175

I have an array of objects and I want to compare those objects on a specific object property. Here's my array:

var myArray = [
    {"ID": 1, "Cost": 200},
    {"ID": 2, "Cost": 1000},
    {"ID": 3, "Cost": 50},
    {"ID": 4, "Cost": 500}
]

I'd like to zero in on the "cost" specifically and a get a min and maximum value. I realize I can just grab the cost values and push them off into a javascript array and then run the Fast JavaScript Max/Min.

However is there an easier way to do this by bypassing the array step in the middle and going off the objects properties (in this case "Cost") directly?

17 Answers 17

286

Array.prototype.reduce() is good for stuff like this: to perform aggregate operations (like min, max, avg, etc.) on an array, and return a single result:

myArray.reduce(function(prev, curr) {
    return prev.Cost < curr.Cost ? prev : curr;
});

...or you can define that inner function with ES6 function syntax:

myArray.reduce((prev, curr) => prev.Cost < curr.Cost ? prev : curr);

If you want to be cute you can attach this to the Array prototype:

Array.prototype.hasMin = function(attrib) {
    return (this.length && this.reduce(function(prev, curr){ 
        return prev[attrib] < curr[attrib] ? prev : curr; 
    })) || null;
 }

Now you can just say:

myArray.hasMin('ID')  // result:  {"ID": 1, "Cost": 200}
myArray.hasMin('Cost')    // result: {"ID": 3, "Cost": 50}
myEmptyArray.hasMin('ID')   // result: null

Please note that if you intend to use this, it doesn't have full checks for every situation. If you pass in an array of primitive types, it will fail. If you check for a property that doesn't exist, or if not all the objects contain that property, you will get the last element. This version is a little more bulky, but has those checks:

Array.prototype.hasMin = function(attrib) {
    const checker = (o, i) => typeof(o) === 'object' && o[i]
    return (this.length && this.reduce(function(prev, curr){
        const prevOk = checker(prev, attrib);
        const currOk = checker(curr, attrib);
        if (!prevOk && !currOk) return {};
        if (!prevOk) return curr;
        if (!currOk) return prev;
        return prev[attrib] < curr[attrib] ? prev : curr; 
    })) || null;
 }
10
  • 22
    Best answer in my opinion. It doesn't modify the array and its far more concise than the answer that says "Creating an array, invoking array methods is overkill for this simple operation" Commented Sep 16, 2015 at 19:43
  • This is the absolute best answer for performance of large datasets (30+ columns / 100k rows).
    – cerd
    Commented May 11, 2016 at 15:03
  • 3
    Just wondering, when reduce checks the first element of the array won't prev.Cost be undefined? Or does it initiate as 0?
    – GrayedFox
    Commented Oct 21, 2017 at 13:11
  • 1
    Good point @Saheb. I just edited so it will return null in that case. Commented Oct 3, 2019 at 13:40
  • 1
    I also added some checks for other inputs that could cause issues, like non-objects, or if that property was missing from some of the objects. Ultimately it's getting a little heavy-handed for most cases I think. Commented Oct 3, 2019 at 13:53
70

One way is to loop through all elements and compare it to the highest/lowest value.

(Creating an array, invoking array methods is overkill for this simple operation).

 // There's no real number bigger than plus Infinity
var lowest = Number.POSITIVE_INFINITY;
var highest = Number.NEGATIVE_INFINITY;
var tmp;
for (var i=myArray.length-1; i>=0; i--) {
    tmp = myArray[i].Cost;
    if (tmp < lowest) lowest = tmp;
    if (tmp > highest) highest = tmp;
}
console.log(highest, lowest);
9
  • This makes sense, I've been stuck with thinking about comparing data inside the array to each other instead of an external high/low number. Commented Jan 14, 2012 at 19:01
  • 2
    The only thing I would change is setting lowest and highest is a bit redundant. I would rather loop one less time and set lowest=highest=myArray[0] and then start the loop at 1.
    – J. Holmes
    Commented Jan 14, 2012 at 19:13
  • 1
    @32bitkid Good point. should be myArray[0].Cost, though. But, if there's no first element, an error will be thrown. So, an additional check is needed, possibly undoing the small performance boost.
    – Rob W
    Commented Jan 14, 2012 at 19:17
  • 1
    @Wilt Yes, maintain another variable that gets updated when you've found a lowest value, i.e. var lowestObject; for (...) and if (tmp < lowest) { lowestObject = myArray[i]; lowest = tmp; }
    – Rob W
    Commented Mar 11, 2014 at 8:58
  • 3
    This answer is very old, before ECMAScript 2015 (ES6) went out. Was right at the time, but now that answer is a better option. Commented Sep 26, 2020 at 19:06
65

