239

How do I format a floating number to a fixed width with the following requirements:

  1. Leading zero if n < 1
  2. Add trailing decimal zero(s) to fill up fixed width
  3. Truncate decimal digits past fixed width
  4. Align all decimal points

For example:

% formatter something like '{:06}'
numbers = [23.23, 0.123334987, 1, 4.223, 9887.2]

for number in numbers:
    print formatter.format(number)

The output would be like

  23.2300
   0.1233
   1.0000
   4.2230
9887.2000
385
for x in numbers:
    print "{:10.4f}".format(x)

prints

   23.2300
    0.1233
    1.0000
    4.2230
 9887.2000

The format specifier inside the curly braces follows the Python format string syntax. Specifically, in this case, it consists of the following parts:

  • The empty string before the colon means "take the next provided argument to format()" – in this case the x as the only argument.
  • The 10.4f part after the colon is the format specification.
  • The f denotes fixed-point notation.
  • The 10 is the total width of the field being printed, lefted-padded by spaces.
  • The 4 is the number of digits after the decimal point.
  • 11
    So I understand that the 4f represents limiting the decimals to 4 (with trailing zeros), but what does the 10 mean? Does that mean this formatting won't work with integers greater than 9999999999 (ten 9's)? Just curious. – hobbes3 Jan 16 '12 at 20:17
  • 44
    10.4 means a width of 10 characters and a precision of 4 decimal places. – MRAB Jan 16 '12 at 20:27
  • 12
    @hobbes3: 10 is the minimum field width, i.e. the minimum length of the printed string. Numbers are by default right-aligned and padded with spaces -- see the documentation for more details. – Sven Marnach Jan 16 '12 at 20:27
  • 9
    For Pythons prior to 2.7: ("%0.4f" % x).rjust(10) – Steven Rumbalski Jan 16 '12 at 21:26
  • 22
    @StevenRumbalski: Or simply "%10.4f" % x. In Python 2.6, you can also use "{0:10.4f}".format(x). – Sven Marnach Jan 16 '12 at 21:33
30

In python3 the following works:

>>> v=10.4
>>> print('% 6.2f' % v)
  10.40
>>> print('% 12.1f' % v)
        10.4
>>> print('%012.1f' % v)
0000000010.4
  • 6
    This works in both Python 2 and 3. – Bernard Ojengwa Feb 27 '16 at 17:34
22

It has been a few years since this was answered, but as of Python 3.6 (PEP498) you could use the new f-strings:

numbers = [23.23, 0.123334987, 1, 4.223, 9887.2]

for number in numbers:
    print(f'{number:9.4f}')

Prints:

  23.2300
   0.1233
   1.0000
   4.2230
9887.2000
7

See Python 3.x format string syntax:

IDLE 3.5.1   
numbers = ['23.23', '.1233', '1', '4.223', '9887.2']

for x in numbers:  
    print('{0: >#016.4f}'. format(float(x)))  

     23.2300
      0.1233
      1.0000
      4.2230
   9887.2000
-1

In Python 3.

GPA = 2.5
print(" %6.1f " % GPA)

6.1f means after the dots 1 digits show if you print 2 digits after the dots you should only %6.2f such that %6.3f 3 digits print after the point.

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