308

In this question Erik needs to generate a secure random token in Node.js. There's the method crypto.randomBytes that generates a random Buffer. However, the base64 encoding in node is not url-safe, it includes / and + instead of - and _. Therefore, the easiest way to generate such token I've found is

require('crypto').randomBytes(48, function(ex, buf) {
    token = buf.toString('base64').replace(/\//g,'_').replace(/\+/g,'-');
});

Is there a more elegant way?

8
  • What is the rest of the code? – Lion789 Aug 3 '13 at 5:01
  • 4
    There's nothing more needed. What rest would you like to see? – Hubert OG Aug 12 '13 at 13:46
  • Nevermind, I got it to work, was just unsure of how you threw it in, but got a better grasp of the concept – Lion789 Aug 12 '13 at 19:22
  • 1
    Shameless self-plug, I created yet another npm package: tokgen. You can specify allowed characters using a range syntax similar to character classes in regular expressions ('a-zA-Z0-9_-'). – Max Truxa Aug 9 '16 at 19:18
  • 1
    This may be convenient for anyone who'd like a specific string length. The 3/4th's is to handle the base conversion. /*returns a base64 encoded string of length*/ function randomString(length){ return crypto.randomBytes(length*3/4).toString('base64'); } Works nice for those databases with those character limits. – TheUnknownGeek Oct 19 '17 at 21:51

12 Answers 12

397

Try crypto.randomBytes():

require('crypto').randomBytes(48, function(err, buffer) {
  var token = buffer.toString('hex');
});

The 'hex' encoding works in node v0.6.x or newer.

13
  • 3
    That seems better, thanks! A 'base64-url' encoding would be nice, though. – Hubert OG Jan 13 '12 at 19:40
  • 2
    Thanks for the tip, but I think the OP simply wanted the already-standard RFC 3548 section 4 "Base 64 Encoding with URL and Filename Safe Alphabet". IMO, replacing the characters is "elegant enough". – natevw Oct 7 '13 at 21:58
  • 10
    If you're looking for the above as a bash one-liner, you can do node -e "require('crypto').randomBytes(48, function(ex, buf) { console.log(buf.toString('hex')) });" – Dmitry Minkovsky Feb 25 '14 at 18:00
  • 25
    And you can always do buf.toString('base64') to get a Base64-encoded number. – Dmitry Minkovsky Feb 25 '14 at 18:11
  • 3
    A slightly more compact version of Dmitry's excellent one-liner: node -p "require('crypto').randomBytes(48).toString('hex');" (subbing base64 for hex) if desired – eddies Aug 6 '18 at 7:56
266

Synchronous option in-case if you are not a JS expert like me. Had to spend some time on how to access the inline function variable

var token = crypto.randomBytes(64).toString('hex');
6
  • 10
    Also in case you don't want to have everything nested. Thanks! – Michael Ozeryansky Oct 7 '16 at 16:50
  • 4
    While this definitely works, do note that in most cases you'll want the async option demonstrated in thejh's answer. – Triforcey Jun 10 '18 at 21:18
  • 1
    const generateToken = (): Promise<string> => new Promise(resolve => randomBytes(48, (err, buffer) => resolve(buffer.toString('hex')))); – yantrab May 1 '19 at 4:21
  • 2
    @Triforcey can you explain why you usually would want the async option? – thomas Jul 16 '19 at 5:17
  • 2
    @thomas Random data can take a while to calculate depending on hardware. In some cases if the computer runs out of random data it'll just return something in it's place. However in other cases it's possible the computer will delay the return of random data (which is actually what you would want) resulting in a slow call. – Triforcey Jul 17 '19 at 15:38
94
  1. Using nanoid third party library [NEW!]

A tiny, secure, URL-friendly, unique string ID generator for JavaScript

https://github.com/ai/nanoid

import { nanoid } from "nanoid";
const id = nanoid(48);

  1. Base 64 Encoding with URL and Filename Safe Alphabet

Page 7 of RCF 4648 describes how to encode in base 64 with URL safety. You can use an existing library like base64url to do the job.

