53

I've got a <div>, that's a certain height and width, and overflow:hidden so that specfic inner images are clipped; however I want one image in the <div> to pop out of the border (ie to override the overflow:hidden), how do I do this?

  • 4
    The fact that this cannot be achieved is, I think, a shortcoming of current HTML rendering capability. – Lisa Jul 25 '12 at 1:54
  • Almost identical question: stackoverflow.com/questions/8432883/… – Lisa Jul 25 '12 at 2:04
  • @Lisa I agree, I wish there was a way to exclude an element from any overflow! – webkit Nov 2 '14 at 8:25
  • and now I am truly stuck, because I can't use absolute positioning and overflow is clipping my form! – Samia Ruponti Dec 5 '14 at 20:24

11 Answers 11

86

The trick is to keep the overflow:hidden element with position:static and position the overflowing element relative to a higher parent (rather than the overflow:hidden parent). Like so:

.relative-wrap {
    /*relative on second parent*/
    position: relative;
}

.overflow-wrap {
    height: 250px;
    width: 250px;
    overflow: hidden;
    background: lightblue;
    
    /*no relative on immediate parent*/
}

.respect-overflow {
    position: relative;
    top: 75px;
    left: 225px;
    height: 50px;
    width: 50px;
    background: green;    
}
.no-overflow {
    position: absolute;
    top: 150px;
    left: 225px;
    height: 50px;
    width: 50px;
    background: red;
}
<div class="relative-wrap">
    
    <div class="overflow-wrap">
        
        <div class="respect-overflow">
        
        </div>
        <div class="no-overflow">
            
        </div>
        
    </div>
    
</div>

I also want to note, a very common use case for the desire to have an element overflow its container in this way is when you want animate the height of a dropdown or container from X to 0, and therefore need to have overflow: hidden on the container. Usually you have something inside the container that you want to overflow regardless. Since these elements are only accessibly when the container is "open", you can take advantage and set the overflow back to visible after the container is fully open, and then set it back to hidden before trying to animate the container back to height: 0.

18

I know this is an old post, but this can be done (at least in Chrome). I figured this out about two years ago and it's saved me a couple times.

Set the child to have position of fixed and use margins instead of top and left to position it.

#wrapper {
    width: 5px;
    height: 5px;
    border: 1px solid #000;
    overflow: hidden;
}

#parent {
    position: relative;
}

button {
    position: fixed;
    margin: 10px 0px 0px 30px;
}

Here is an example: http://jsfiddle.net/senica/Cupmb/

  • Hey this seems to work great in Chrome, Firefox and Safari - I'll try it out in IE. Thanks for the hack. – Iain Collins Oct 29 '13 at 22:00
  • Unfortunately this does not work in IE (version 10). It would have been really neat. – Ingo Kegel Nov 13 '13 at 10:33
  • 13
    nice, but if you set position:fixed, it will be fixed - the button will stay on the same place while scrolling the page... – betatester07 Feb 26 '15 at 22:14
  • nice! works in IE 11. – parliament Apr 15 '15 at 20:32
  • This doesn't seem to work if #wrapper has a transform set – Luke Taylor Mar 2 '18 at 17:09
7

All given answers where not satisfying for me. They are all hackish in my opinion and difficult to implement in complex layouts.

So here is a simple solution:

Once a parent has a certain overflow, there is no way to let its children override this.

If a child needs to override the parent overflow, then a child can have a different overflow than the other children.

So define the overflow on each child instead of declaring it on the parent:

<div class="panel">
    <div class="outer">
        <div class="inner" style="background-color: red;">
            <div>
                title
            </div>

            <div>                     
                some content
            </div>
        </div>    
    </div>  
</div>

.outer {
    position: relative;
    overflow: hidden;
}    

.outer:hover {
    overflow: visible;
}  

.inner:hover {
    position: absolute;
}

Here is a fiddle:

http://jsfiddle.net/ryojeg1b/1/

  • works perfect, grazie! – avalanche1 Nov 6 '15 at 13:24
  • Very clean solution – kursus Oct 8 '18 at 12:50
  • sadly not appropriate for e.g. scrollable containers – AlexFoxGill Dec 4 '18 at 14:59
3

You cannot, unless you change your HTML layout and move that image out of the parent div. A little more context would help you find an acceptable solution.

