I've got a nested loop construct like this:

for (Type type : types) {
    for (Type t : types2) {
         if (some condition) {
             // Do something and break...
             break; // Breaks out of the inner loop
         }
    }
}

Now how can I break out of both loops. I've looked at similar questions, but none concerns Java specifically. I couldn't apply these solutions because most used gotos.

I don't want to put the inner loop in a different method.

Update: I don't want to rerun the loops, when breaking I'm finished with the execution of the loop block.

31 Answers 31

up vote 2165 down vote accepted

Like other answerers, I'd definitely prefer to put the loops in a different method, at which point you can just return to stop iterating completely. This answer just shows how the requirements in the question can be met.

You can use break with a label for the outer loop. For example:

public class Test {
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        outerloop:
        for (int i=0; i < 5; i++) {
            for (int j=0; j < 5; j++) {
                if (i * j > 6) {
                    System.out.println("Breaking");
                    break outerloop;
                }
                System.out.println(i + " " + j);
            }
        }
        System.out.println("Done");
    }
}

This prints:

0 0
0 1
0 2
0 3
0 4
1 0
1 1
1 2
1 3
1 4
2 0
2 1
2 2
2 3
Breaking
Done
  • 254
    This does jump to directly after the loop. Try it! Yes, the label comes before the loop, but that's because it's labeling the loop, rather than the place you want to exit to. (You can continue with a label too.) – Jon Skeet May 20 '09 at 9:15
  • 2
    Perl also does permits this its own label system. I think a lot of languages do -- it hardly surprises me that it is in Java. – Evan Carroll Dec 6 '11 at 22:53
  • 9
    @Evan - that claim is clearly true - in languages that promise that it's true. But Java doesn't make that promise. If a language is in conflict with your assumptions, it's possible that it's your assumptions that are at fault. In this case, I think you're still partly right - principle of least surprise WRT the many who never heard of (or forgot about) that form of break. Even then, exceptions are another better-known exception (sorry). But I'd still be unhappy about this if it wasn't obvious (small loops, warning comment if the label/break still aren't visible enough). – Steve314 Dec 7 '11 at 0:40
  • 2
    @JWiley. Same here; easier to read: when you "hit" return, you can stop reading - easier to maintain: when fixing something before the return, you do not have to worry for side effects outside of the loop. IMHO, returning fast usually leads to more compact, simpler code. – Bruno Grieder Mar 20 '13 at 10:05
  • 4
    @MuhammadBabar: outerloop is a label. I don't know exactly what code you tried, but the code in my answer compiles and runs just fine. – Jon Skeet Feb 2 '15 at 10:47

Technically the correct answer is to label the outer loop. In practice if you want to exit at any point inside an inner loop then you would be better off externalizing the code into a method (a static method if needs be) and then call it.

That would pay off for readability.

The code would become something like that:

private static String search(...) 
{
    for (Type type : types) {
        for (Type t : types2) {
            if (some condition) {
                // Do something and break...
                return search;
            }
        }
    }
    return null; 
}

Matching the example for the accepted answer:

 public class Test {
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        loop();
        System.out.println("Done");
    }

    public static void loop() {
        for (int i = 0; i < 5; i++) {
            for (int j = 0; j < 5; j++) {
                if (i * j > 6) {
                    System.out.println("Breaking");
                    return;
                }
                System.out.println(i + " " + j);
            }
        }
    }
}
  • 21
    Sometimes you use several local variables that's outside of the inner loop, passing them all in can feel clunky. – Haoest Dec 7 '11 at 1:15
  • 1
    So how is this solution supposed to print "Done" as in the accepted answer? – JohnDoe Dec 7 '11 at 10:02
  • 1
    @JohnDoe you call it and then you print System.out.println("done"); try { } finally { } within the search method is also an option. – Zo72 May 16 '12 at 14:32
  • 2
    This is better practice I guess, but what happens if you want to continue instead of breaking? Labels support either equally well (or badly!) but I'm not sure how to convert this logic for a continue. – Robert Grant Oct 25 '13 at 10:01
  • @RobertGrant If you want to continue instead of break, move the outer loop outside of the loop method and return from method to continue. – Muhd Aug 1 '16 at 20:35