The function will be:

var crypto = require('crypto');
var base64url = require('base64url');

/** Sync */
function randomStringAsBase64Url(size) {
  return base64url(crypto.randomBytes(size));
}

Usage example:

randomStringAsBase64Url(20);
// Returns 'AXSGpLVjne_f7w5Xg-fWdoBwbfs' which is 27 characters length.

Note that the returned string length will not match with the size argument (size != final length).


  1. Crypto random values from limited set of characters

Beware that with this solution the generated random string is not uniformly distributed.

You can also build a strong random string from a limited set of characters like that:

var crypto = require('crypto');

/** Sync */
function randomString(length, chars) {
  if (!chars) {
    throw new Error('Argument \'chars\' is undefined');
  }

  const charsLength = chars.length;
  if (charsLength > 256) {
    throw new Error('Argument \'chars\' should not have more than 256 characters'
      + ', otherwise unpredictability will be broken');
  }

  const randomBytes = crypto.randomBytes(length);
  let result = new Array(length);

  let cursor = 0;
  for (let i = 0; i < length; i++) {
    cursor += randomBytes[i];
    result[i] = chars[cursor % charsLength];
  }

  return result.join('');
}

/** Sync */
function randomAsciiString(length) {
  return randomString(length,
    'abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyzABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ0123456789');
}

Usage example:

randomAsciiString(20);
// Returns 'rmRptK5niTSey7NlDk5y' which is 20 characters length.

randomString(20, 'ABCDEFG');
// Returns 'CCBAAGDGBBEGBDBECDCE' which is 20 characters length.
5
  • 2
    @Lexynux Solution 1 (Base 64 Encoding with URL and Filename Safe Alphabet) because it is the strongest solution in term of security. This solution only encode the key and does not interfere with the key production process. – Yves M. Dec 28 '15 at 13:28
  • Thanks for your support. Do you have any working example to share with the community? It will be welcomed? – alexventuraio Dec 29 '15 at 20:22
  • 9
    Beware that the generated random string is not uniformly distributed. An easy example to show this is, that for a character set of length 255, and a string length of 1, the chance of the first character appearing is twice as high. – Florian Wendelborn Jul 25 '16 at 4:09
  • @Dodekeract Yes, you are talking about solution 2.. That's why solution 1 is way more strong – Yves M. Jul 25 '16 at 8:41
  • I've added nanoid third party library in my response github.com/ai/nanoid – Yves M. May 9 '18 at 15:10
20

The up-to-date right way to do this asynchronously using ES 2016 standards of async and await (as of Node 7) would be the following:

const crypto = require('crypto');

function generateToken({ stringBase = 'base64', byteLength = 48 } = {}) {
  return new Promise((resolve, reject) => {
    crypto.randomBytes(byteLength, (err, buffer) => {
      if (err) {
        reject(err);
      } else {
        resolve(buffer.toString(stringBase));
      }
    });
  });
}

async function handler(req, res) {
   // default token length
   const newToken = await generateToken();
   console.log('newToken', newToken);

   // pass in parameters - adjust byte length
   const shortToken = await generateToken({byteLength: 20});
   console.log('newToken', shortToken);
}

This works out of the box in Node 7 without any Babel transformations

1
11

Random URL and filename string safe (1 liner)

Crypto.randomBytes(48).toString('base64').replace(/\+/g, '-').replace(/\//g, '_').replace(/\=/g, '');
1
  • A wonderful answer in it's simplicity! Just be aware that it could stall the event loop in an indeterministic way (only relevant if it's used often, in a somewhat loaded, time-sensitive system). Otherwise, do the same thing, but using the async version of randomBytes. See nodejs.org/api/… – Alec Thilenius Sep 28 '16 at 19:50
8

