80

By default, it seems that logcat will truncate any log message that it considers to be "too long". This happens both inside of Eclipse and when running logcat on the command line using adb -d logcat, and is truncating some important debugging messages.

Is there any way to increase the maximum string length supported by logcat to get it to stop truncating the debug information? The official documentation implies that there may not be, but maybe logcat supports some additional options not mentioned there?

11 Answers 11

33

There is a fixed size buffer in logcat for binary logs (/dev/log/events) and this limit is 1024 bytes. For the non-binary logs there is also a limit:

#define LOGGER_ENTRY_MAX_LEN        (4*1024)
#define LOGGER_ENTRY_MAX_PAYLOAD (LOGGER_ENTRY_MAX_LEN - sizeof(struct logger_entry))

So the real message size for both binary and non-binary logs is ~4076 bytes. The kernel logger interface imposes this LOGGER_ENTRY_MAX_PAYLOAD limit.

The liblog sources (used by logcat) also say:

  • The message may have been truncated by the kernel log driver.

I would recommend you the nxlog tool which does not use the logcat binary, but due to the limitations in the kernel I doubt that it will solve your problem. Nevertheless, it might be worth a try. (disclaimer: I'm the author.)

  • 6
    Where do I find this? Is it in the "logcat" code? So, would I have to compile my own modified logcat? – d4Rk Jul 2 '15 at 15:38
  • 1
    What is binary / non-binary log? – fobbymaster Nov 9 '16 at 18:17
  • 1
    Due to metadata fields being added, LOGGER_ENTRY_MAX_PAYLOAD has been reduced from 4076 to 4068 in more recent versions of Android (see here). – mhsmith Feb 14 '18 at 16:10
82

Ok, interesting. I was disappointed to see that the answer was "you can't really expand it". My initial thought was to break it up so I could view the whole thing, so here I share with you how I do just that (not that it's anything fancy nor is it near efficient, but it gets the job done in a pinch):

if (sb.length() > 4000) {
    Log.v(TAG, "sb.length = " + sb.length());
    int chunkCount = sb.length() / 4000;     // integer division
    for (int i = 0; i <= chunkCount; i++) {
        int max = 4000 * (i + 1);
        if (max >= sb.length()) {
            Log.v(TAG, "chunk " + i + " of " + chunkCount + ":" + sb.substring(4000 * i));
        } else {
            Log.v(TAG, "chunk " + i + " of " + chunkCount + ":" + sb.substring(4000 * i, max));
        }
    }
} else {
    Log.v(TAG, sb.toString());
}

Edited to show the last string!

  • thanks for that! I was also going to chunk up long data – Someone Somewhere Jun 29 '12 at 21:47
  • No problem! Hope it helped you out – Travis Jul 3 '12 at 17:50
  • 2
    You lost last string in: int chunkCount = sb.length() / 4000; Use int chunkCount = sb.length() / 4000; if (chunkCount * 4000 < sb.length()) chunkCount++; – Timur Gilfanov Feb 20 '13 at 16:55
  • 2
    add else { Log.v(TAG, sb); } to also print the log when the message is <= 4000 chars long – Bojan Radivojevic Bomber Apr 26 '14 at 21:45
  • 4
    This answer is wrong for non-ASCII characters. logcat supports UTF8 and the limit is 4k bytes, not characters. – miguel Apr 14 '15 at 23:46
42

Break it up in several pieces recursively.

public static void largeLog(String tag, String content) {
   if (content.length() > 4000) {
       Log.d(tag, content.substring(0, 4000));
       largeLog(tag, content.substring(4000));
   } else {
       Log.d(tag, content);
   }
}
  • 3
    This is by far the cleanest solution and the first time I've actually used recursion in production code. – Aggressor Jul 25 '16 at 22:54
  • 1
    @Aggressor why do you need to log 4000+ long messages in production? – TWiStErRob Sep 10 '16 at 9:24
  • @TWiStErRob Very big objects that need to be stringified. E.g. an array with thousands of locations. – Aggressor Sep 10 '16 at 15:49
  • @Aggressor the question was aimed at the production part. Why do you need to log those thousands of lines on every single user's device? – TWiStErRob Sep 10 '16 at 16:11
  • 1
    My use case is to output a big json stuff. Files are simply a pain. – Marcel Falliere Mar 7 '17 at 16:40
10
for( String line : logMesg.split("\n") ) {
    Log.d( TAG, line );
}
4

Here is the code I use--it truncates the lines at the 4000 limit while also breaking the line at new lines rather than in the middles of the line. Makes for an easier to read log file.

Usage:

Logger.debugEntire("....");

Implementation:

package ...;

import android.util.Log;

import java.util.Arrays;

public class Logger {

    private static final String LOG_TAG = "MyRockingApp";

    /** @see <a href="http://stackoverflow.com/a/8899735" /> */
    private static final int ENTRY_MAX_LEN = 4000;

    /**
     * @param args If the last argument is an exception than it prints out the stack trace, and there should be no {}
     *             or %s placeholder for it.
     */
    public static void d(String message, Object... args) {
        log(Log.DEBUG, false, message, args);
    }