You can use a named block around the loops:

search: {
    for (Type type : types) {
        for (Type t : types2) {
            if (some condition) {
                // Do something and break...
                break search;
            }
        }
    }
}
  • 30
    You don't need to create a new block to use a label. – Jon Skeet May 20 '09 at 9:13
  • 69
    No, but it makes the intent a lot clearer. See the first comment on the accepted answer. – Bombe May 20 '09 at 9:24
  • 2
    its not actually a named block, after label you can write any Java expression as without label, does name: if(...){...} makes named condition? :) – La VloZ Merrill Apr 21 '16 at 21:18
  • 1
    This construct has a big advantage over labelling the for directly. You can add code before the last } that will be executed only if the condition was never met. – Florian F Aug 25 at 20:24

I never use labels. It seems like a bad practice to get into. Here's what I would do:

boolean finished = false;
for (int i = 0; i < 5 && !finished; i++) {
    for (int j = 0; j < 5; j++) {
        if (i * j > 6) {
            finished = true;
            break;
        }
    }
}
  • 4
    Shouldn't this be && !finished instead of || !finished? And why then use break at all and not use && !finished for the inner loop too? – Gandalf Jul 12 '13 at 11:29
  • 4
    I use break to be able to arbitrarily exit the loop. If there's code after that if block, you can break before it executes. But you're right about &&. Fixed it. – Elle Mundy Jul 29 '13 at 16:44
  • 2
    nice solution! that's exactly how I'd do it in practice if putting it in an extra function is not preferable for some reason. – benroth Dec 10 '13 at 19:50
  • 6
    There is a potential issue if there is some logic after the inner loop... which will continue to get executed and the outer loop breaks only when the new iteration starts... – Karthik Karuppannan Feb 3 '16 at 15:58
  • 7
    I don't understand why one should do it like that. People working with code should be able use all the features of a language. I get that it's important to write code others can understand, but not by restricting the use of official tools provided by a language and find workarounds for the same functionality. Or did you mean something else by "bad practice"? – codepleb Oct 11 '16 at 9:32

You can use labels:

label1: 
for (int i = 0;;) {
    for (int g = 0;;) {
      break label1;
    }
}
  • 1
    Unfair, this answer is also correct. But only 55 upvotes.. – WesternGun Jul 6 '17 at 12:54
  • It's also much simpler to read. – dirtysocks45 Oct 28 '17 at 13:56
  • Have a +1 from me. Simple, to the point, answers the question. Can't be accused of repeating an existing answer because you answered at the same time. – Heimdall Dec 7 at 16:31

maybe with a function?

public void doSomething(List<Type> types, List<Type> types2){
  for(Type t1 : types){
    for (Type t : types2) {
      if (some condition) {
         //do something and return...
         return;
      }
    }
  }
}

You can use a temporary variable:

boolean outerBreak = false;
for (Type type : types) {
   if(outerBreak) break;
    for (Type t : types2) {
         if (some condition) {
             // Do something and break...
             outerBreak = true;
             break; // Breaks out of the inner loop
         }
    }
}

Depending on your function, you can also exit/return from the inner loop:

for (Type type : types) {
    for (Type t : types2) {
         if (some condition) {
             // Do something and break...
             return;
         }
    }
}
  • 7
    I find this way kind of cluttered. – boutta May 20 '09 at 9:19
  • 6
    Clumsy and error-prone IMHO. – orbfish Oct 19 '11 at 18:42
  • 9
    An extra condition check every time through the loop? No thanks. – ryandenki Dec 7 '11 at 4:29

If you don't like breaks and gotos, you can use a "traditional" for loop instead the for-in, with an extra abort condition:

int a, b;
bool abort = false;
for (a = 0; a < 10 && !abort; a++) {
    for (b = 0; b < 10 && !abort; b++) {
        if (condition) {
            doSomeThing();
            abort = true;
        }
    }
}
  • Not suitable to foreach loops. – John McClane Dec 5 at 0:00
  • @JohnMcClane And you're spamming this on many answers on a 9+ year old question because...? – Quintec Dec 7 at 1:03

