6

I wonder how to validate the locals passed to render template in controller

Controller:

def lelf_panel
  # ...
  if some_condition
    locals_hash = some_very_long_hash_A
  else
    locals_hash = some_very_long_hash_B
  end
  render :partial => "left_panel", :layout => false, :locals => locals_hash
end

Current Spec:

it 'should render correct template for lelf_panel' do
  # ... 
  get 'left_panel'
  response.should render_template('system/_left_panel')
end   

Now I need to finish Rcov for this controller so I need to add/modify spec to cover both 'some_condition' results. and I want to validate 'lelf_panel' locals passed to render, as if I only validate the render_template, partial page rendered for both result are the same.

I check the 'render_template' in rspec docs in http://rubydoc.info/gems/rspec-rails/2.8.1/RSpec/Rails/Matchers/RenderTemplate:render_template

it only provide and 2nd params for message, so how can I test the locals passed to render?

1
0

as far as I know, there is no way to directly examine the locals for a template in the way you're describing.

You could change locals_hash to @locals_hash and then examine the results through assigns( :locals_hash).

Or, you could use selectors on the resulting HTML and check that some indicative content is there -- for instance, if locals_hash affects the title of the page, check that the resulting HTML page title is what you expect.

| improve this answer | |
18
0

Instead of using the render_template matcher, you can use an expectation on the controller object.

it 'should render correct template for lefl_panel' do
  # ...
  allow(controller).to receive(:render).with no_args
  expect(controller).to receive(:render).with({
    :partial => 'system/_left_panel',
    :layout  => false,
    :locals  => some_very_long_hash_A
  })
  get 'left_panel'
end
| improve this answer | |
  • This worked for me - but only after I put the get command AFTER the should_receive comment, and I also needed to add controller.stub(:render) to avoid an error - but I'm not sure why.... – Phantomwhale Feb 5 '13 at 1:56
  • 1
    This is the superior answer. Changing an application to fit the needs of a testing library is a code smell. – user94154 Jun 24 '14 at 15:50
  • @Phantomwhale I just hit the same error you encountered. The problem is that our expectation does not render or redirect anything, so the default render is called at the end of the action. That used to be fine with rspec, but is an unmet expectation now. – Ryan Ahearn Dec 5 '14 at 19:00
  • @user94154's logic is correct - our expect block removes the original from being called so the default render (with no args) is called, and we need ANOTHER expect/allow statement to catch that. A clean way to address this is to just add .and_call_original to the end of our expect block so it not only expects it, but also goes ahead and calls the original afterwards. Make sure you have render_views enabled at the top as well if you are in a controller test so the views actually get rendered. – user2490003 Sep 28 '15 at 22:15
4
0

Same as @ryan-ahearn 's answer with suggestions from @user2490003 's comment - but all put into something more flexible and for RSpec 3.

  # Safe to set globally, since actions can either render or redirect once or fail anyway
  before do
    allow(controller).to receive(:render).and_call_original
  end

  describe "get left panel" do
    before do
      # other setup
      get 'left_panel'
    end

    it 'should render correct template for lelf_panel' do
      # Sadly, render_template is primitive (no hash_including, no block with args, etc.)
      expect(subject).to render_template('system/_left_panel')
    end

    it 'should render with correct local value' do
      expect(controller).to have_received(:render) do |options|
        expect(options[:locals][:key_from_very_long_hash]).to eq('value_of_key_from_very_long_hash')
      end
    end
  end
| improve this answer | |
  • 1
    I found this one to be the most useful, however, I did have to change the block signature, as at least in my version of rails (3.2, don't ask ;) it passes the name of the method being rendered. E.g in my controller I have render "index", locals: { presenter: presenter } and in my spec I now have expect(controller).to have_received(:render) do |_method, options| .. rest is the same. – patrickdavey May 28 '17 at 22:25

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