7

I have a parent div gal1, inside which there can be further divs and content, but only one img element without an id as you can see below. Now I want to use only Javascript (no jQuery) to change the style of this image, using gal1 as argument (because the rest of the structure inside this div may vary, only this one image will always be there somewhere). I couldn't find any other stackoverflow question that addresses exactly my situation.

<div class="gallery-preview" id="gal1">
    <div class="gallery-preview-img" id="gal-img1">
        <img src="galleries/kevin-carls/Monks.jpg">
    </div>
    <div class="gallery-preview-text" id="gal-text1">
        <span class="gallery-name" href="">Road to India</span><br/>
        <span class="artist-name" href="">Kevin Carls</span>
    </div>
</div>
  • Is the depth of the img element inside the div with an id of gal1 known? – kinakuta Jan 16 '12 at 7:08
  • It is better to assume that it isn't known. – Abhranil Das Jan 16 '12 at 7:09
25

Than you can make use of method called getElementsByTagName('img') than you should get image and update it.

document.getElementById(gal1).getElementsByTagName('img');
  • Okay, I'm looking for some info on this. Meanwhile, could you expand your answer with an example on how you would use it in my case? – Abhranil Das Jan 16 '12 at 7:08
  • This would work well as long as it's called on the node representing the ancestor gal1 div. NM - I see your code fragment does just this. – kinakuta Jan 16 '12 at 7:10
2

get the content by using id, and then query images by using getElementsByTagName

function getImages(contentId) {
    var content = document.getElementById(contentId);
    // only one image, just return an item; or you can return an array
    if (content) return document.getElementsByTagName('img')[0];
}
  • 1
    Same solution, but +1 because you're new. – Abhranil Das Jan 16 '12 at 8:12
1

You can insert CSS which may be more efficient if you have to do this in more than this single case.

http://jsfiddle.net/65Ggv/

var style_rules = [];    
style_rules.push("#gal1 img { border: 3px solid green; } ");    
var style = style_rules.join("\n");

var el=document.createElement("style");
el.appendChild(document.createTextNode(style));
el.type="text/css";
document.head.appendChild(el);
  • I do indeed need to do this for many cases. Your solution sounds good, but I'm still new to web-designing, so I'll take some time getting my head around it. – Abhranil Das Jan 16 '12 at 7:54
1

Unless you absolutely need to pick the colors or border sizes dynamically, which I doubt because you are an admitted beginner, stuffing stylesheets in with Javascript is a Rube Goldberg device. It seems nifty to be able to do this, but if your application is important to you, you will regret it. (You might as well use innerHTML to stuff in a stylesheet in that case -- at least it will be faster than making DOM calls.)

Pranay Rana's answer to use getElementsByTagName is the best option if your constraints are actually stable (only one img). Obtain an element reference el, to gal1, using getElementById, then var myimg = el.getElementsByTagName("img") and you are almost done.

If you insist upon funking with the style nodes, you can stuff whatever properties you want into the style property of myimg. It becomes inline style.

Even so, you almost certainly do not need to stuff in novel rules, and changing inline style is often avoidable. It is more predictable and stable to modify the class attribute on myimg, and use a predefined set of style classes for the cases you need to handle. This will give a nice clean separation of the style from the script, and avoid both the in-lining of the style rules and run-time mutilation of the style tree by code injection.

  • For my particular application I am afraid I would need to change inline style rather than a class attribute. Essentially I compare the img's height and width. Depending on which is bigger, I either set it a height value or a width value and let the other scale. – Abhranil Das Jan 16 '12 at 16:09
  • 2
    CSS3 has background-size: cover; and background-size: contain; which could be useful in such situations as well. – jerseyboy Feb 4 '12 at 20:32
  • +1: Although I don't need this for this question, it'll come in handy for something else that I want to do on the same project. – Abhranil Das Feb 5 '12 at 7:01

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