35

I'm Java person who just started learning Python. Take this example:

class Person():
    def __init__(self, name, phone):
        self.name = name
        self.phone = phone

class Teenager(Person):
    def __init__(self, name, phone, website):
        self.name=name
        self.phone=phone
        self.website=website

I'm sure there's a lot of redundant code (I know in Java, there are a lot of redundancies for the bit of code above).

Which parts are redundant with respect to which attributes are already inherited from the parent class?

42

When writing the __init__ function for a class in python, you should always call the __init__ function of its superclass. We can use this to pass the relevant attributes directly to the superclass, so your code would look like this:

class Person(object):
    def __init__(self, name, phone):
        self.name = name
        self.phone = phone
class Teenager(Person):
    def __init__(self, name, phone, website):
        Person.__init__(self, name, phone)
        self.website=website

As others have pointed out, you could replace the line

Person.__init__(self, name, phone)

with

super(Teenager, self).__init__(name, phone)

and the code will do the same thing. This is because in python instance.method(args) is just shorthand for Class.method(instance, args). If you want use super you need to make sure that you specify object as the base class for Person as I have done in my code.

The python documentation has more information about how to use the super keyword. The important thing in this case is that it tells python to look for the method __init__ in a superclass of self that is not Teenager

  • 3
    Note that if you are using Python 2.x, you must explicitly list object as a base class of Person in order to use super(). Otherwise, you have to use the Person.__init__ form. – chepner Jan 13 '12 at 17:17
  • @chepner can you provide a reference for that? I can't find one. – murgatroid99 Jan 13 '12 at 17:19
  • docs.python.org/library/functions.html#super indicates that super() is only supported on new-style classes, which in Python 2.x are those that inherit from object – chepner Jan 13 '12 at 17:21
  • @chepner Thanks. I did not realize python classes do not automatically inherit from a common base class the way they do in Java. I have fixed my code. – murgatroid99 Jan 13 '12 at 17:30
13

Slightly cleaner way I like to do this:

class Teenager(Person):
        def __init__(self, *args, **kwargs):
           self.website=kwargs.pop('website')
           super(Teenager, self).__init__(*args, **kwargs)

It doesn't make much of a difference in this case, but when you have an __init__ with a ton of arguments, it makes life easier.

  • Upvoted for use of *args and **kwargs (... efficient in the case of a numerous arguments). – NYCeyes Nov 23 '15 at 17:53
  • Using args and kwargs generally leads to inconsistent behaviour. Explicitly taking a keyword from kwargs means Teenager('a', 'b', 'c') will not work correctly. It fails with a KeyError, as website is args[2] in this case. – MisterMiyagi Mar 25 '18 at 20:45
6

Attributes in Python are not inherited when they are defined in the constructor and parent class constructor is not called, unless you do all of it manually:

class Person():
    def __init__(self, name, phone):
        self.name = name
        self.phone = phone
class Teenager(Person):
    def_init_(self, name, phone, website):
        Person.__init__(self, name, phone)  # Call parent class constructor.
        self.website=website

More on it here: http://docs.python.org/tutorial/classes.html#inheritance

3

All of the examples so far have been for Python 2.x but here's a solution for Python 3.x that makes use of a shorter version of super() and doesn't inherit from object.

class Person:
    def __init__(self, name, phone):
        self.name = name
        self.phone = phone

class Teenager(Person):
    def __init__(self, name, phone, website):
        super().__init__(name, phone)
        self.website = website
1

__init__, unlike a java constructor, is not automatically called for every class in the inheritance hierarchy - you need to do it yourself.

In addition, all of your object hierarchies should be rooted at object (except in special cases).

Your code should read:

class Person(object):
    def __init__(self, name, phone):
        self.name = name
        self.phone = phone
class Teenager(Person):
    def_init_(self, name, phone, website):
        super(Teenager, self).__init__(name, phone)
        self.website=website

super creates a delegate for its second argument (self), which will call the next function in the list of functions to call for each name (the "method resolution order"). This is not quite the same as calling the superclass method, as happens in Java.

You could also write super(type(self), self).__init__(name, phone), but if you inherit further from this class, type(self) may not be Teenager, and you could have an infinite recursion. This is one practical consequence of the fact that you are working with a delegate object with a difference MRO, rather than directly calling a superclass constructor.

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