11

I have a date/time string like 2012-01-13 04:37:20 but I want to convert it to dd-mm-yyyy hh:mm, how can i do this?

I am using the following code but it throws an exception.

var now = "2012-01-13 04:37:20";
var dd = now.toLocaleDateString() + " " + now.toLocaleTimeString();
alert(dd);

12 Answers 12

10

You can do a simple string manipulation and create js date object. See function below, which accepts date in format //yyyy-mm-dd hh:mm:ss

DEMO here

function toJSDate (dateTime) {

var dateTime = dateTime.split(" ");//dateTime[0] = date, dateTime[1] = time

var date = dateTime[0].split("-");
var time = dateTime[1].split(":");

//(year, month, day, hours, minutes, seconds, milliseconds)
return new Date(date[0], date[1], date[2], time[0], time[1], time[2], 0);

}
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  • 8
    date[1] should be date[1] - 1 for correct output of month. – Dzhuang Jul 19 '15 at 17:05
7

The best date-time handling lib in JavaSCript is moment.

moment().format('MMMM Do YYYY, h:mm:ss a');
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6

If you don't need all the features that a library like Moment.js provides, then you can use my port of strftime. It's lightweight (1.35 KB vs. 57.9 KB minified compared to Moment.js 2.15.0) and provides most of the functionality of strftime().

/* Port of strftime(). Compatibility notes:
 *
 * %c - formatted string is slightly different
 * %D - not implemented (use "%m/%d/%y" or "%d/%m/%y")
 * %e - space is not added
 * %E - not implemented
 * %h - not implemented (use "%b")
 * %k - space is not added
 * %n - not implemented (use "\n")
 * %O - not implemented
 * %r - not implemented (use "%I:%M:%S %p")
 * %R - not implemented (use "%H:%M")
 * %t - not implemented (use "\t")
 * %T - not implemented (use "%H:%M:%S")
 * %U - not implemented
 * %W - not implemented
 * %+ - not implemented
 * %% - not implemented (use "%")
 *
 * strftime() reference:
 * http://man7.org/linux/man-pages/man3/strftime.3.html
 *
 * Day of year (%j) code based on Joe Orost's answer:
 * http://stackoverflow.com/questions/8619879/javascript-calculate-the-day-of-the-year-1-366
 *
 * Week number (%V) code based on Taco van den Broek's prototype:
 * http://techblog.procurios.nl/k/news/view/33796/14863/calculate-iso-8601-week-and-year-in-javascript.html
 */
function strftime(sFormat, date) {
  if (!(date instanceof Date)) date = new Date();
  var nDay = date.getDay(),
    nDate = date.getDate(),
    nMonth = date.getMonth(),
    nYear = date.getFullYear(),
    nHour = date.getHours(),
    aDays = ['Sunday', 'Monday', 'Tuesday', 'Wednesday', 'Thursday', 'Friday', 'Saturday'],
    aMonths = ['January', 'February', 'March', 'April', 'May', 'June', 'July', 'August', 'September', 'October', 'November', 'December'],
    aDayCount = [0, 31, 59, 90, 120, 151, 181, 212, 243, 273, 304, 334],
    isLeapYear = function() {
      return (nYear%4===0 && nYear%100!==0) || nYear%400===0;
    },
    getThursday = function() {
      var target = new Date(date);
      target.setDate(nDate - ((nDay+6)%7) + 3);
      return target;
    },
    zeroPad = function(nNum, nPad) {
      return ('' + (Math.pow(10, nPad) + nNum)).slice(1);
    };
  return sFormat.replace(/%[a-z]/gi, function(sMatch) {
    return {
      '%a': aDays[nDay].slice(0,3),
      '%A': aDays[nDay],
      '%b': aMonths[nMonth].slice(0,3),
      '%B': aMonths[nMonth],
      '%c': date.toUTCString(),
      '%C': Math.floor(nYear/100),
      '%d': zeroPad(nDate, 2),
      '%e': nDate,
      '%F': date.toISOString().slice(0,10),
      '%G': getThursday().getFullYear(),
      '%g': ('' + getThursday().getFullYear()).slice(2),
      '%H': zeroPad(nHour, 2),
      '%I': zeroPad((nHour+11)%12 + 1, 2),
      '%j': zeroPad(aDayCount[nMonth] + nDate + ((nMonth>1 && isLeapYear()) ? 1 : 0), 3),
      '%k': '' + nHour,
      '%l': (nHour+11)%12 + 1,
      '%m': zeroPad(nMonth + 1, 2),
      '%M': zeroPad(date.getMinutes(), 2),
      '%p': (nHour<12) ? 'AM' : 'PM',
      '%P': (nHour<12) ? 'am' : 'pm',
      '%s': Math.round(date.getTime()/1000),
      '%S': zeroPad(date.getSeconds(), 2),
      '%u': nDay || 7,
      '%V': (function() {
              var target = getThursday(),
                n1stThu = target.valueOf();
              target.setMonth(0, 1);
              var nJan1 = target.getDay();
              if (nJan1!==4) target.setMonth(0, 1 + ((4-nJan1)+7)%7);
              return zeroPad(1 + Math.ceil((n1stThu-target)/604800000), 2);
            })(),
      '%w': '' + nDay,
      '%x': date.toLocaleDateString(),
      '%X': date.toLocaleTimeString(),
      '%y': ('' + nYear).slice(2),
      '%Y': nYear,
      '%z': date.toTimeString().replace(/.+GMT([+-]\d+).+/, '$1'),
      '%Z': date.toTimeString().replace(/.+\((.+?)\)$/, '$1')
    }[sMatch] || sMatch;
  });
}