I needed to do a similar thing, but I chose not to use the enhanced for loop to do it.

int s = type.size();
for (int i = 0; i < s; i++) {
    for (int j = 0; j < t.size(); j++) {
        if (condition) {
            // do stuff after which you want 
            // to completely break out of both loops
            s = 0; // enables the _main_ loop to terminate
            break;
        }
    }
}
  • I don't find it cool to iterate all the items after the condition is broken. Thus I would add a break in the else case. – boutta Jan 29 '16 at 7:58
  • @boutta I'm not sure how you're reaching this conclusion. Once the condition is true, both loops are exited. – Swifty McSwifterton Jul 31 '16 at 16:53
  • OK, I didn't get the part with the manipulation of the 's' var. But I find that kind of bad style since s is representing the size. Then I prefer the answer from ddyer with explicit vars: stackoverflow.com/a/25124317/15108 – boutta Nov 10 '16 at 8:56
  • @boutta You can change s to a value which is lower than i or change i to a value greater or equal than s, both should do the trick. You're right about changing s, because it can be used elsewhere later, but changing i won't harm, just will make sure the first for won't continue looping. – Zsolti Sep 27 '17 at 12:44

I prefer to add an explicit "exit" to the loop tests. It makes it clear to any casual reader that the loop may terminate early.

boolean earlyExit = false;
for(int i = 0 ; i < 10 && !earlyExit; i++) {
     for(int j = 0 ; i < 10 && !earlyExit; j++) { earlyExit = true; }
}
  • Not suitable to foreach loops. – John McClane Dec 4 at 23:39

Java 8 Stream solution:

List<Type> types1 = ...
List<Type> types2 = ...

types1.stream()
      .flatMap(type1 -> types2.stream().map(type2 -> new Type[]{type1, type2}))
      .filter(types -> /**some condition**/)
      .findFirst()
      .ifPresent(types -> /**do something**/);

You can break from all loops without using any label: and flags.

It's just tricky solution.

Here condition1 is the condition which is used to break from loop K and J. And condition2 is the condition which is used to break from loop K , J and I.

For example:

public class BreakTesting {
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        for (int i = 0; i < 9; i++) {
            for (int j = 0; j < 9; j++) {
                for (int k = 0; k < 9; k++) {
                    if (condition1) {
                        System.out.println("Breaking from Loop K and J");
                        k = 9;
                        j = 9;
                    }
                    if (condition2) {
                        System.out.println("Breaking from Loop K, J and I");
                        k = 9;
                        j = 9;
                        i = 9;
                    }
                }
            }
        }
        System.out.println("End of I , J , K");
    }
}
  • 1
    How would I use this with for-each loops? ;) – Willi Mentzel Jul 4 '15 at 11:18
  • 5
    This doesn't work if you have a more sophisticated loop condition, like list.size()>5. Also it is really just a hack. It's hard to read and bad practice! – Lonely Neuron Oct 26 '15 at 3:06
  • It is error-prone. Imagine you changed the inner loop to (int k = 0; k < 10; k++) and you didn't fix all of the k = 9 to k = 10. You might get into an infinite loop. – Florian F Aug 25 at 20:07

Rather for a long I was thinking to share this type of answer for this type of question.

Usually such cases are come in scope of a more meaningful logic, let's say some searching or manipulating over some of the iterated 'for'-objects in question, so I usually use the functional approach:

public Object searching(Object[] types) {//or manipulating
    List<Object> typesReferences = new ArrayList<Object>();
    List<Object> typesReferences2 = new ArrayList<Object>();

    for (Object type : typesReferences) {
        Object o = getByCriterion(typesReferences2, type);
        if(o != null) return o; 
    }
    return null;
}
private Object getByCriterion(List<Object> typesReferences2, Object criterion) {
    for (Object typeReference : typesReferences2) {
        if(typeReference.equals(criterion)) {
             // here comes other complex or specific logic || typeReference.equals(new Object())
             return typeReference;
        }
    }
    return null;
}

Major cons:

  • roughly twice more lines
  • more consumption of computing cycles, meaning it is slower from algorithmic point-of-view
  • more typing work

The pros:

  • the higher ratio to separation of concerns because of functional granularity
  • the higher ratio of re-usability and control of searching/manipulating logic without
  • the methods are not long, thus they are more compact and easier to comprehend
  • subjectively higher ratio of readability

So it is just handling the case via a different approach.

