I'm new to Javascript and was reading up on it, when I came to a chapter that described function recursion. It used an example function to find the nth number of the Fibonacci sequence. The code is as follows:

function fibonacci(n) {
   if (n < 2){
     return 1;
   }else{
     return fibonacci(n-2) + fibonacci(n-1);
   }
}

console.log(fibonacci(7));
//Returns 21

I'm having trouble grasping exactly what this function is doing. Can someone explain what's going on here? I'm getting stuck on the 5th line, where the function calls itself. What's happening here?

  • 1
    I have made the question more generic (removed the "javascript" attribution in title and tag). – user166390 Jan 13 '12 at 2:53
  • 3
    By the way, that code doesn't look right. It should be if (n < 2) return n;. fibonacci(0) should return 0, not 1 and fibonacci(7) should be 13, not 21. – Nelson Rothermel Jun 28 '12 at 19:40
  • 1
    No, the fibonacci sequence starts with 1, not 0. – Thom Smith Jul 27 '12 at 20:16
  • @ThomSmith - Well, actually, it CAN start with 0. 0,1,1,2,3,5,8... We can even have the sequence go backwards. – user85109 Apr 19 '13 at 14:31
  • @woodchips I think the fibbonacci sequence actually should start with 0. – AJMansfield May 29 '13 at 20:14
up vote 81 down vote accepted

You're defining a function in terms of itself. In general, fibonnaci(n) = fibonnaci(n - 2) + fibonnaci(n - 1). We're just representing this relationship in code. So, for fibonnaci(7) we can observe:

  • fibonacci(7) is equal to fibonacci(6) + fibonacci(5)
  • fibonacci(6) is equal to fibonacci(5) + fibonacci(4)
  • fibonacci(5) is equal to fibonacci(4) + fibonacci(3)
  • fibonacci(4) is equal to fibonacci(3) + fibonacci(2)
  • fibonacci(3) is equal to fibonacci(2) + fibonacci(1)
  • fibonacci(2) is equal to fibonacci(1) + fibonacci(0)
  • fibonacci(1) is equal to 1
  • fibonacci(0) is equal to 1

We now have all the parts needed to evaluate fibonacci(7), which was our original goal. Notice that the base case -- return 1 when n < 2 -- is what makes this possible. This is what stops the recursion, so that we can can start the process of unrolling the stack and summing the values we're returning at each step. Without this step, we'd continue calling fibonacci on smaller and smaller values right up until the program finally crashed.

It might help to add some logging statements that illustrate this:

function fibonacci(n, c) {
    var indent = "";
    for (var i = 0; i < c; i++) {
        indent += " ";
    }
    console.log(indent + "fibonacci(" + n + ")");
    if (n < 2) {
        return 1;
    } else {
        return fibonacci(n - 2, c + 4) + fibonacci(n - 1, c + 4);
    }
}

console.log(fibonacci(7, 0));

Output:

fibonacci(7)
    fibonacci(5)
        fibonacci(3)
            fibonacci(1)
            fibonacci(2)
                fibonacci(0)
                fibonacci(1)
        fibonacci(4)
            fibonacci(2)
                fibonacci(0)
                fibonacci(1)
            fibonacci(3)
                fibonacci(1)
                fibonacci(2)
                    fibonacci(0)
                    fibonacci(1)
    fibonacci(6)
        fibonacci(4)
            fibonacci(2)
                fibonacci(0)
                fibonacci(1)
            fibonacci(3)
                fibonacci(1)
                fibonacci(2)
                    fibonacci(0)
                    fibonacci(1)
        fibonacci(5)
            fibonacci(3)
                fibonacci(1)
                fibonacci(2)
                    fibonacci(0)
                    fibonacci(1)
            fibonacci(4)
                fibonacci(2)
                    fibonacci(0)
                    fibonacci(1)
                fibonacci(3)
                    fibonacci(1)
                    fibonacci(2)
                        fibonacci(0)
                        fibonacci(1)

Values at the same level of indentation are summed to produce the result for the previous level of indentation.

  • 2
    This nailed it for me. The flow that you created is just what I needed to make sense of it. Brilliant work. – opes Jan 13 '12 at 2:51
  • 1
    Yeah, using console.log is a lot faster than trying to make a chart by hand like I did! – Jesse Good Jan 13 '12 at 2:54
  • If you are looking for a functional way to cache the results to optimise the function calls const fibonacci = (n, cache = {1: 1, 2: 1}) => cache[n] || (cache[n--] = fibonacci(n--, cache) + fibonacci(n, cache)); – Juan S. Gaitán V. Apr 17 '17 at 21:38

There are many good answers here, but I made this diagram which helps better explain the outcome of the function. The only values that will ever be returned are 1 or 0 (your example returns 1 for n < 2, but should instead return n).