3

Wrap your overflow: hidden div with another div that has a css property of -

transform: translate(0, 0);

and in your specefic tag that you want it to override the - overflow: hidden , set it with -

position: fixed; it will continue to be position relatively to its parent

i.e -

.section {
    ...
    transform: translate(0, 0);
}

.not-hidden {
    position: fixed;
    ...
}

See the fiddle here

  • 1
    WOW is this brilliant, however for different reasons. You do not actually need the transform and you can change position fixed to absolute. Rather the actual way this works is by the simple fact that an element is clipped in accordance to the ancestor to which it is positioned by which is not necessarily always the parent element in the case of position absolute in fixed where the element is instead positioned to the nearest position relative. Thus, you can have (an) element(s) in between relative and absolute that is overflow hidden. – Jack Giffin Mar 30 '18 at 4:07
2

All the above is nice but nothing beats JAVASCRIPT. (Using jquery). So,

<script>
var element = $('#myID');
var pos = element.offset();
var height = element.height(); // optional
element.appendTo($('body')); // optional
element.css({
    position : 'fixed'
}).offset(pos).height(height);
</script>

What I do is, get the original position of the element (relative to the page), optionally get the height or width, optionally append the element to the body, apply the new css rule position : fixed and finally apply the original position and optionally width and height.

  • I don't normally downvote people, but I just gota downvote this. This is a flat out terrible approach to web page programming. Coding gurus at Google and Mozilla spend eternity perfecting the SIMID driven CSS internals. You simply cannot beat just letting the browser do the work. Instead of going all javascript, you should move as much of the processing as possible to the CSS. Doing so is, because of the reasons listed above, the best approach to webpage programming. Also, don't use JQuery. – Jack Giffin Dec 13 '17 at 3:29
  • No hard feelings. Opinions are like noses. Everyone has one. IMHO it is just another way to solve the problem. JQuery is just that. Another way to solve problems. Happy new year. – Αλέκος Dec 14 '17 at 9:10
  • I will +1 because it's a solution to a problem that in some circumstances does not have a solution. Obviously when the "coding gurus" at Google and Mozilla give us a CSS solution this one will no longer be needed. (That said, I will avoid using it.) – Jeremy A. West Dec 20 '17 at 16:54
  • This solution can be handy when you don't have full control over existing HTML and CSS (e.g. you're making a dropdown plugin). One tweak -- if you set position: absolute (instead of fixed), it has the same effect but also works when the user scrolls the page. – SMX Aug 22 '18 at 17:42
  • I'll also +1 @SMX 's comment. using this technique in a wordpress plugin can be very handy when you don't have access or even know parent elements. – Peter Gibbons Sep 12 '18 at 18:58
2

You can overflow an element out of the div by wrapping it in another div, then set your image as position:absolute; and offset it using margins.

<div class="no-overflow">
<div>
<img class="escape" src="wherever.jpg" />
</div>
</div>

.no-overflow{
overflow:hidden;
width: 500px
height: 100px
}

.escape{
position: absolute;
margin-bottom: -150px;
}

Example (tested in firefox + IE10) http://jsfiddle.net/Ps76J/

1

There is currently no way I am aware of to make a parent node with overflow hidden have children visible outside it (with the exception of position:fixed children).

HOWEVER, it is possible to instead of using overflow, you can just use the outline property set to the color of the background combined with the z-index property to mask some elements while retaining others like so.