Basically a question to the author of this question: what do you consider of this approach?

If it is inside some function why don't you just return it:

for (Type type : types) {
    for (Type t : types2) {
         if (some condition) {
            return value;
         }
    }
}
  • I prefer this pattern. It has often caused me to break out the loops into a separate function. My code has always been better after doing so, so for this reason I really like this answer. – Bill K Dec 2 '17 at 0:34

Best and Easy Method..

outerloop:
for(int i=0; i<10; i++){
    // here we can break Outer loop by 
    break outerloop;

    innerloop:
    for(int i=0; i<10; i++){
        // here we can break innerloop by 
        break innerloop;
     }
}
  • 4
    These examples of breaking are imho not very helpful, because even without the label they would break at the same point. Also it's always nice to have code which you can actually execute, which is not the case with your code, since the innerloop can never be reached.. – Lonely Neuron Oct 26 '15 at 3:05
  • I was going to type the same thing. The labels are somewhat useless in this case. – Taslim Jan 12 at 10:36

Rather unusual approach but in terms of code length (not performance) this is the easiest thing you could do:

for(int i = 0; i++; i < j) {
    if(wanna exit) {
        i = i + j; // if more nested, also add the 
                   // maximum value for the other loops
    }
}

Use Labels.

INNER:for(int j = 0; j < numbers.length; j++) {
    System.out.println("Even number: " + i + ", break  from INNER label");
    break INNER;
}

Refer to this article

Another one solution, mentioned without example (it actually works in prod code).

try {
    for (Type type : types) {
        for (Type t : types2) {
            if (some condition #1) {
                // Do something and break the loop.
                throw new BreakLoopException();
            }
        }
    }
}
catch (BreakLoopException e) {
    // Do something on look breaking.
}

Of course BreakLoopException should be internal, private and accelerated with no-stack-trace:

private static class BreakLoopException extends Exception {
    @Override
    public StackTraceElement[] getStackTrace() {
        return new StackTraceElement[0];
    }
}
  • 1
    It has been mentioned actually, in an answer getting -23 votes... stackoverflow.com/a/886980/2516301 . It will do the work, but it is a very bad programming practice... – vefthym Oct 10 '14 at 14:09
  • indeed. however I saw such legacy code - 4-levels nested loops with several breaking conditions. and it was more readable with exceptions rather than with inlined code. -23 votes is mostly emotional rating, but yes - this approach should be used carefully. – ursa Oct 10 '14 at 14:22
  • 1
    It would have been even more readable if it had been broken out into a separate function call with a center-return. Often made even better by a little refactor so it makes sense as a stand-alone (often reusable) function. – Bill K Dec 2 '17 at 0:37
boolean broken = false; // declared outside of the loop for efficiency
for (Type type : types) {
    for (Type t : types2) {
        if (some condition) {
            broken = true;
            break;
        }
    }

    if (broken) {
        break;
    }
}

I wanted to answer this question but was marked as a duplicate which prevents me from posting as well. So posting it here instead !

If its a new implementation you can try re-writing the logic as if-else_if-else statements.

while(keep_going) {

    if(keep_going && condition_one_holds) {
        // code
    }
    if(keep_going && condition_two_holds) {
        // code
    }
    if(keep_going && condition_three_holds) {
        // code
    }
    if(keep_going && something_goes_really_bad) {
        keep_going=false;
    }
    if(keep_going && condition_four_holds) {
        // code
    }
    if(keep_going && condition_five_holds) {
        // code
    }   
}

Otherwise you can try setting a flag when that special condition has occured and check for that flag in each of your loop-conditions.

something_bad_has_happened = false;
while(something is true && !something_bad_has_happened){
    // code, things happen
    while(something else && !something_bad_has_happened){
        // lots of code, things happens
        if(something happened){
            -> Then control should be returned ->
            something_bad_has_happened=true;
            continue;
        }
    }   
    if(something_bad_has_happened) { // things below will not be executed
        continue;
    }

    // other things may happen here as well but will not be executed
    //  once control is returned from the inner cycle
}

HERE! So, while a simple break will not work, it can be made to work using continue.