Check out:

var crypto = require('crypto');
crypto.randomBytes(Math.ceil(length/2)).toString('hex').slice(0,length);
2
  • Nice! Absolutely underrated solution. Would be great if you rename "length" to "desiredLength" and initiate it with a value before using it :) – Florian Blum Jul 25 '17 at 21:07
  • For anyone wondering, the ceil and slice calls are necessary for desired lengths that are odd. For even lengths, they don't change anything. – Seth Sep 12 '18 at 20:42
7

With async/await and promisification.

const crypto = require('crypto')
const randomBytes = Util.promisify(crypto.randomBytes)
const plain = (await randomBytes(24)).toString('base64').replace(/\W/g, '')

Generates something similar to VjocVHdFiz5vGHnlnwqJKN0NdeHcz8eM

4

Look at real_ates ES2016 way, it's more correct.

ECMAScript 2016 (ES7) way

import crypto from 'crypto';

function spawnTokenBuf() {
    return function(callback) {
        crypto.randomBytes(48, callback);
    };
}

async function() {
    console.log((await spawnTokenBuf()).toString('base64'));
};

Generator/Yield Way

var crypto = require('crypto');
var co = require('co');

function spawnTokenBuf() {
    return function(callback) {
        crypto.randomBytes(48, callback);
    };
}

co(function* () {
    console.log((yield spawnTokenBuf()).toString('base64'));
});
5
  • @Jeffpowrs Indeed, Javascript is upgrading :) Lookup Promises and Generators! – basickarl Nov 16 '15 at 21:54
  • try await, another ECMA7 promise handler – Jain Jul 8 '16 at 6:50
  • I think that you should make the ES 2016 the first example on this as it is moving towards the "right way to do it" in most cases – real_ate May 9 '17 at 10:00
  • I added an answer of my own below that was specific to Node (using require instead of import). Was there a particular reason why you're using import? Do you have babel running? – real_ate May 9 '17 at 15:31
  • @real_ate Indeed I was, I've reverted to using CommonJS until import is officially supported. – basickarl May 9 '17 at 21:20
3

https://www.npmjs.com/package/crypto-extra has a method for it :)

var value = crypto.random(/* desired length */)
1
  • great! But isnt it .randomString (length, charset) (see documentation). So you could user for example crypto.randomString(12). – thomas Jan 13 '20 at 18:32
3

The npm module anyid provides flexible API to generate various kinds of string ID / code.

To generate random string in A-Za-z0-9 using 48 random bytes:

const id = anyid().encode('Aa0').bits(48 * 8).random().id();
// G4NtiI9OYbSgVl3EAkkoxHKyxBAWzcTI7aH13yIUNggIaNqPQoSS7SpcalIqX0qGZ

To generate fixed length alphabet only string filled by random bytes:

const id = anyid().encode('Aa').length(20).random().id();
// qgQBBtDwGMuFHXeoVLpt

Internally it uses crypto.randomBytes() to generate random.

2

crypto-random-string is a nice module for this.

const cryptoRandomString = require('crypto-random-string');
 
cryptoRandomString({length: 10});
// => '2cf05d94db'
 
cryptoRandomString({length: 10, type: 'base64'});
// => 'YMiMbaQl6I'
 
cryptoRandomString({length: 10, type: 'url-safe'});
// => 'YN-tqc8pOw'
 
cryptoRandomString({length: 10, type: 'numeric'});
// => '8314659141'
 
cryptoRandomString({length: 6, type: 'distinguishable'});
// => 'CDEHKM'
 
cryptoRandomString({length: 10, type: 'ascii-printable'});
// => '`#Rt8$IK>B'
 
cryptoRandomString({length: 10, type: 'alphanumeric'});
// => 'DMuKL8YtE7'
 
cryptoRandomString({length: 10, characters: 'abc'});
// => 'abaaccabac'

cryptoRandomString.async(options) add .async if you want to get a promise.

1

Simple function that gets you a token that is URL safe and has base64 encoding! It's a combination of 2 answers from above.

const randomToken = () => {
    crypto.randomBytes(64).toString('base64').replace(/\//g,'_').replace(/\+/g,'-');
}

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