.persuado-overflow-hidden {
 /*gives the appearance of overflow:hidden*/
  z-index: -100;
  position: relative;
  outline: 1000vw solid white;
  overflow: visible;
}
.overridevisible {
/*takes the element out of the persuado overflow hidden*/
  z-index: 1;
}
/*does the other styling to the text*/
.loremcontainer {
  width: 60vw;
  height: 60vh;
  margin: 20vw;
  border: 1px solid;
}
.loremtxt {
  width: 100vw;
  height: 100vh;
  margin: -20vh;
  z-index: -1;
}
.positionmessage {
  z-index: 100;
  position: absolute;
  top: -12vh;
  left: -5vw;
  right: -5vw;
  color: red;
}
<div class="persuado-overflow-hidden loremcontainer">
<div class="loremtxt">
<div class="overridevisible positionmessage">Then, theres this text outside the paragraphs inside the persuado overflow:hidden element</div>
Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Fusce porta lorem lorem, eu dapibus libero laoreet et. Fusce finibus, felis ac condimentum commodo, mauris felis dictum sapien, pellentesque tincidunt dui dolor id nulla. Etiam vulputate turpis eu lectus ornare, in condimentum purus feugiat. Donec ultricies lacinia urna, sit amet ultrices magna accumsan ut. Suspendisse potenti. Maecenas nisl nibh, accumsan vel sodales in, rutrum at sem. Suspendisse elit urna, luctus vitae urna ut, convallis ultricies tellus. Ut aliquet auctor neque, nec ullamcorper tortor ullamcorper vitae. Fusce at pharetra ante. Aliquam sollicitudin id ante sit amet sagittis. Suspendisse id neque quis nisi mattis vulputate. Donec sollicitudin pharetra tempus. Integer congue leo mi, et fermentum massa malesuada nec.
</div>
</div>

0

overflow refers to the container not allowing oversized content to be displayed (when set to hidden). It's got nothing to do with inner elements that can have overflow:whatever, and still wont' be displayed.

-2

Z-index doesnt seem to work, but here I have a workaround which worked fine for me, as I needed overflow only to be "visible" when hovering a child element:

#parent {
   overflow: hidden;
}

#parent:hover {
   overflow: visible;
}
  • 2
    This doesn't answer the question... at all. – Jack Giffin Dec 12 '17 at 20:59
-2

I've got a super-easy solution to this problem: Use the "pre" tag. I know the pre tag is the equivalent of using "goto" in programming, but hey: it works!

<div style="overflow: hidden; width: 200px;">
  <pre style="overflow: auto;">
    super long text which just goes on and on and on and on and one, etc.
  </pre>
</div>

  • 1
    This doesn't remotely work. If you run the code snippet the only reason you can see all the text is that the div is wider than the content. If you set width: 200px on the div, the content inside the pre tag will get cut off as expected by the overflow: hidden property. – Tim Barclay Mar 20 '18 at 15:44
  • My apologies, I forgot to add a “style” attribute to the “pre” tag. Now the scroll-bar will appear. I wonder if I am miss-understanding the OP’s question? I thought the problem was: there’s an outer element with “overflow: hidden” but an inner element needs to not wrap. The “pre” tag allows this to happen. If an image is placed inside the “pre” tag, the entire image will display (you still need to use the scroll-bar); without the “pre” tag, the image will be chopped (you cannot see the entire image). – David Jensen Mar 21 '18 at 18:25
  • But now I think the OP was actually asking about can an inner element “escape” and extend beyond the boundaries of the outer element… in-which case the “pre” tag solution will not work. But remember, the “pre” tag solution does allow the entire contains to be viewed instead of chopped (which is hopefully an acceptable solution). Thanks. – David Jensen Mar 21 '18 at 18:26
  • As a side note, we use this solution when two very long lines of text need to be compared to each other (visually, by a human). When a line of text wraps, it is very difficult to compare it with another. Angular Material has containers with “overflow: hidden” and the “pre” solution was the only thing which worked for us. – David Jensen Mar 21 '18 at 18:27
  • If I understand what you're trying to achieve with this, wouldn't white-space: nowrap; achieve the same thing without unnecessarily rendering text in monospace font? – Tim Barclay Mar 22 '18 at 15:13

Your Answer

By clicking "Post Your Answer", you acknowledge that you have read our updated terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy, and that your continued use of the website is subject to these policies.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.