Using Math.min and Math.max:

var myArray = [
    { id: 1, cost: 200},
    { id: 2, cost: 1000},
    { id: 3, cost: 50},
    { id: 4, cost: 500}
]


var min = Math.min(...myArray.map(item => item.cost));
var max = Math.max(...myArray.map(item => item.cost));

console.log("min: " + min);
console.log("max: " + max);

2
  • I know it must be to late to ask but why do we need the spread operator like you did for myArray.map() I would appreciate the answer Commented Feb 25, 2021 at 21:46
  • 13
    Because the function Math.max takes multiple parameters and not an array. The spread operator will transform the array into a "list" of parameters. e.g.: Math.max(...[1,5,9]) is the equivalent of Math.max(1, 5, 9). Without the spread operator, Math.max(myArray) will return NaN (not a number) since the function expects multiple number parameters. I hope it is not to late to reply @NtshemboHlongwane ;)
    – JuZDePeche
    Commented Feb 27, 2021 at 19:23
36

Use sort, if you don't care about the array being modified.

myArray.sort(function (a, b) {
    return a.Cost - b.Cost
})

var min = myArray[0],
    max = myArray[myArray.length - 1]
3
  • 3
    a full sort isn't the fastest way to find min/max but i guess it'll work.
    – J. Holmes
    Commented Jan 14, 2012 at 18:46
  • 5
    Just be aware that this will modify myArray, which may not be expected.
    – ziesemer
    Commented Jan 14, 2012 at 18:46
  • 4
    Sorting an array is slower than traversing it. Sort complexity: O(nlog(n)), traversing an array: O(n) Commented Dec 16, 2019 at 14:00
31

Use Math functions and pluck out the values you want with map.

Here is the jsbin:

https://jsbin.com/necosu/1/edit?js,console

var myArray = [{
    "ID": 1,
    "Cost": 200
  }, {
    "ID": 2,
    "Cost": 1000
  }, {
    "ID": 3,
    "Cost": 50
  }, {
    "ID": 4,
    "Cost": 500
  }],

  min = Math.min.apply(null, myArray.map(function(item) {
    return item.Cost;
  })),
  max = Math.max.apply(null, myArray.map(function(item) {
    return item.Cost;
  }));

console.log('min', min);//50
console.log('max', max);//1000

UPDATE:

If you want to use ES6:

var min = Math.min.apply(null, myArray.map(item => item.Cost)),
    max = Math.max.apply(null, myArray.map(item => item.Cost));
1
  • 30
    In ES6 using Spread Operator, we no longer need apply. Simply say - Math.min(...myArray.map(o => o.Cost)) for finding the minimum and Math.max(...myArray.map(o => o.Cost)) for finding the maximum.
    – Nitin
    Commented Sep 1, 2016 at 18:47
17

Try (a is array, f is field to compare)

let max= (a,f)=> a.reduce((m,x)=> m[f]>x[f] ? m:x);
let min= (a,f)=> a.reduce((m,x)=> m[f]<x[f] ? m:x);

let max= (a,f)=> a.reduce((m,x)=> m[f]>x[f] ? m:x);
let min= (a,f)=> a.reduce((m,x)=> m[f]<x[f] ? m:x);

// TEST

var myArray = [
    {"ID": 1, "Cost": 200},
    {"ID": 2, "Cost": 1000},
    {"ID": 3, "Cost": 50},
    {"ID": 4, "Cost": 500}
]

console.log('Max Cost', max(myArray, 'Cost'));
console.log('Min Cost', min(myArray, 'Cost'));

console.log('Max ID', max(myArray, 'ID'));
console.log('Min ID', min(myArray, 'ID'));

2
  • 6
    Love this answer, so compact and easy to use.
    – Dean
    Commented Apr 22, 2020 at 3:04
  • I +1 what Dean said and feel it's VERY quickly to reason about in a glance. Commented Jun 26, 2022 at 15:00
16

