168

I know that in PHP 5.3 instead of using this redundant ternary operator syntax:

startingNum = startingNum ? startingNum : 1

...we can use a shorthand syntax for our ternary operators where applicable:

startingNum = startingNum ?: 1

And I know about the ternary operator in JavaScript:

startingNum = startingNum ? startingNum : 1

...but is there a shorthand?

0

12 Answers 12

257
var startingNumber = startingNumber || 1;

Something like that what you're looking for, where it defaults if undefined?

var foo = bar || 1; // 1
var bar = 2;
foo = bar || 1;     // 2

By the way, this works for a lot of scenarios, including objects:

var foo = bar || {}; // secure an object is assigned when bar is absent
5
  • 4
    Thanks! You nailed it. I'm actually using an object in this instance. :) Commented Jan 16, 2012 at 18:10
  • 32
    For anyone curious, this works because JS's || operator doesn't return true or false, it returns the first 'truthy' value. Say you have val0 and val1 as undefined, and val2 is 2, val3 is 3. val0 || val1 || val2 || val3 will return 2, as it is the first 'truthy' value.
    – Jake T.
    Commented May 2, 2018 at 15:54
  • 5
    Isn't this idiom an anti-pattern? What if you pass 0 or empty string, the 'OR' expression will skip it and use the default value where you actually wanted 0 or empty string. Commented Jun 29, 2018 at 13:25
  • 1
    @Paul indeed, it's a coalesce operation, but mimics what OP requested. The behavior is no different than OP's example. Commented Jun 29, 2018 at 13:30
  • 1
    These comments would be great added to the answer too for some context on what it is called "coalesce operation" and how it works :)
    – A Star
    Commented Oct 22, 2020 at 15:53
37

|| will return the first truthy value it encounters, and can therefore be used as a coalescing operator, similar to C#'s ??

startingNum = startingNum || 1;
2
  • 1
    I like your explanation more than the other ones
    – ajax333221
    Commented Jan 17, 2012 at 18:20
  • 2
    Worth nothing it also returns the last value if none are truthy, which is handy for falling back to a known type, e.g. stringOrUndefinedVar || ''.
    – Walf
    Commented Oct 19, 2022 at 3:40
20

With the addition of ES2020:

New w/Nullish Coalescence: const difficulty = var?.nest[i]?.prop ?? false

Older Operation: const difficulty = var.nest[i].prop ? var.nest[i].prop : false

The question mark before the property will first check if the object even exists (if you aren't sure it will: like in API data) and, if an object is missing, it will return undefined

The ?? checks if the value on the left is null or undefined and, if it is, will return a supplied value on the right.

13

Yes, there is:

var startingNum = startingNum || 1;

In general, expr1 || expr2 works in the following way (as mentioned by the documentation):

Returns expr1 if it can be converted to true; otherwise, returns expr2. Thus, when used with Boolean values, || returns true if either operand is true; if both are false, returns false.

2
  • Isn't it more correct to say if a is truthy vs. if a is evaluated to true?
    – JaredPar
    Commented Jan 16, 2012 at 17:54
  • 3
    @JaredPar: To avoid ambiguity, I have replaced my original detailed explanation with the one from Mozilla Developer Network. It should be less ambiguous.
    – Tadeck
    Commented Jan 16, 2012 at 18:00
8

In most modern browsers you can now use:

startingNum ??= 1;

This will only change startingNum if it is null or undefined.

See: https://developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/Web/JavaScript/Reference/Operators/Logical_nullish_assignment

4

To make a ternary like:

boolean_condition ? true_result : false_result

in javascript, you can do:

(boolean_condition && true_result ) || false_result;

Example:

(true && 'green') || 'red';
=> "green"
(false && 'green') || 'red';
=> "red"
5
  • sooo x = innerWidth * 0.0375 > 24 ? innerWidth * 0.0375 : 24 would become (innerWidth * 0.0375 > 24 && innerWidth * 0.0375) || 24?? is there a shorthand, so that i dont have to repeat innerWidth * 0.0375, other than assigning it to a variable???
    – oldboy
    Commented Mar 24, 2019 at 21:41
  • 1
    In this case, Math.max( innerWidth * 0.0375 , 24 ) would work elegantly. For a more general case, it would be good to create a descriptive method called e.g. 'somethingifiedInnerWidth' which improves readability, rather than create a variable. Though in some cases it would be more readable to have a variable (of that descriptive name), so in future the question 'why is it multiplied by this?' is not raised.
    – xxjjnn
    Commented Mar 26, 2019 at 9:21
  • wow didnt even know u could provide a 2nd argument for Math.max. super elegant solution!!
    – oldboy
    Commented Mar 27, 2019 at 3:48
  • I needed the boolean_condition, so this I need for the ternary. But this does not work: (if coll=='pages' && sort='cat' ) || sort=''; What is wrong?
    – Timo
    Commented Jun 25, 2022 at 13:30
  • 1
    @Timo sort = (coll=='pages' && 'cat') || '' should work. If for some reason you needed those inline assignments you could do (coll=='pages' && (sort='cat')) || (sort='')
    – xxjjnn
    Commented Jun 30, 2022 at 19:54
3
startingNum = startingNum || 1

If you have a condition with null, like

startingNum = startingNum ? startingNum : null

you can use '&&'

startingNum = startingNum && startingNum
2
  • But won't anything && null evaluate to null unless anything is falsy?
    – Petruza
    Commented Apr 2, 2019 at 21:08
  • Yeah, if anything is truthy it evaluates to null. If its falsy, evaluates to the falsy value Commented Apr 4, 2019 at 18:58
2
var startingNum = startingNum || 1;

In this case, you can use the OR operator.

2

The above answers are correct. In JavaScript, the following statement:

startingNum = startingNum ? otherNum : 1

can be expressed as

startingNum = otherNum || 1

Another scenario not covered here is if you want the value to return false when not matched. The JavaScript shorthand for this is:

startingNum = startingNum ? otherNum : 0

But it can be expressed as

startingNum = startingNum && otherNum

Just wanted to cover another scenario in case others were looking for a more generalized answer.

10
  • is there a shorthand for something like this: x = innerWidth * 0.0375 > 24 ? innerWidth * 0.0375 : 24 ???
    – oldboy
    Commented Mar 24, 2019 at 21:39
  • @Anthony No, because innerWidth * 0.0375 > 24 differs from the if true part which is innerWidth * 0.0375. The shorthand can only be used if the expression to be evaluated and the if true are the same value. Same why you wouldn't be able to shorthand x = someBoolean ? 'Heck yea!' : 'No way!'.
    – deedub
    Commented Apr 4, 2019 at 13:10
  • @deedub well, actually, there is a "shorthand" (if youd call it that) which would be Math.max(innerWidth * 0.0375, 24)
    – oldboy
    Commented Apr 9, 2019 at 2:03
  • @Anthony You wouldn't call it that ;) But Math.max works better than a ternary operator in your use case.
    – deedub
    Commented Apr 9, 2019 at 10:16
  • 1
    "startingNum = startingNum ? otherNum : 1 can be expressed as startingNum = otherNum || 1" is wrong. i just tested this
    – oldboy
    Commented Apr 28, 2019 at 4:05
1

Re @Joshu's 'nullish' answer.

The shortcut, or Optional Chaining operator, "?." keeps the dot when used prior to a square bracket for a string (unknown) property, instead of a known property, eg.:

object.propLevel1?.[unknownPropLevel2]

At first usage, for me, it seemed appropriate to drop the dot:

object.propLevel1?[unknownPropLevel2] // WRONG

From mdn: Syntax

obj.val?.prop
obj.val?.[expr]
obj.func?.(args)
0

You can use the accepted answer, but it's not ideal as it breaks when used with bools, if you're defaulting to true, it will always evaluate to true ->

var undefinedVal: boolean;
var trueVal = true;
var falseVal = false;

Angular Template ex:

Value : {{ undefinedVal || true }} -> true
Value : {{ trueVal || true }} -> true
Value : {{ falseVal || true }} -> true?

So use the long way when using bools:

Value : {{ (val != null) ? val : true }}

Also note for typescript and C# (I think), when using ternary with string concatenation it has to be in brackets ->

console.log("Value :" + ((val != null) ? val : true));
0
var startingNum = startingNum || 1;

Can (in this case) be shortened to:

var startingNum =|| 1;

See Logical OR assignment (||=).

See also Nullish coalescing assignment (??=).

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