281
votes

I am doing some research into common errors and poor assumptions made by junior (and perhaps senior) software engineers.

What was your longest-held assumption that was eventually corrected?

For example, I misunderstood that the size of an integer is not a standard and instead depends on the language and target. A bit embarrassing to state, but there it is.

Be frank; what firm belief did you have, and roughly how long did you maintain the assumption? It can be about an algorithm, a language, a programming concept, testing, or anything else about programming, programming languages, or computer science.

closed as not constructive by Kev Jan 27 '12 at 1:55

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195 Answers 195

1
vote

The specs are complete and suffient

1
vote

That an html element id and name attribute where interchangable.

It turns out that elements with 'name' attributes are related/used.referenced for POSTs etc and 'id' attributes are used for DOM reference.

1
vote

thread = process

1
vote

That an identity column cannot contain duplicate values: identity column in Sql server

0
votes

Of course you could look at FindBugs and PMD but these are my favorite gotchas and tricks (all Java):

Fields are not overridden, they are shadowed.

There is no explicit super.super access.

Classes with no constructors defined have an implicit zero-argument constructor. I made a practical error related to this one this year.

To get a reference to an inner class's parent you can use the syntax "Outer.this" to disambiguate method calls or synchronize.

Classes are "friends of themselves" in C++ terms, private methods and fields of any instance of that class can be referenced from any method of the same class, even static methods. This would have made some of my early clone() and copy constructors much simpler.

Protected methods and fields are accessable in a static context of extending classes, but only if that class is in the same package. I'm glad that flex.messaging.io.amf isn't a sealed package.

  • Okay, which language is this? I'm pretty sure it isn't C or C++. – David Thornley May 20 '09 at 15:57
  • Java. FindBugs and PMD are Java static analysis tools. – Alan May 20 '09 at 16:12
0
votes

That salesmen manage customer expectations realistically. (Trained in under-promising and over-delivering)

That software requirements generally come from market research.

0
votes

He said he knew programming, it must be true!

0
votes

That dimension n is an instance of dimension (n+1) when they're equivalent.

0
votes

Thinking I'm the only one person that makes a piece of code... then when I need that routine I can't remember what I did and simply copy/paste my own code.

Now, I know that everybody does that.

0
votes

When i was learning algorithms in my junior middle school, i thought NPC as just non-polynomial problems, which meant the complexity of this problem was no more simple than polynomial. I didn't recognize i was wrong until i learned computational theory in my college -_-b

0
votes

A program can eventually have all of its problems ironed out.

0
votes

that:

for (int i = 0; i < myObj.variable; i = i + 1)

gets optimized to:

int j = myObj.variable; 
for (int i = 0; i < j; i = i + 1)

wow, i stopped putting in function calls in the place of j when I realized that they were being run EVERY time!

Reason:

for (int i = 0; i < myObj.variable; i = i + 1){ 
    if (function_argument == NULL){ 
        myObj.variable++; 
    } else { 
        printf("%d", myObj.variable);
    }
}

is not the same as:

int j = myObj.variable;
for (int i = 0; i < j; i = i + 1){ 
    if (function_argument == NULL){ 
        myObj.variable++; 
    } else { 
        printf("%d", myObj.variable);
    }
}

arbitrary example, but you can see how the optimization would change execution.

  • How is this incorrect? – Adam Harte Dec 15 '10 at 6:11
  • Make sense now? – chacham15 Dec 16 '10 at 9:03
-1
votes

@Kyralessa: It's worth noting that on most processors, in assembly/machine language, it's possible for functions to return someplace other than their caller while leaving the stack in good condition. Indeed, there are a variety of situations where this can be useful. One variation I first saw on the 6502, though it works even better on the Z80, was a print-message routine where the text to be printed immediately followed the call instruction; execution would resume after the zero terminator (or, as a slight optimization when using the Z80, at the zero terminator, since letting the zero byte be executed as a NOP would be cheaper than trying to avoid it).

It's also interesting to note that in many modern languages, functions have one normal exit point (which will resume execution following the call) but can also exit by throwing an exception. Even in C, one can use setjmp/longjmp to simulate such behavior.

  • 3
    Who are you speaking to, exactly? If you had made this a comment under @Kyralessa's answer, rather than a separate answer, we might have been able to follow the thread a little better. – Robert Harvey Dec 19 '10 at 19:11
  • @Robert Harvey: My bad. I accidentally hit "answer" rather than "comment". I'll try to find the proper spot for posting. – supercat Dec 20 '10 at 1:04
-2
votes

Java is slow. So many perl fan bois on slashdot regurgitate(sp???) this, its sad.

-2
votes

That I would be programming in VB forever, I am now c#.

  • Did you believe that you would only need 640K of RAM forever ? – Luc M Jun 10 '09 at 15:56

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