If you are simply porting the logic from one programming language to java and just want to get the thing working you can try using labels

Demo for break, continue, label.

So java keywords break and continue have default value, it's the "Nearest Loop", Toady a few years after use Java, I just got it !

It's seem used rare, but useful.

import org.junit.Test;

/**
 * Created by cui on 17-5-4.
 */

public class BranchLabel {
    @Test
    public void test() {
        System.out.println("testBreak");
        testBreak();

        System.out.println("testBreakLabel");
        testBreakLabel();

        System.out.println("testContinue");
        testContinue();

        System.out.println("testContinueLabel");
        testContinueLabel();

    }

    /**
     testBreak
     a=0,b=0
     a=0,b=1
     a=1,b=0
     a=1,b=1
     a=2,b=0
     a=2,b=1
     a=3,b=0
     a=3,b=1
     a=4,b=0
     a=4,b=1
     */
    public void testBreak() {
        for (int a = 0; a < 5; a++) {
            for (int b = 0; b < 5; b++) {
                if (b == 2) {
                    break;
                }
                System.out.println("a=" + a + ",b=" + b);
            }
        }
    }

    /**
     testContinue
     a=0,b=0
     a=0,b=1
     a=0,b=3
     a=0,b=4
     a=1,b=0
     a=1,b=1
     a=1,b=3
     a=1,b=4
     a=2,b=0
     a=2,b=1
     a=2,b=3
     a=2,b=4
     a=3,b=0
     a=3,b=1
     a=3,b=3
     a=3,b=4
     a=4,b=0
     a=4,b=1
     a=4,b=3
     a=4,b=4
     */
    public void testContinue() {
        for (int a = 0; a < 5; a++) {
            for (int b = 0; b < 5; b++) {
                if (b == 2) {
                    continue;
                }
                System.out.println("a=" + a + ",b=" + b);
            }
        }
    }

    /**
     testBreakLabel
     a=0,b=0,c=0
     a=0,b=0,c=1
     * */
    public void testBreakLabel() {
        anyName:
        for (int a = 0; a < 5; a++) {
            for (int b = 0; b < 5; b++) {
                for (int c = 0; c < 5; c++) {
                    if (c == 2) {
                        break anyName;
                    }
                    System.out.println("a=" + a + ",b=" + b + ",c=" + c);
                }
            }
        }
    }

    /**
     testContinueLabel
     a=0,b=0,c=0
     a=0,b=0,c=1
     a=1,b=0,c=0
     a=1,b=0,c=1
     a=2,b=0,c=0
     a=2,b=0,c=1
     a=3,b=0,c=0
     a=3,b=0,c=1
     a=4,b=0,c=0
     a=4,b=0,c=1
     */
    public void testContinueLabel() {
        anyName:
        for (int a = 0; a < 5; a++) {
            for (int b = 0; b < 5; b++) {
                for (int c = 0; c < 5; c++) {
                    if (c == 2) {
                        continue anyName;
                    }
                    System.out.println("a=" + a + ",b=" + b + ",c=" + c);
                }
            }
        }
    }

}

for (int j = 0; j < 5; j++) //inner loop should be replaced with for (int j = 0; j < 5 && !exitloops; j++).

Here, in this case complete nested loops should be exit if condition is True . But if we use exitloops only to the upper loop

 for (int i = 0; i < 5 && !exitloops; i++) //upper loop

Then inner loop will continues, because there is no extra flag that notify this inner loop to exit.

Example : if i = 3 and j=2 then condition is false. But in next iteration of inner loop j=3 then condition (i*j) become 9 which is true but inner loop will be continue till j become 5.

