmail)
    writer.addheader("Subject", subject)
    writer.addheader("MIME-Version", "1.0")
    #
    # start the multipart section of the message
    # multipart/alternative seems to work better
    # on some MUAs than multipart/mixed
    #
    writer.startmultipartbody("alternative")
    writer.flushheaders()
    #
    # the plain text section
    #
    subpart = writer.nextpart()
    subpart.addheader("Content-Transfer-Encoding", "quoted-printable")
    pout = subpart.startbody("text/plain", [("charset", 'us-ascii')])
    mimetools.encode(txtin, pout, 'quoted-printable')
    txtin.close()
    #
    # start the html subpart of the message
    #
    subpart = writer.nextpart()
    subpart.addheader("Content-Transfer-Encoding", "quoted-printable")
    #
    # returns us a file-ish object we can write to
    #
    pout = subpart.startbody("text/html", [("charset", 'us-ascii')])
    mimetools.encode(htmlin, pout, 'quoted-printable')
    htmlin.close()
    #
    # Now that we're done, close our writer and
    # return the message body
    #
    writer.lastpart()
    msg = out.getvalue()
    out.close()
    print msg
    return msg

if __name__=="__main__":
    import smtplib
    html = 'html version'
    text = 'TEST VERSION'
    subject = "BACKUP REPORT"
    message = createhtmlmail(html, text, subject, 'From Host <sender@host.com>')
    server = smtplib.SMTP("smtp_server_address","smtp_port")
    server.login('username', 'password')
    server.sendmail('sender@host.com', 'target@otherhost.com', message)
    server.quit()
3

Actually, yagmail took a bit different approach.

It will by default send HTML, with automatic fallback for incapable email-readers. It is not the 17th century anymore.

Of course, it can be overridden, but here goes:

import yagmail
yag = yagmail.SMTP("me@example.com", "mypassword")

html_msg = """<p>Hi!<br>
              How are you?<br>
              Here is the <a href="http://www.python.org">link</a> you wanted.</p>"""

yag.send("to@example.com", "the subject", html_msg)

For installation instructions and many more great features, have a look at the github.

3

Here's a working example to send plain text and HTML emails from Python using smtplib along with the CC and BCC options.

https://varunver.wordpress.com/2017/01/26/python-smtplib-send-plaintext-and-html-emails/

#!/usr/bin/env python
import smtplib
from email.mime.multipart import MIMEMultipart
from email.mime.text import MIMEText

def send_mail(params, type_):
      email_subject = params['email_subject']
      email_from = "from_email@domain.com"
      email_to = params['email_to']
      email_cc = params.get('email_cc')
      email_bcc = params.get('email_bcc')
      email_body = params['email_body']

      msg = MIMEMultipart('alternative')
      msg['To'] = email_to
      msg['CC'] = email_cc
      msg['Subject'] = email_subject
      mt_html = MIMEText(email_body, type_)
      msg.attach(mt_html)

      server = smtplib.SMTP('YOUR_MAIL_SERVER.DOMAIN.COM')
      server.set_debuglevel(1)
      toaddrs = [email_to] + [email_cc] + [email_bcc]
      server.sendmail(email_from, toaddrs, msg.as_string())
      server.quit()

# Calling the mailer functions
params = {
    'email_to': 'to_email@domain.com',
    'email_cc': 'cc_email@domain.com',
    'email_bcc': 'bcc_email@domain.com',
    'email_subject': 'Test message from python library',
    'email_body': '<h1>Hello World</h1>'
}
for t in ['plain', 'html']:
    send_mail(params, t)
  • Think this answer covers everything. Great link – stingMantis Oct 24 '17 at 17:02
0

Here is my answer for AWS using boto3

    subject = "Hello"
    html = "<b>Hello Consumer</b>"

    client = boto3.client('ses', region_name='us-east-1', aws_access_key_id="your_key",
                      aws_secret_access_key="your_secret")

client.send_email(
    Source='ACME <do-not-reply@acme.com>',
    Destination={'ToAddresses': [email]},
    Message={
        'Subject': {'Data': subject},
        'Body': {
            'Html': {'Data': html}
        }
    }
0

Simplest solution for sending email from Organizational account in Office 365:

from O365 import Message

html_template =     """ 
            <html>
            <head>
                <title></title>
            </head>
            <body>
                    {}
            </body>
            </html>
        """

final_html_data = html_template.format(df.to_html(index=False))

o365_auth = ('sender_username@company_email.com','Password')
m = Message(auth=o365_auth)
m.setRecipients('receiver_username@company_email.com')
m.setSubject('Weekly report')
m.setBodyHTML(final)
m.sendMessage()

here df is a dataframe converted to html Table, which is being injected to html_template

protected by Kermit Feb 21 '14 at 19:44

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