503

How do I format a floating number to a fixed width with the following requirements:

  1. Leading zero if n < 1
  2. Add trailing decimal zero(s) to fill up fixed width
  3. Truncate decimal digits past fixed width
  4. Align all decimal points

For example:

% formatter something like '{:06}'
numbers = [23.23, 0.123334987, 1, 4.223, 9887.2]

for number in numbers:
    print formatter.format(number)

The output would be like

  23.2300
   0.1233
   1.0000
   4.2230
9887.2000

11 Answers 11

707
numbers = [23.23, 0.1233, 1.0, 4.223, 9887.2]                                                                                                                                                   
                                                                                                                                                                                                
for x in numbers:                                                                                                                                                                               
    print("{:10.4f}".format(x)) 

prints

   23.2300
    0.1233
    1.0000
    4.2230
 9887.2000

The format specifier inside the curly braces follows the Python format string syntax. Specifically, in this case, it consists of the following parts:

  • The empty string before the colon means "take the next provided argument to format()" – in this case the x as the only argument.
  • The 10.4f part after the colon is the format specification.
  • The f denotes fixed-point notation.
  • The 10 is the total width of the field being printed, lefted-padded by spaces.
  • The 4 is the number of digits after the decimal point.
16
  • 13
    So I understand that the 4f represents limiting the decimals to 4 (with trailing zeros), but what does the 10 mean? Does that mean this formatting won't work with integers greater than 9999999999 (ten 9's)? Just curious.
    – hobbes3
    Commented Jan 16, 2012 at 20:17
  • 66
    10.4 means a width of 10 characters and a precision of 4 decimal places.
    – MRAB
    Commented Jan 16, 2012 at 20:27
  • 15
    @hobbes3: 10 is the minimum field width, i.e. the minimum length of the printed string. Numbers are by default right-aligned and padded with spaces -- see the documentation for more details. Commented Jan 16, 2012 at 20:27
  • 9
    For Pythons prior to 2.7: ("%0.4f" % x).rjust(10) Commented Jan 16, 2012 at 21:26
  • 23
    @StevenRumbalski: Or simply "%10.4f" % x. In Python 2.6, you can also use "{0:10.4f}".format(x). Commented Jan 16, 2012 at 21:33
237

It has been a few years since this was answered, but as of Python 3.6 (PEP498) you could use the new f-strings:

numbers = [23.23, 0.123334987, 1, 4.223, 9887.2]

for number in numbers:
    print(f'{number:9.4f}')

Prints:

  23.2300
   0.1233
   1.0000
   4.2230
9887.2000
2
  • 10
    Note that the width also includes dot character. So if you specify 9 to be width, 1 will be used for printing the dot, the other 8 will be for printing digits and spaces.
    – offchan
    Commented Jun 8, 2019 at 20:32
  • A very large number may still result in a string longer than otherwise, so this isn't truly "fixed width" (depending on your interpretation of the term). Commented Dec 14, 2023 at 15:14
50

In python3 the following works:

>>> v=10.4
>>> print('% 6.2f' % v)
  10.40
>>> print('% 12.1f' % v)
        10.4
>>> print('%012.1f' % v)
0000000010.4
1
15

Using f-string literals:

>>> number = 12.34
>>> print(f"{number}")
12.34
>>> print(f"{number:10f}")
 12.340000
>>> print(f"{number:10.4f}")
   12.3400

The 10.4f after the colon : is the format specification, with 10 being the width in characters of the whole number (including spaces), and the second number 4 being the number of decimal places, and the f standing for floating-point number.

