5

A perfect power is a number N where A^B = N (A >= 1 , B >= 2)

This is my code. I'm trying to find how many of these numbers exist between 1 and the top limit I select.

    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        int PPwr_Count = 1; //number 1 is included by default.
        int Top_Limit = 1000000; //Can be any number up to 10^9
        for (int Number = 2; Number <= Top_Limit; Number++)
        {
            int myLog = (int)Math.Floor(Math.Log(Number, 2) + 1);
            for (int i = 2; i <= myLog; i++) 
            {
                //As a Math rule I only need to check below Base 2 Log of number
                int x = Convert.ToInt32(Math.Pow(Number, 1.0 / i));
                 if (Number == Math.Pow(x, i))
                 {
                     PPwr_Count++;
                     break;
                 }
                 else continue;
            }
        }
     } 

It's currently working. Sadly it becomes quite slow after around 1,000,000 checks. Anyhow to improve this algorithm's speed?

4
  • possible duplicate of Perfect power of two between two numbers --- See this for an example of a better algorithm. It is specific to 2 but can easily be adapted.
    – Yuck
    Jan 17, 2012 at 19:27
  • @Yuck I'm not sure how those solutions can be easily adapted. All the solutions in that question use binary logic, and they only work because the question asked specifically about powers of 2. Binary operations alone won't work here where the answer could be a power of, say, 3.
    – ean5533
    Jan 17, 2012 at 19:30
  • 1
    Assuming that A and B are integers, you may want to consider searching over B and A rather than searching over N, as there will be far fewer numbers to consider. The tricky boundary case here is numbers that have more than one representation (4^2 = 2^4, for instance), so you'll need to make some additional exclusions rather than just checking that A^B <= N. Consider that you actually are finding the values of A that would be redundant as part of searching, so perhaps there is a way you can use that information to exclude searching those values.
    – Dan Bryant
    Jan 17, 2012 at 19:37
  • It's not only powers of 2, it's any power that fits A^B = N (A >= 1 , B >= 2) Jan 17, 2012 at 19:46

6 Answers 6

8

Math.Log is expensive, Math.Pow is expensive, doubles are expensive. You know what isn't expensive? Multiplying integers.

Some theorycrafting: if A^B == n and n<10^9 and B>=2 than max A is close to 5*10^4. So lets have a set of perfect powers. Iterate from 2 while i*i<=max_n, if i is not in set, add i*i, i*i*i, and so on while its less then max_n. If A=C^D, then A^B = C^(B*D), and is already in set.

static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        int PPwr_Count = 1; //number 1 is included by default.
        int Top_Limit = 1000000000; //Can be any number up to 10^9
        HashSet<int> hs = new HashSet<int>();

        for (int A = 2; A * A <= Top_Limit; ++A)
        {
            if (!hs.Contains(A))
            {
                //We use long because of possible overflow
                long t = A*A;
                while (t <= Top_Limit)
                {
                    hs.Add((int)t);
                    t *= A;
                    PPwr_Count++;
                }
            }
        }
        Console.WriteLine(PPwr_Count);
    }

EDIT: This runs less then half a second on debug on my laptop.

1
3

Move Math.Log(Number, 2) + 1 out of the for loop.

int myLog = (int)Math.Floor(Math.Log(Number, 2) + 1);
for (int i = 2; i <= myLog; i++) 
2
  • Good call, I didn't even notice that. You should explain in your answer how Math.Log(Number, 2) + 1 is getting recalculated on every iteration.
    – ean5533
    Jan 17, 2012 at 19:33
  • Thanks. Just edited my code. It improved the time but still quite slow. I believe my implementation should be changed. Jan 17, 2012 at 19:57
2

It would be easier to search in the space of A and B rather than N. A from [2,...,sqrt(N)], B from [List of prime numbers].

2

I would be inclined to use a completely different approach.

First, make an iterator that enumerates all the prime numbers up to the square root of the maximum size. So 2, 3, 5, 7, 11...

UPDATE: NO WAIT THAT DOESN'T WORK. That for example does not give 36 as a perfect power.

Let me revise.

Make an iterator that enumerates all the numbers from 2 up to the square root of the maximum size.

Next, make an iterator that enumerates all the perfect powers of a particular given number up to the maximum size. That is 22, 23, 24, ...

Now, combine the two iterators with a select-many query, so that you are generating: 22, 23, 24, ... 32, 33, 34, ..., 42, 43, 44, ...

Build a hash set out of the resulting query, to form the union of all the perfect powers less than the maximum size of all the numbers up to the square root of the maximum size.

The size of the resulting hash set is the number you seek.

3
  • I like your idea, thanks. But I don't understand the part about "iterator that enumerates all the perfect powers of a given number up to the maximum size". Isn't it what I'm actually trying to do? Would you mind explaining it a little bit more? Thanks again. Jan 17, 2012 at 20:05
  • @JeanCarlosSuárezMarranzini: You are right, it was not very clear. I'll clarify it. Jan 17, 2012 at 20:25
  • You dont need As to be primes, just having Bs as primes is good enough (that is my solution described above).
    – ElKamina
    Jan 17, 2012 at 21:20
1

Another option is instead of looping through all the numbers and checking to see if they are a power, you could do the opposite: generate all perfect powers.

So if you start with base 2, calculate 2^1, 2^2, etc. Then calculate 3^1, 3^2, 3^3, etc. and so on. You'd also probably want to store each result in a HashSet so that double are eliminated. At the end, counting is as simple as hash.Count

I'm not sure how the performance of this stacks up to your code (it's definitely less space efficient), but it's another angle just might work.

1
  • Hah, we had the same idea at the same time. Note that you want to calculate 2^2, 2^3 and so on, not starting from 2^1. If you start with first powers then every number is a perfect power. Jan 17, 2012 at 19:52
1

I would try working the algorithm from the other direction..

Start with a = 2 and b = 2 and go through each b until a ^ b > max_limit

The trick to this method is to only test values of a that are prime numbers

The trick to this method is not test values of a that are perfect powers (eg don't test 4, 8, 9, etc)

1
  • I tried it but sometimes the number gets too high to be contained. Maybe I should look froward to solve it. Jan 17, 2012 at 20:04

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