This means that each recursive call will eventually wind up returning either a 0 or 1. Those end up being "cached" in the stack and "carried up" into the original invocation and added together.

So if you were to draw this same diagram out for each value of 'n' you could manually find the answer.

This diagram roughly illustrates how every function is returned for fib(5).

![Fibonacci Javascript Tree Diagram

This shows the control flow, i.e. the order of execution for the functions. Remember code is always executed left->right and top-> bottom. So whenever a new function is called it is paused and then the next invocation occurs.

The following illustrates the actual control flow based on your original post. Please note the base condition is if (n <= 0) {return 0} else if (n <= 2) {return 1;} for simplification:

1. fib(5) {
    return fib(4) + fib(3);
2.   fib(4) {
      return fib(3) + fib(2);
3.     fib(3) {
        return fib(2) + fib(1);
4.       fib(2) {
A=        return 1;
         };
5.       fib(1) {
B=        return 1;
         };
C=      return 2; // (1 + 1)
       };
6.     fib(2) {
D=      return 1;
       };
E=    return 3; // (2 + 1)
     };
7.   fib(3) {
      return fib(2) + fib(1);
8.     fib(2) {
F=      return 1;
       };
9.     fib(1) {
G=      return 1;
       };
H=    return 2; // (1 + 1)
     };
I=  return 5; // (3 + 2)
   };
  • Great visualization! Even though I already know how recursive calculation works, I must say that this gives an excellent visual representation of how the actual sum is being calculated. Thumbs up! – Mattias Feb 18 '16 at 5:18

Step 1) When fibonacci(7) is called imagine the following (notice how I changed all the n's to 7):

function fibonacci(7) {
    if (7 < 2){
        return 1;
    }else{
        return fibonacci(7-2) + fibonacci(7-1);
    }
}

Step 2) Since (7 < 2) is obviously false, we go to fibonacci(7-2) + fibonacci(7-1); which translates to fibonacci(5) + fibonacci(6); Since fibonacci(5) comes first, that get called (changes the n's to 5 this time):

function fibonacci(5) {
    if (5 < 2){
        return 1;
    }else{
        return fibonacci(5-2) + fibonacci(5-1);
    }
}

Step 3) And or course fibonacci(6) also gets called, so what happened is for everyone call of fibonacci 2 new fibonacci get called.

Visualization:

      fibonacci(7)
      ____|_____
     |          |
fibonacci(5)  fibonacci(6)
____|____     ____|_____
|        |    |         |
fib(3)  fib(4) fib(4)   fib(5)

See how it branches? When is it going to stop? When n becomes less than 2, thats why you have if (n < 2). At that point the branching stops and everything gets added together.

  • Very nice. These diagrams are really helpful in grasping the concepts. I think that's where I was a bit fuzzy. Thanks for this! – opes Jan 13 '12 at 3:07
  • What I wonder: If n becomes less than 2, shouldn't the condition to return 1 be then fulfilled? Why doesn't it return `2? – Stophface Jan 12 '16 at 14:54
  • @Chrissl: From here: *By definition, the first two numbers in the Fibonacci sequence are either 1 and 1, or 0 and 1,* depending on the chosen starting point of the sequence, and each subsequent number is the sum of the previous two. It returns 1 because that is how the sequence is defined. – Jesse Good Jan 13 '16 at 0:02
  • @JesseGood Yes, I understand that. But you wrote When is it going to stop? When n becomes less than 2, thats why you have if (n < 2). At that point the branching stops and everything gets added together. Why does it add together? The statement says if (n < 2) { return 1; – Stophface Jan 13 '16 at 11:20
  • @Chrissl: fibonacci(7-2) + fibonacci(7-1) Do you see the + sign between the two fibonacci calls? The returned values from fibonacci(7-2) and fibonacci(7-1) are added together. (This is just one example) What is the returned value? Well, that happens at the return statements and when n is less than 2, 1 is returned. – Jesse Good Jan 13 '16 at 11:28

Hopefully the following helps. Calling:

fibonacci(3)

will get to line 5 and do:

return fibonacci(1) + fibonacci(2);

the first expression calls the function again and returns 1 (since n < 2).

The second calls the function again, gets to the 5th line and does:.

return fibonacci(0) + fibonacci(1);

both expressions return 1 (since n < 2 for both), so this call to the function returns 2.

So the answer is 1 + 2, which is 3.

  • 2
    That makes sense. So basically every time the function is called, it will drill down to fibonacci(0) + fibonacci(1), which is 1 + 2 - where the actual math is being done. Thanks! – opes Jan 13 '12 at 2:53

I think that these two functions gave a much clearer explanation of recursion to me (from this blog post):

function fibDriver(n) {
  return n === 0 ? 0 : fib(0, 1, n);
}

function fib(a, b, n) {
  return n === 1 ? b : fib(b, a + b, n-1);
}
  • The accepted answer may be a good example of recursion and the stack but this answer is much more efficient in practice. – Mikeumus May 15 '16 at 20:53

To calculate nth fibonacci number, the relation is F(n) = F(n-2) + F(n-1).

