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I need to know if it is possible to do this. I have an MVC app where I loop through some data and output a form for each object. On the form submit for an item, it posts to the server and returns an updated view. I want to replace the current html with the new view data.

The problem is I cannot figure out how to get a parent, child or specific element within the context of the form that was submitted on the Success function. I've also tried $(this).parent, $(this).child etc. Its seeing the form as an object, not an html element so I guess these query functions are not working on it.

Is it possible to do this or do I need to add some type of hack where I can just get a unique element id in the Success function, instead of trying to use $(this)?

<script type="text/javascript">
    $(function () {
        $("#form").live("submit", function (e) {
            $.post($(this).attr("action"),
                $(this).serialize(),
                function (response) {
                    var form = $(this);
                    var container = $("#itemContainer", form);
                    container.html(response);
                });
            e.preventDefault();
        });
    });
</script>
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<script type="text/javascript">
    $(function () {
        $("#form").live("submit", function (e) {
            $.post($(this).attr("action"),
                $(this).serialize(),
                $.proxy( function (response) {
                    var form = $(this);
                    var container = $("#itemContainer", form);
                    container.html(response);
                }, this ) );
            e.preventDefault();
        });
    });
</script>

jQuery.proxy

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You could capture this in a closure:

var $form = $(this);
$.post($(this).attr("action"), $(this).serialize(), function (response) {
    // $form was captured in a closure here
    var container = $("#itemContainer", $form);
    container.html(response);
});

or if you replace your $.post with $.ajax you could pass a context to the success callback:

$.ajax({
    url: $(this).attr("action"),
    type: 'POST',
    data: $(this).serialize(),
    context: $(this),
    success: function(response) {
        // At this stage "this" is the original form as we 
        // passed it using the context parameter
        var container = $("#itemContainer", this); 
        container.html(response);
    }
});
  • This works as well, thanks. Upvoted. – Jason Gerstorff Jan 12 '12 at 18:56
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If you want to find an element that is the child of your form use

form.find("input") //this will search only inside your form

or

 form.children() //this will get all the elements inside the form

The reason form.child or form.parent is not working is because you are not working an element. You are working with a jQuery object.

Look at http://api.jquery.com/category/traversing/ and you can see all the different ways you can traverse the DOM once you have a jQuery object.

Also, unless your form is loaded via AJAX you do not need to use the deprecated function $.live

<script type="text/javascript">
$(function () {
    $("#form").submit(function (e) {
        var form = $(this);
        $.post(form.attr("action"),
            form.serialize(),
            function (response) {
                var children = form.children();
                var container = $("#itemContainer", form);
                container.html(response);
            });
        e.preventDefault();
    });
});

  • I have multiple forms named "#form". When I called $("#form").submit() it only attached the event to the first one. That was why I used .live, but did not know it was deprecated. – Jason Gerstorff Jan 12 '12 at 18:59
  • I see now that $.live was replace by $.on. +1 for pointing that out. (Although we are still using jquery 1.4.3 so it didn't seem to behave correctly when I tried it.) – Jason Gerstorff Jan 12 '12 at 19:04
  • I would really recommend you to use another selector to bind all your forms instead of using $.live. $.live is working but you might get unexpected behavior. You could give all your forms a class and then use $("form.class-name") and attach a callback to the submit function. – jcruz Jan 12 '12 at 19:35
  • $.live definitely went haywire on me today. Thanks again for the tip. – Jason Gerstorff Jan 13 '12 at 21:19

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