I think Rob W's answer is really the right one (+1), but just for fun: if you wanted to be "clever", you could do something like this:

var myArray = 
[
    {"ID": 1, "Cost": 200},
    {"ID": 2, "Cost": 1000},
    {"ID": 3, "Cost": 50},
    {"ID": 4, "Cost": 500}
]

function finder(cmp, arr, attr) {
    var val = arr[0][attr];
    for(var i=1;i<arr.length;i++) {
        val = cmp(val, arr[i][attr])
    }
    return val;
}

alert(finder(Math.max, myArray, "Cost"));
alert(finder(Math.min, myArray, "Cost"));

or if you had a deeply nested structure, you could get a little more functional and do the following:

var myArray = 
[
    {"ID": 1, "Cost": { "Wholesale":200, Retail: 250 }},
    {"ID": 2, "Cost": { "Wholesale":1000, Retail: 1010 }},
    {"ID": 3, "Cost": { "Wholesale":50, Retail: 300 }},
    {"ID": 4, "Cost": { "Wholesale":500, Retail: 1050 }}
]

function finder(cmp, arr, getter) {
    var val = getter(arr[0]);
    for(var i=1;i<arr.length;i++) {
        val = cmp(val, getter(arr[i]))
    }
    return val;
}

alert(finder(Math.max, myArray, function(x) { return x.Cost.Wholesale; }));
alert(finder(Math.min, myArray, function(x) { return x.Cost.Retail; }));

These could easily be curried into more useful/specific forms.

6
  • 4
    I have benchmarked our solutions: jsperf.com/comparison-of-numbers. After optimizing your code (see the benchmark), the performance of both methods are similar. Without optimization, my method is 14x faster.
    – Rob W
    Commented Jan 14, 2012 at 19:12
  • 2
    @RoBW oh I would totally expect your version to be way faster, I was just providing an alternate architectural implementation. :)
    – J. Holmes
    Commented Jan 14, 2012 at 19:14
  • @32bitkid I expected the same, but surprisongly, the method is almost as fast (after optimizing), as seen at test case 3 of the benchmark.
    – Rob W
    Commented Jan 14, 2012 at 19:16
  • 1
    @RobW i agree, I would not have expected that. I'm intrigued. :) Goes to show that you should always benchmark rather than assume.
    – J. Holmes
    Commented Jan 14, 2012 at 19:16
  • @RobW Just to be clear though, I think with more browser results, your implementation would consistently beat either the unoptimized and optimized versions.
    – J. Holmes
    Commented Jan 14, 2012 at 19:21
9

for Max

Math.max.apply(Math, myArray.map(a => a.Cost));

for min

Math.min.apply(Math, myArray.map(a => a.Cost));
7

This can be achieved with lodash's minBy and maxBy functions.

Lodash's minBy and maxBy documentation

_.minBy(array, [iteratee=_.identity])

_.maxBy(array, [iteratee=_.identity])

These methods accept an iteratee which is invoked for each element in array to generate the criterion by which the value is ranked. The iteratee is invoked with one argument: (value).

Solution

var myArray = [
    {"ID": 1, "Cost": 200},
    {"ID": 2, "Cost": 1000},
    {"ID": 3, "Cost": 50},
    {"ID": 4, "Cost": 500}
]

const minimumCostItem = _.minBy(myArray, "Cost");

console.log("Minimum cost item: ", minimumCostItem);

// Getting the maximum using a functional iteratee
const maximumCostItem = _.maxBy(myArray, function(entry) {
  return entry["Cost"];
});

console.log("Maximum cost item: ", maximumCostItem);
<script src="https://cdnjs.cloudflare.com/ajax/libs/lodash.js/4.17.15/lodash.js"></script>

6

For a concise, modern solution, one can perform a reduce operation over the array, keeping track of the current minimum and maximum values, so the array is only iterated over once (which is optimal).

let [min, max] = myArray.reduce(([prevMin,prevMax], {Cost})=>
   [Math.min(prevMin, Cost), Math.max(prevMax, Cost)], [Infinity, -Infinity]);

