1

I have this functor:

struct functor
{
  template<class T> void operator()(T value)           // (*)
  {
    // process the value
  }
  template<> void operator()<const wchar_t *>(const wchar_t *value) // (**)
  {
    if (value)
    {
      // process the value
    }
  }
  template<> void operator()<const char *>(const char *value) // (**)
  {
    if (value)
    {
      // process the value
    }
  }
  template<> void operator()<wchar_t *>(wchar_t *value) // (**)
  {
    if (value)
    {
      // process the value
    }
  }
  template<> void operator()<char *>(char *value) // (**)
  {
    if (value)
    {
      // process the value
    }
  }
};

As you can see, I have 4 identical template specializations. Is there a technique to specify all of them once, meaning somehow to partition all the possible types into the main group (*) and the specialized one (**)?

Thanks.

EDIT

Oops, fixed some typos.

6
  • Those are not valid specializations. What is T?
    – Kerrek SB
    Jan 12 '12 at 21:41
  • maybe you should tell us what you are really trying to do instead of how you are currently trying to solve your problem
    – Grizzly
    Jan 12 '12 at 21:42
  • Something like typename std::enable_if<MyCheck<T>::value>::type operator()(T);, I suppose.
    – Kerrek SB
    Jan 12 '12 at 21:42
  • @KerrekSB - could you reply with a full code snippet?
    – mark
    Jan 12 '12 at 21:46
  • Why do you need a const and a non-const version if they are "identical"?
    – Bo Persson
    Jan 12 '12 at 21:54
3

You can get away with a simpler scheme - overloading!

template<class T>
void foo(T value){ // general
  // ...
}

template<class T>
void foo(T* value){ // for pointers!
  if(value)
    foo(*value); // forward to general implementation
}

Also, I'd recommend to make the parameter a reference - const if you don't need to modify it (or maybe both, depending on what you actually need to do):

template<class T>
void foo(T& value){ // general, may modify parameter
  // ...
}

template<class T>
void foo(T const& value){ // general, will not modify parameter
  // ...
}

If you want to have a special implementation for a certain set of types (i.e., one implementation for the whole set), traits and tag dispatching can help you:

// dispatch tags
struct non_ABC_tag{};
struct ABC_tag{};

class A; class B; class C;

template<class T>
struct get_tag{
  typedef non_ABC_tag type;
};

// specialization on the members of the set
template<> struct get_tag<A>{ typedef ABC_tag type; };
template<> struct get_tag<B>{ typedef ABC_tag type; };
template<> struct get_tag<C>{ typedef ABC_tag type; };

// again, consider references for 'value' - see above
template<class T>
void foo(T value, non_ABC_tag){
  // not A, B or C ...
}

template<class T>
void foo(T value, ABC_tag){
  // A, B, or C ...
}

template<class T>
void foo(T value){
  foo(value, typename get_tag<T>::type()); // dispatch
}

Bottom line is, you'll need atleast some amount of duplication (tags, overloads, ...) if you want to group types that have nothing in common.

4
  • How does that help? You still have to implement the same function four times. Jan 12 '12 at 21:46
  • This is good if I divide my types into pointers and non pointers. But what if this is not the case? Is there an explicit way to tell that a template is specialized for types A, B and C, where the template implementation is identical for all of them? Overloading forces me to duplicate the implementation for A, B and C.
    – mark
    Jan 12 '12 at 21:59
  • @mark: You can use traits and tag dispatching (gonna edit that in), or just overload for A, B and C and forward to a general implementation (like done here for pointers).
    – Xeo
    Jan 12 '12 at 22:02
  • I wish it could be expressed a bit less verbosely.
    – mark
    Jan 12 '12 at 22:36
1

You mean like this?

struct functor
{
    template<class T> void operator()(T value)
    {
        // process the value
    }
    template<class T> void operator()(T* value) // overload, not specialization
    {
        if (value) {
            // process the value
        }
    }
};

http://ideone.com/P8GLp

If you want only those types, something else

struct functor
{
protected:
    template<class T> void special(T* value) // overload, not specialization
    {
        if (value) {
            // process the value
        }
    }    
public
    template<class T> void operator()(T value)
    {
        // process the value
    }
    void operator()(char* value) {special(value);}
    void operator()(wchar_t* value) {special(value);}
    void operator()(const char* value) {special(value);}
    void operator()(const wchar_t* value) {special(value);}
};
8
  • 1
    Function templates may not be specialized partially.
    – Kerrek SB
    Jan 12 '12 at 21:46
  • I suppose you mean template<> in the second template, right?
    – mark
    Jan 12 '12 at 21:46
  • @Xeo - There used to be <T*> after operator(), now it is indeed an overload.
    – mark
    Jan 12 '12 at 21:54
  • @KerrekSB: I was debugging as you typed that, fixed it with specialization instead Jan 12 '12 at 21:54
  • This is good if I divide my types into pointers and non pointers. But what if this is not the case? Is there an explicit way to tell that a template is specialized for types A, B and C, where the template implementation is identical for all of them? Overloading forces me to duplicate the implementation for A, B and C.
    – mark
    Jan 12 '12 at 22:00

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