    /**
     * Display the entire message, showing multiple lines if there are over 4000 characters rather than truncating it.
     */
    public static void debugEntire(String message, Object... args) {
        log(Log.DEBUG, true, message, args);
    }

    public static void i(String message, Object... args) {
        log(Log.INFO, false, message, args);
    }

    public static void w(String message, Object... args) {
        log(Log.WARN, false, message, args);
    }

    public static void e(String message, Object... args) {
        log(Log.ERROR, false, message, args);
    }

    private static void log(int priority, boolean ignoreLimit, String message, Object... args) {
        String print;
        if (args != null && args.length > 0 && args[args.length-1] instanceof Throwable) {
            Object[] truncated = Arrays.copyOf(args, args.length -1);
            Throwable ex = (Throwable) args[args.length-1];
            print = formatMessage(message, truncated) + '\n' + android.util.Log.getStackTraceString(ex);
        } else {
            print = formatMessage(message, args);
        }
        if (ignoreLimit) {
            while (!print.isEmpty()) {
                int lastNewLine = print.lastIndexOf('\n', ENTRY_MAX_LEN);
                int nextEnd = lastNewLine != -1 ? lastNewLine : Math.min(ENTRY_MAX_LEN, print.length());
                String next = print.substring(0, nextEnd /*exclusive*/);
                android.util.Log.println(priority, LOG_TAG, next);
                if (lastNewLine != -1) {
                    // Don't print out the \n twice.
                    print = print.substring(nextEnd+1);
                } else {
                    print = print.substring(nextEnd);
                }
            }
        } else {
            android.util.Log.println(priority, LOG_TAG, print);
        }
    }

    private static String formatMessage(String message, Object... args) {
        String formatted;
        try {
            /*
             * {} is used by SLF4J so keep it compatible with that as it's easy to forget to use %s when you are
             * switching back and forth between server and client code.
             */
            formatted = String.format(message.replaceAll("\\{\\}", "%s"), args);
        } catch (Exception ex) {
            formatted = message + Arrays.toString(args);
        }
        return formatted;
    }
}
3

The code below is a refinement of what was posted by Mark Buikema. It breaks the string at new lines. Useful for logging long JSON strings.

  public static void dLong(String theMsg)
  {
    final int MAX_INDEX = 4000;
    final int MIN_INDEX = 3000;

    // String to be logged is longer than the max...
    if (theMsg.length() > MAX_INDEX)
    {
      String theSubstring = theMsg.substring(0, MAX_INDEX);
      int    theIndex = MAX_INDEX;

      // Try to find a substring break at a line end.
      theIndex = theSubstring.lastIndexOf('\n');
      if (theIndex >= MIN_INDEX)
      {
        theSubstring = theSubstring.substring(0, theIndex);
      }
      else
      {
        theIndex = MAX_INDEX;
      }

      // Log the substring.
      Log.d(APP_LOG_TAG, theSubstring);

      // Recursively log the remainder.
      dLong(theMsg.substring(theIndex));
    }

    // String to be logged is shorter than the max...
    else
    {
      Log.d(APP_LOG_TAG, theMsg);
    }
  }
2

us this paging logic

    /*
     * StringBuffer sb - long text which want to show in multiple lines 
     * int lenth - lenth of line need
     */

public static void showInPage(StringBuffer sb, int lenth) {
    System.out.println("sb.length = " + sb.length());
    if (sb.length() > lenth) {

        int chunkCount = sb.length() / lenth; // integer division
        if ((chunkCount % lenth) > 1)
            chunkCount++;
        for (int i = 0; i < chunkCount; i++) {
            int max = lenth * (i + 1);
            if (max >= sb.length()) {
                System.out.println("");
                System.out.println("chunk " + i + " of " + chunkCount + ":"
                        + sb.substring(lenth * i));
            } else {
                System.out.println("");
                System.out.println("chunk " + i + " of " + chunkCount + ":"
                        + sb.substring(lenth * i, max));
            }
        }
    }

}
1

providing my own take on Travis's solution,

void d(String msg) {
  println(Log.DEBUG, msg);
}

private void println(int priority, String msg) {
    int l = msg.length();
    int c = Log.println(priority, TAG, msg);
    if (c < l) {
        return c + println(priority, TAG, msg.substring(c+1));
    } else {
        return c;
    }
}

take advantage of the fact that Log.println() returns the number of bytes written to avoid hardcoding "4000". then, recursively call yourself on the part of the message that couldn't be logged until there's nothing left.

  • Unfortunately, println returns # of bytes written, and characters != bytes. – gnuf May 29 '13 at 18:39
  • 1
    well, it works. i assume because i'm only logging ascii text. – Jeffrey Blattman May 29 '13 at 20:21
1

If your log is very long (eg. logging entire dump of your database for debugging reasons etc.) it may happen that logcat prevents excessive logging. To work around this you can add a timeout evry x milliseconds.

/**
 * Used for very long messages, splits it into equal chunks and logs each individual to
 * work around the logcat max message length. Will log with {@link Log#d(String, String)}.
 *
 * @param tag     used in for logcat
 * @param message long message to log
 */
public static void longLogDebug(final String tag, @NonNull String message) {
    int i = 0;

    final int maxLogLength = 1000;
    while (message.length() > maxLogLength) {
        Log.d(tag, message.substring(0, maxLogLength));
        message = message.substring(maxLogLength);
        i++;

        if (i % 100 == 0) {
            StrictMode.noteSlowCall("wait to flush logcat");
            SystemClock.sleep(32);
        }
    }
    Log.d(tag, message);
}

Beware, only use this for debugging purpose as it may halts blocks main thread.

0

I dont know any option to increase the length of logcat , but we can find the different logs like main log , event log etc..The main log usually contains everything its length goes upto 4Mb.. So you may able to get what you lost in log terminal. Path is: \data\logger.

0
int i = 3000;
while (sb.length() > i) {
    Log.e(TAG, "Substring: "+ sb.substring(0, i));
    sb = sb.substring(i);
}
Log.e(TAG, "Substring: "+ sb);

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