8

I am looking for a way to enumerate all possible two-member group constellations for n members.

E.g., for n = 4 members the following 3 unique group constellations are possible (please note that neither the order of the members within a group nor the group order is of importance):

((1,2), (3,4))
((1,3), (2,4))
((1,4), (2,3))

E.g., for n = 6 members the 15 unique constellations are possible:

((1,2), (3,4), (5,6))
((1,2), (5,4), (3,6))
((1,2), (6,4), (5,3))
((1,3), (2,4), (5,6))
((1,3), (2,6), (5,4))
((1,3), (2,5), (4,6))
((1,4), (3,2), (5,6))
((1,4), (3,5), (2,6))
((1,4), (3,6), (5,2))
((1,5), (3,4), (2,6))
((1,5), (3,2), (4,6))
((1,5), (3,6), (2,4))
((1,6), (3,4), (5,2))
((1,6), (3,5), (2,4))
((1,6), (3,2), (5,4))

For n members the number of unique groups can be calculated as

choose(n,2)*choose(n-2,2)*...*choose(2,2)/factorial(n/2),

where choose(n,k) is the binomial coef.

For n = 4 we have

choose(4,2)/factorial(4/2) = 3 

possible two-member group constellations. For n = 6 it is

choose(6,2)*choose(4,2)/factorial(6/2) = 15. 

An enumaration of the groups by hand is not feasible for more than n = 6 members. Is there an easy way to get a list/dataframe with all possible group constellations?

5
  • I'm not sure of exactly how to do it, but look at itertools: docs.python.org/library/itertools.html
    – robert
    Jan 16, 2012 at 21:32
  • 2
    I thought I understood it but now I realize I don't. Your list of 15 includes both ((3,2), (1,4), (5,6)) and ((1,4), (3,2), (5,6)), as well as several other pairs which my code considered equivalent. What am I missing?
    – DSM
    Jan 16, 2012 at 22:18
  • Yeah, it looks like the list in the OP is incorrect. Still, there IS a unique list of fifteen satisfying the conditions given; see my answer.
    – tzaman
    Jan 16, 2012 at 23:07
  • -2 for not posting an answer that could have been easily checked. Edited your "answer".
    – IRTFM
    Jan 16, 2012 at 23:19
  • @DSM Yeah, I made a mistake enumerating the n = 6 example. Sorry. However, as I have written above enumerating by hand is quite cumbersome. That's why I asked the question. Thank you nevertheless.
    – phx
    Jan 17, 2012 at 7:32

4 Answers 4

4

This looks like it works:

from itertools import combinations, islice

def cons(nums):
    if len(nums)%2 or len(nums)<2:
        raise ValueError
    if len(nums) == 2:
        yield (nums,)
        return
    for c in islice(combinations(nums, 2), len(nums)-1):
        for sub in cons(tuple(set(nums) - set(c))):
            yield ((c,) + sub)

def constellations(n):
    return cons(range(1, n+1))

for c in constellations(6):
    print c

Output:

((1, 2), (3, 4), (5, 6))
((1, 2), (3, 5), (4, 6))
((1, 2), (3, 6), (4, 5))
((1, 3), (2, 4), (5, 6))
((1, 3), (2, 5), (4, 6))
((1, 3), (2, 6), (4, 5))
((1, 4), (2, 3), (5, 6))
((1, 4), (2, 5), (3, 6))
((1, 4), (2, 6), (3, 5))
((1, 5), (2, 3), (4, 6))
((1, 5), (2, 4), (3, 6))
((1, 5), (2, 6), (3, 4))
((1, 6), (2, 3), (4, 5))
((1, 6), (2, 4), (3, 5))
((1, 6), (2, 5), (3, 4))

Produces 105 entries for constellations(8) which checks out according to the formula.
Essentially, what I'm doing is grabbing just the combinations of the first element with each other element, and then passing the remainder into the recursion -- this ensures no repeated groups.

1
  • Very efficient - thank you very much. This solution is very helpful since it allows us to enumerate constellations for more than n = 30 members.
    – phx
    Jan 17, 2012 at 9:23
4

The R package partitions was written to answer questions like yours, which (in mathematical terms) is about enumerating all possible partitions of a set of six elements into three equivalence classes of two elements each.

The package provides two functions -- setparts() and listParts() -- that will enumerate all of the partitions. The functions differ solely in the format in which they return those results.