It's also possible to use variables instead of hard-coding the width and the number of decimal places:

>>> number = 12.34
>>> width = 10
>>> decimals = 4
>>> print(f"{number:{width}.{decimals}f}")
   12.3400
3
  • Is there any reason why "print(f"{number:5f}")" doesn't work as expected? It outputs 9 symbols ("12.340000"). Looks like 9 is the smallest width? But why? At the same time, adding the number of digits after decimal separator (5.2f) prints a string of 5 symbols as expected.
    – Roman
    Commented Nov 25, 2023 at 22:06
  • 1
    @Roman According to the documentation for the f type, "With no precision given, uses a precision of 6 digits after the decimal point for float,". So print(f"number:99f") will print a number that is at least 99 spaces wide, defaulting to six decimal places, since no precision was given, only width.
    – Flimm
    Commented Nov 26, 2023 at 9:06
  • +1 for variables. I can see the use case when dealing with larger applications that might need a uniform number format that a user can specify from a settings menu.
    – artomason
    Commented May 28 at 20:59
14

You can also left pad with zeros. For example if you want number to have 9 characters length, left padded with zeros use:

print('{:09.3f}'.format(number))

Thus, if number = 4.656, the output is: 00004.656

For your example the output will look like this:

numbers  = [23.2300, 0.1233, 1.0000, 4.2230, 9887.2000]
for x in numbers: 
    print('{:010.4f}'.format(x))

prints:

00023.2300
00000.1233
00001.0000
00004.2230
09887.2000

One example where this may be useful is when you want to properly list filenames in alphabetical order. I noticed in some linux systems, the number is: 1,10,11,..2,20,21,...

Thus if you want to enforce the necessary numeric order in filenames, you need to left pad with the appropriate number of zeros.

12

See Python 3.x format string syntax:

IDLE 3.5.1   
numbers = ['23.23', '.1233', '1', '4.223', '9887.2']

for x in numbers:  
    print('{0: >#016.4f}'. format(float(x)))  

     23.2300
      0.1233
      1.0000
      4.2230
   9887.2000
12

This will print 76.66:

print("Number: ", f"{76.663254: .2f}")
4

In Python 3.

GPA = 2.5
print(" %6.1f " % GPA)

6.1f means after the dots 1 digits show if you print 2 digits after the dots you should only %6.2f such that %6.3f 3 digits print after the point.

1

I needed something similar for arrays. That helped me

some_array_rounded=np.around(some_array, 5)
1

Note that most answers here can return a string longer than the indicated width, if the number is still very large.

If you absolutely need the resulting string to be exactly a certain number of characters, because e.g. you want to display it in a fixed-width font in a table or other context where the number of characters is critical, I don't think there is something built-in for this. A custom function which switches over to scientific notation to save space is possible, i.e. something like the following:

def fpstr(n, width, sign=''):
    n = float(n)
    attempts = []
    def v(s):
        if len(s) != width:
            return
        try:
            float(s)
        except Exception:
            return
        attempts.append(s)

    for w in reversed(range(width)):
        v("{:{}0.0{}f}".format(n, sign, w))

    for w in reversed(range(width)):
        v("{:{}0.0{}g}".format(n, sign, w))

    for w in reversed(range(width)):
        v("{:{}{}g}".format(n, sign, w).rjust(width))

    for w in reversed(range(width)):
        v("{:{}.{}e}".format(n, sign, w).rjust(width))

    if not attempts:
        return "#" * width

    best_attempt = attempts[0]
    for attempt in attempts[1:]:
        if abs(n - float(attempt)) < abs(n - float(best_attempt)):
            best_attempt = attempt
    return best_attempt

(This is a draft so leaving this as a community wiki to allow future improvement.)

-1

I tried all the options like

  1. pd.options.display.float_format = '{:.4f}'.format
  2. pd.set_option('display.float_format', str)
  3. pd.set_option('display.float_format', lambda x: f'%.{len(str(x%1))-2}f' % x)
  4. pd.set_option('display.float_format', lambda x: '%.3f' % x)

but nothing worked for me.

so while assigning the variable/value (var1) to a variable (say num1) I used round(val,5) like

num1 = round(var1,5)

This is a crude method as you have to use this round function in each assignment. But this ensures you control on how it happens and get what you want.

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service and acknowledge you have read our privacy policy.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.