Can I set any variable in CSS like I want my div height to always be half of width my div scales with the screen size width for div is in percent

<div class="ss"></div>

CSS:

.ss {
    width:30%;
    height: half of the width;
}

This 30% width scales with screen resolution

You can do it with the help of padding on a parent item, because relative padding (even height-wise) is based on the width of the parent element.

CSS:

.imageContainer {
    position: relative;
    width: 25%;
    padding-bottom: 25%;
    float: left;
    height: 0;
}

img {
    width: 100%;
    height: 100%;
    position: absolute;
    left: 0;
}

For details, see this article on the subject http://wemadeyoulook.at/en/blog/proportional-scaling-responsive-boxes-using-just-css/

  • Works very well! I tried it out on a div with a child node and yasssss. – rardoz Mar 4 '16 at 22:22
  • 1
    Clever. padding-bottom to create space for the img... – Michal Stefanow May 16 '16 at 15:03
  • This CSS has all kinds of weird things here and there. Nevertheless, it works. – Ghasan Al-Sakkaf Sep 15 '16 at 9:53
  • 1
    OMG Thank you!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! – user3808307 Oct 7 '17 at 2:56
  • Genius, thanks! – Benjamin Sep 7 at 9:57

Another great way to accomplish this is to use a transparent image with a set aspect ratio. Then set the width of the image to 100% and the height to auto. That unfortunately will push down the original content of the container. So you need to wrap the original content in another div and position it absolutely to the top of the parent div.

<div class="parent">
   <img class="aspect-ratio" src="images/aspect-ratio.png" />
   <div class="content">Content</div>
</div>

CSS

.parent {
  position: relative;
}
.aspect-ratio {
  width: 100%;
  height: auto;
}
.content {
  position: absolute;
  width: 100%;
  top: 0; left: 0;
}
  • 1
    This only worked for me by also setting height: 100%; in .content. Thanks for the tip though. I like this method better than padding. – Ture Flase Jul 20 '16 at 2:36
  • Question is "using CSS", better avoiding adding new elements to HTML – Diego Betto Jun 21 '17 at 14:16

If you want vertical sizing proportional to a width set in pixels on an enclosing div, I believe you need an extra element, like so:

#html

<div class="ptest">
    <div class="ptest-wrap">
        <div class="ptest-inner">
            Put content here
        </div>
    </div>
</div>

#css
.ptest {
  width: 200px;
  position: relative;
}

.ptest-wrap {
    padding-top: 60%;
}
.ptest-inner {
    position: absolute;
    top: 0;
    left: 0;
    right: 0;
    bottom: 0;
    background: #333;
}

Here's the 2 div solution that doesn't work. Note the 60% vertical padding is proportional to the window width, not the div.ptest width:

http://jsfiddle.net/d85FM/

Here's the example with the code above, which does work:

http://jsfiddle.net/mmq29/

For anyone looking for a scalable solution: I wrote a small helper utility in SASS to generate responsive proportional rectangles for different breakpoints. Take a look at SASS Proportions

Hope it helps anybody!

This answer is much the same as others except I prefer not to use as many class names. But that's just personal preference. You could argue that using class names on each div is more transparent as declares up front the purpose of the nested divs.

<div id="MyDiv" class="proportional">
  <div>
    <div>
      <p>Content</p>
    </div>
  </div>
</div>

Here's the generic CSS:

.proportional { position:relative; }
.proportional > div > div { position:absolute; top:0px; bottom:0px; left:0px; right:0px; }

Then target the first inner div to set width and height (padding-top):

#MyDiv > div { width:200px; padding-top:50%; }

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