If we implement the relation in the code, for nth number, we calculate the (n-2)th and (n-1)th number using the same method.

Each subsequent number is the sum of the previous two numbers. Thus, the seventh number is the sum of the sixth and fifth numbers. More generally, the nth number is the sum of n - 2 and n - 1, as long as n > 2. As recursive functions need a stop condition to stop recursing, here n<2 is the condition.

f(7) = F(6) + F(5);

in turn, F(6) = F(5) + F(4)

F(5) = F(4) + F(3)... it goes on until n<2

F(1) returns 1

The function is calling itself. That's simply the definition of a recursive function. In the 5th line it is transferring execution to itself by passing parameters that will result in a value.

To ensure that a recursive function doesn't turn into an endless loop, there must be some sort of condition that doesn't call itself. The goal of your code in the question is to perform the calculations of a fibonacci sequence.

  • I understand that part, but what I'm not grasping is how it's getting the result (in this case, 21). Where is the math involved that calculates that? Am I understanding that by invoking fibonacci(7) that I am effectively calling the function (on line 5) fibonacci(5) + fibonacci(6)? What are those function calls returning to get the result of 21? – opes Jan 13 '12 at 2:38
  • @Dan just follow the flow of the code. Work through it on paper (luckily, these is a very easy function to write out with a pencil and paper). Debug it. Step through it. You just need to understand the flow of the code. It looks odd at first, but you'll get it. Just step through it. – user596075 Jan 13 '12 at 2:40
 
   /*
* Steps Fibonacci recursion
* 1) 3 gets passed. (3 is printed to the screen during this call)
* 2) Fibonacci A gets decrements by 2 and recursion happens passing 1 as a param. (1 is printed to the screen during this call)
* 3) Fibonacci A hits the base case returning 1 and it "unwinds". (No recursion here)
* 4) Fibonacci B gets called, decrementing the previous value of n (3 was the previous value of n before A made the returning call) to 2. (2 is printed to the screen during this call)
* 5) Fibonacci A is called again subtracting 2 from n (2-2=0) and passes 0 as a param. (1 is printed to the screen during this call since it's converted from 0)
* 6) Fibonacci A hits the base case and "unwinds" (no recursion here)
* 7) Fibonacci B is called subtracting 1 from 2 (2 was the previous value of n before A made the returning call) and passes 1 as a param. (1 is printed to the screen during this call)
* 7) Fibonacci B now hits the base case, returning 1 and "unwinds" (no recursion here)
* 8) Fibonacci B retraces it's steps back through All previous fucntion calls and values of n (n=2 in our case) and adds [them] to the copy of n=1 stored in its local scope
* 9) Once Fibonacci B completes the "unwinding" process, it returns the calculated value to the original caller (no recursion here)

 Note* 
    Each instance of Fibonacci recursion creates its own scope and stores the returned value in a copy of n (in our case 1). 
    As it the function "unwinds" it executes subsequent code that receive the value of n at that time. (all functions that call other functions "unwind" back through previous calls once they return)

    In the last call of our Fibonacci example, Fibonacci B receives the value of n=2 as Fibonaccci A "unwinds" since that was the last value before it made the returning call.
    Once Fibonacci B reached the base case and "unwound", it retraced its steps back through all previous values of n (in our case just n=2) and added [them] to its local copy of n=1.

* The result when passing the number 3 is: 
                3
                 1
                 2
                  1
                  1
            (3)
*/
var div = document.getElementById('fib');

function fib( n, c ) {
  var indent = "";
  for (var i = 0; i < c; i++) {
    indent += " ";
}
  var v = n===0 ? 1 : n
  var el = document.createElement('div'),
  text = indent + "fibonacci(" + v + ")";
  el.innerHTML = text;
  div.appendChild(el);
  if(n<2){
     return 1;
  } 
  return fib(n-2, c + 4)  + fib(n-1, c + 4);

}

Fibonacci algorithm with recursive function based on ES6

const fibonacci = ( n, k = 1, fib2 = 0, fib1 = 1 ) => {
  return k === n ? 
    (() => { return fib1; })() 
    : 
    (() => {
      k++;
      return fibonacci(n, k, fib1, fib1 + fib2);
    })();  
}
console.info(' fibonacci ' + 11 + ' = ' + fibonacci(11));

Your Answer

 

By clicking "Post Your Answer", you acknowledge that you have read our updated terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy, and that your continued use of the website is subject to these policies.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.