Sample usage:

// Returns "15-09-2016 16:20"
strftime('%d-%m-%Y %H:%M');

// You can optionally pass it a Date object
// Returns "01-01-2016 21:30"
strftime('%d-%m-%Y %H:%M', new Date('Jan 1, 2016 9:30 PM'));

The latest code is available here: https://github.com/thdoan/strftime

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5

Use either simple string manipulation (as suggested by @SKS) or use a library. The latter is more flexible and lets you change the input or output format easily. For example, using the Globalize.js library, you would write:

var dd = Globalize.parseDate(now, "yyyy-MM-dd HH:mm:ss");
dd = Globalize.format(dd, "dd-MM-yyyy HH:mm");

Note however that formats such as "dd-mm-yyyy hh:mm" are confusing – it is neither a standard ISO format nor any localized (language-dependent) format. The Globalize.js library lets you use predefined language-dependent formats in addition to explicitly specified formats.

Note that the built-in date and time parsing and formatting routines in JavaScript are implementation-dependent. Using them means non-portable code. For example, there is no guarantee that new Date() will accept the format you have as input, and toLocaleDateString() writes the date in some locale-dependent format, which can be just about anything.

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2

I think it is best to use the Intl.DateTimeFormat class.

The usage is fairly straightforward. You can not enter a pattern as you want to, but it will give you the results you want.

Here is an example on how to use it:

public formatDate(date : Date) : string{
    var options = {  year: 'numeric', month: 'short', day: 'numeric' };
    return new Intl.DateTimeFormat('de-DE', options).format(date);
}

If you really want to enter a DateTimeFormat string, it would be easy enough to write a function which parses the string using Regex, but I don't think it is needed.

For further Information go here:

https://developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/Web/JavaScript/Reference/Global_Objects/DateTimeFormat

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  • Good to know that this exists, but this is not available on all platforms as described in the mozilla reference – Peter T. Sep 6 '17 at 13:55
1

a small function , as follow:

var formatTime = function(time, format){
time = typeof time == 'number' ? new Date(time) : time;
format = format || 'yyyy-mm-dd hh:MM:ss';
var year = time.getFullYear();
var month = time.getMonth() + 1;
var date = time.getDate();
var hours = time.getHours();
var minutes = time.getMinutes();
var seconds = time.getSeconds();
var add0 = function(t){return t < 10 ? '0' + t : t}
var replaceMent = {
    'yyyy': year,
    'mm': add0(month),
    'm': month,
    'dd': add0(date),
    'd': date,
    'hh': add0(hours),
    'h': hours,
    'MM': add0(minutes),
    'M': minutes,
    'ss': add0(seconds),
    's': seconds
}
for( var k in replaceMent ){
    format = format.replace(k, replaceMent[k]);
}
return format;

}

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1

For working with DateTimes in javascript it's better to use the 'Intl.DateTimeFormat' as follow:

var date = new Date('2012-01-13 14:37:20');
var options = { year: 'numeric', month: '2-digit', day: '2-digit',
hour:'2-digit', minute: '2-digit',hour12: false};
console.log(new Intl.DateTimeFormat('en-US', options).format(date).replace(/\//g,'-').replace(',',''));

Result: "01-13-2012 14:37"

The date and time formats can be customized with options argument.

Check Online

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1

Love one liners - local date SPACE time DOT milliseconds / IIFE:

// simpler, but milliseconds not padded
console.log(
(function(d){return d.toLocaleDateString() + ' ' + d.toLocaleTimeString() + '.' + d.getMilliseconds()})(new Date())
)

// including millis padding
console.log(
(function(d){return d.toLocaleDateString() + ' ' + d.toLocaleTimeString() + '.' + (d.getMilliseconds()+1000+'').substr(1)})(new Date())
)

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0

Date requires Date object so you should give var d = new Date() something like this then for formatting see http://code.google.com/p/datejs/ link it will be helpful.

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0

Easily accomplished by my date-shortcode package:

const dateShortcode = require('date-shortcode')
dateShortcode.parse('{DD-MM-YYYY hh:mm}', '2012-01-13 04:37:20')
//=> '13-01-2012 04:37'
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0

With Jquery, you steal datepicker's feature like that:

$.datepicker.formatDate( "dd-M-yy", new Date())

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  • Nice idea when you don't want to add moment.js, but you already have datepicker at your disposal! – lukas84 Jun 24 '19 at 15:41
-1

Your variable now is a String object and toLocaleDateString method needs a Date object. See w3schools

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