Here, I show the output of the listParts() function, mainly because the printed format that it returns is closer to what you included in the original question:

    library(partitions)
    P <- listParts(c(2,2,2)) 
    N <- sapply(P, print)
    # [1] (1,6)(2,5)(3,4)
    # [1] (1,6)(2,4)(3,5)
    # [1] (1,6)(2,3)(4,5)
    # [1] (1,2)(3,6)(4,5)
    # [1] (1,2)(3,5)(4,6)
    # [1] (1,2)(3,4)(5,6)
    # [1] (1,3)(2,6)(4,5)
    # [1] (1,3)(2,4)(5,6)
    # [1] (1,3)(2,5)(4,6)
    # [1] (1,4)(2,6)(3,5)
    # [1] (1,4)(2,5)(3,6)
    # [1] (1,4)(2,3)(5,6)
    # [1] (1,5)(2,6)(3,4)
    # [1] (1,5)(2,4)(3,6)
    # [1] (1,5)(2,3)(4,6)
5
  • Thanks, this is a very elegant solution. Unfortunately, for more than n = 8 members R is not able to enumerate all group constellations.
    – phx
    Jan 17, 2012 at 9:17
  • Is the package called partitions? I can't see partition on CRAN but partitions is there. Jan 17, 2012 at 9:30
  • @phx Can you explain what you mean by more than n = 8? I did P <- listParts(c(2,2,2,2,2)) (i.e. n= 10) and it worked giving 945 partitions. Jan 17, 2012 at 9:32
  • @GavinSimpson: Well it seems that it heavily depends on the machine where R is running. My computer at home gave me some kind of error message with n >= 8. However, my computer at work can handle n >= 8. Since memory allocation problems in R are well known, I would always use the Python code for bigger ns. Especially, because it is much faster than R. -- Anyhow, the R code is really beautiful and elegant ;).
    – phx
    Jan 17, 2012 at 11:28
  • @phx I get an error at n = 30, but then again, I'm not sure what you are going to do with all 6.190283e+15 "constellations" even if you could generate them. This is nothing to do with memory allocation but you are getting towards the limits of how long a vector can be as R only uses 32-bit indices. The error is coming from the function though, not R, so the package authors are setting limits on how big the vectors are it will work with. Jan 17, 2012 at 12:26
1

If you want to enumerate all partitions of 1:n into pairs, you can just do it recursively. Here is an R solution.

f <- function(x) {
  # We can only partition the set into pairs 
  # if it has an even number of elements
  stopifnot( length(x) %% 2 == 0 )
  stopifnot( length(x) > 0 )
  # To avoid double counting, sort the array, 
  # and put the first element in the first pair
  x <- sort(x)
  # The first pair contains the first element 
  # and another element: n - 1 possibilities
  first_pairs <- lapply( x[-1], function(u) c(x[1],u) )
  if( length(x) == 2 ) { return( list( first_pairs ) ) }
  # Progressively build the result, by considering 
  # those pairs one at a time
  result <- list()
  for( first_pair in first_pairs ) {
    y <- setdiff( x, first_pair )
    rest <- f(y)
    # Call the function recursively: 
    # a partition of 1:n that starts with (1,2)
    # is just (1,2) followed by a partition of 3:n.
    result <- append( 
      result, 
      # This is the tricky bit: 
      # correctly use append/c/list to build the list.
      lapply( rest, function (u) { append( list( first_pair ), u ) } )  
    )
  }
  result
}

# The result is a list of lists of 2-element vectors: print it in a more readable way.
result <- f(1:6)
result <- lapply( result, function (u) unlist(lapply( u, function (v) paste( "(", paste(v,collapse=","), ")", sep="" ))))
result <- unlist( lapply( result, function (u) paste( u, collapse=", " ) ) )
0
1

I came up with:

from itertools import combinations

def have_common(a, b):
    """Test if two iterables have a common item."""
    for i in a:
        if i in b:
            return True
    return False

def have_same(iterable):
    """Test if a nested iterable like ((1, 2), (3, 4), (5, 6)) 
    present the same number more then once.

    """
    memory = []
    for duo in iterable:
        if have_common(memory, duo):
            return True
        else:
            memory.extend(duo)
    return False

def constellation(num):
    """Loops on all the combinations of 2 combinations and then yields them
    if they don't have numbers in common.

    """
    lst = (i for i in combinations(range(1, num+1), 2))
    for cost in combinations(lst, int(num/2)):
        if not have_same(cost):
            yield cost

Running:

for i in constellation(6):
    print(i)

I got:

((1, 2), (3, 4), (5, 6))
((1, 2), (3, 5), (4, 6))
((1, 2), (3, 6), (4, 5))
((1, 3), (2, 4), (5, 6))
((1, 3), (2, 5), (4, 6))
((1, 3), (2, 6), (4, 5))
((1, 4), (2, 3), (5, 6))
((1, 4), (2, 5), (3, 6))
((1, 4), (2, 6), (3, 5))
((1, 5), (2, 3), (4, 6))
((1, 5), (2, 4), (3, 6))
((1, 5), (2, 6), (3, 4))
((1, 6), (2, 3), (4, 5))
((1, 6), (2, 4), (3, 5))
((1, 6), (2, 5), (3, 4))

Performance: This can still be improved with better algorithms for have_same and have_common.

But I did a little timing anyway with timit and I got:

constellation(4): 13.54 usec/pass
constellation(6): 118.48 usec/pass
constellation(8): 3222.14 usec/pass
1
  • Thank you very much. Works well.
    – phx
    Jan 17, 2012 at 9:25

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