So, it must use exitloops to the inner loops too.

boolean exitloops = false;
for (int i = 0; i < 5 && !exitloops; i++) { //here should exitloops as a Conditional Statement to get out from the loops if exitloops become true. 
    for (int j = 0; j < 5 && !exitloops; j++) { //here should also use exitloops as a Conditional Statement. 
        if (i * j > 6) {
            exitloops = true;
            System.out.println("Inner loop still Continues For i * j is => "+i*j);
            break;
        }
        System.out.println(i*j);
    }
}

Like @1800 INFORMATION suggestion, use the condition that breaks the inner loop as a condition on the outer loop:

boolean hasAccess = false;
for (int i = 0; i < x && hasAccess == false; i++){
    for (int j = 0; j < y; j++){
        if (condition == true){
            hasAccess = true;
            break;
        }
    }
}

You can do the following:

  1. set a local variable to false

  2. set that variable true in the first loop, when you want to break

  3. then you can check in the outer loop, that whether the condition is set then break from the outer loop as well.

    boolean isBreakNeeded = false;
    for (int i = 0; i < some.length; i++) {
        for (int j = 0; j < some.lengthasWell; j++) {
            //want to set variable if (){
            isBreakNeeded = true;
            break;
        }
    
        if (isBreakNeeded) {
            break; //will make you break from the outer loop as well
        }
    }
    

For some cases, We can use while loop effectively here.

Random rand = new Random();
// Just an example
for (int k = 0; k < 10; ++k) {
    int count = 0;
    while (!(rand.nextInt(200) == 100)) {
       count++;
    }

    results[k] = count;
}

Even creating a flag for outer loop and checking that after each execution of inner loop can be the answer.

Like this :

for (Type type : types) {
    boolean flag=false;
    for (Type t : types2) {
        if (some condition) {
            // Do something and break...
            flag=true;
            break; // Breaks out of the inner loop
        }
    }
    if(flag)
        break;
}
boolean condition = false;
for (Type type : types) {
    for (int i = 0; i < otherTypes.size && !condition; i ++) {
        condition = true; // if your condition is satisfied
    }
}

Use condition as a flag for when you are done processing. Then the inner loop only continues on while the condition has not been met. Either way the outer loop will keep on chuggin'.

Java does not have a goto feature like there is in C++. But still, goto is a reserved keyword in Java. They might implement it in the future. For your question, the answer is that there is something called label in Java to which you can apply a continue and break statement. Find the code below:

public static void main(String ...args) {
    outerLoop: for(int i=0;i<10;i++) {
    for(int j=10;j>0;j--) {
        System.out.println(i+" "+j);
        if(i==j) {
            System.out.println("Condition Fulfilled");
            break outerLoop;
        }
    }
    }
    System.out.println("Got out of the outer loop");
}

You just use label for breaking inner loops

public class Test {
public static void main(String[] args) {
    outerloop:
for (int i=0; i < 5; i++) {
  for (int j=0; j < 5; j++) {
    if (i * j > 6) {
      System.out.println("Breaking");
      break outerloop;
    }
    System.out.println(i + " " + j);
  }
}
System.out.println("Done");
}
}
  • 2
    What is the difference from the accepted answer? – vefthym May 21 '14 at 14:49

Check if the inner loop is exited with an if statement, by checking the inner loop's variable. You could also create another variable such as a boolean to check if the inner loop is exited.

In this example it uses the inner loop's variable to check if it has been exited:

int i, j;
for(i = 0; i < 7; i++){

for(j = 0; j < 5; j++) {

     if (some condition) {
         // Do something and break...
         break; // Breaks out of the inner loop
     }
}
     if(j < 5){    // Checks if inner loop wasn't finished
     break;    // Breaks out of the outer loop   
     } 
}

protected by Gilbert Le Blanc Jul 29 '13 at 17:04

Thank you for your interest in this question. Because it has attracted low-quality or spam answers that had to be removed, posting an answer now requires 10 reputation on this site (the association bonus does not count).

Would you like to answer one of these unanswered questions instead?

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.