Demo:

var myArray = [
    {"ID": 1, "Cost": 200},
    {"ID": 2, "Cost": 1000},
    {"ID": 3, "Cost": 50},
    {"ID": 4, "Cost": 500}
]
let [min, max] = myArray.reduce(([prevMin,prevMax], {Cost})=>
   [Math.min(prevMin, Cost), Math.max(prevMax, Cost)], [Infinity, -Infinity]);
console.log("Min cost:", min);
console.log("Max cost:", max);

0
5

Using Array.prototype.reduce(), you can plug in comparator functions to determine the min, max, etc. item in an array.

var items = [
  { name : 'Apple',  count : 3  },
  { name : 'Banana', count : 10 },
  { name : 'Orange', count : 2  },
  { name : 'Mango',  count : 8  }
];

function findBy(arr, key, comparatorFn) {
  return arr.reduce(function(prev, curr, index, arr) { 
    return comparatorFn.call(arr, prev[key], curr[key]) ? prev : curr; 
  });
}

function minComp(prev, curr) {
  return prev < curr;
}

function maxComp(prev, curr) {
  return prev > curr;
}

document.body.innerHTML  = 'Min: ' + findBy(items, 'count', minComp).name + '<br />';
document.body.innerHTML += 'Max: ' + findBy(items, 'count', maxComp).name;

3

This is more better solution

    var myArray = [
    {"ID": 1, "Cost": 200},
    {"ID": 2, "Cost": 1000},
    {"ID": 3, "Cost": 50},
    {"ID": 4, "Cost": 500}
    ]
    var lowestNumber = myArray[0].Cost;
    var highestNumber = myArray[0].Cost;

    myArray.forEach(function (keyValue, index, myArray) {
      if(index > 0) {
        if(keyValue.Cost < lowestNumber){
          lowestNumber = keyValue.Cost;
        }
        if(keyValue.Cost > highestNumber) {
          highestNumber = keyValue.Cost;
        }
      }
    });
    console.log('lowest number' , lowestNumber);
    console.log('highest Number' , highestNumber);
3

Adding onto Tristan Reid's answer (+ using es6), you could create a function that accepts a callback, which will contain the operator you want to be applied to the prev and curr:

const compare = (arr, key, callback) => arr.reduce((prev, curr) =>
    (callback(prev[key], curr[key]) ? prev : curr), {})[key];

    // remove `[key]` to return the whole object

Then you could simply call it using:

const costMin = compare(myArray, 'Cost', (a, b) => a < b);
const costMax = compare(myArray, 'Cost', (a, b) => a > b);
1

we can solve problem by two approach both method is already explained above but the performance test was missing so completing that one

1, native java-script way
2, first sort object then it easy to get min max from sorted obj

i also test performance of both tow approach

you can also run and test performance... Happy coding (:

//first approach 

var myArray = [
    {"ID": 1, "Cost": 200},
    {"ID": 2, "Cost": 1000},
    {"ID": 3, "Cost": 50},
    {"ID": 4, "Cost": 500}
]

var t1 = performance.now();;

let max=Math.max.apply(Math, myArray.map(i=>i.Cost))

let min=Math.min.apply(Math, myArray.map(i=>i.Cost))

var t2   = performance.now();;

console.log("native fuction took " + (t2 - t1) + " milliseconds.");

console.log("max Val:"+max)
console.log("min Val:"+min)

//  Second approach:


function sortFunc (a, b) {
    return a.Cost - b.Cost
} 

var s1 = performance.now();;
sortedArray=myArray.sort(sortFunc)


var minBySortArray = sortedArray[0],
    maxBySortArray = sortedArray[myArray.length - 1]
    
var s2   = performance.now();;
 console.log("sort funciton took  " + (s2 - s1) + " milliseconds.");  
console.log("max ValBySortArray :"+max)
console.log("min Val BySortArray:"+min)

1
max = totalAVG.reduce(function (a, b) { return Math.max(a, b)}, -Infinity);

min = totalAVG.reduce(function (a, b) {return Math.min(a, b)}, Infinity);
-1

Another one, similar to Kennebec's answer, but all in one line:

maxsort = myArray.slice(0).sort(function (a, b) { return b.ID - a.ID })[0].ID; 
-1

You can use built-in Array object to use Math.max/Math.min instead:

var arr = [1,4,2,6,88,22,344];

var max = Math.max.apply(Math, arr);// return 344
var min = Math.min.apply(Math, arr);// return 1
0

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