137

I am new to Dapper Micro ORM. So far i am able to use it for simple ORM related stuffs but i am not able to map the database column names with the class properties. For example:

I have the database table as follows:

Table Name: Person
person_id  int
first_name varchar(50)
last_name  varchar(50)

and i have the class called Person

public class Person 
{
    public int PersonId { get; set; }
    public string FirstName { get; set; }
    public string LastName { get; set; }
}

Please note that my column names in the table are different from the property name of the class to which i am trying to map the data which i got from the query result.

var sql = @"select top 1 PersonId,FirstName,LastName from Person";
using (var conn = ConnectionFactory.GetConnection())
{
    var person = conn.Query<Person>(sql).ToList();
    return person;
}

The above code won't work as column names won't match with object's (Person) properties. In this scenario, is there anything i can do in Dapper to manually map (e.g person_id => PersonId) the column names with object properties?

Any clue or help would be highly appreciated.

14 Answers 14

60

This works fine:

var sql = @"select top 1 person_id PersonId, first_name FirstName, last_name LastName from Person";
using (var conn = ConnectionFactory.GetConnection())
{
    var person = conn.Query<Person>(sql).ToList();
    return person;
}

Dapper has no facility that allows you to specify a Column Attribute, I am not against adding support for it, providing we do not pull in the dependency.

  • @Sam Saffron is there any way I can specify the table alias. I have a class named Country but in the db the table has very convoluted name due to archic naming conventions. – TheVillageIdiot Aug 7 '12 at 14:55
  • 49
    Column Attribue would be handy for mapping stored procedure results. – Ronnie Overby Nov 2 '12 at 17:48
  • 2
    Column attributes would also be useful for more easily facilitating tight physical and/or semantic coupling between your domain and the tool implementation details you're using to materialize your entities. Therefore, don't add support for this!!!! :) – Derek Greer Jun 26 '14 at 15:43
164

Dapper now supports custom column to property mappers. It does so through the ITypeMap interface. A CustomPropertyTypeMap class is provided by Dapper that can do most of this work. For example:

Dapper.SqlMapper.SetTypeMap(
    typeof(TModel),
    new CustomPropertyTypeMap(
        typeof(TModel),
        (type, columnName) =>
            type.GetProperties().FirstOrDefault(prop =>
                prop.GetCustomAttributes(false)
                    .OfType<ColumnAttribute>()
                    .Any(attr => attr.Name == columnName))));

And the model:

public class TModel {
    [Column(Name="my_property")]
    public int MyProperty { get; set; }
}

It's important to note that the implementation of CustomPropertyTypeMap requires that the attribute exist and match one of the column names or the property won't be mapped. The DefaultTypeMap class provides the standard functionality and can be leveraged to change this behavior:

public class FallbackTypeMapper : SqlMapper.ITypeMap
{
    private readonly IEnumerable<SqlMapper.ITypeMap> _mappers;

    public FallbackTypeMapper(IEnumerable<SqlMapper.ITypeMap> mappers)
    {
        _mappers = mappers;
    }

    public SqlMapper.IMemberMap GetMember(string columnName)
    {
        foreach (var mapper in _mappers)
        {
            try
            {
                var result = mapper.GetMember(columnName);
                if (result != null)
                {
                    return result;
                }
            }
            catch (NotImplementedException nix)
            {
            // the CustomPropertyTypeMap only supports a no-args
            // constructor and throws a not implemented exception.
            // to work around that, catch and ignore.
            }
        }
        return null;
    }
    // implement other interface methods similarly

    // required sometime after version 1.13 of dapper
    public ConstructorInfo FindExplicitConstructor()
    {
        return _mappers
            .Select(mapper => mapper.FindExplicitConstructor())
            .FirstOrDefault(result => result != null);
    }
}

And with that in place, it becomes easy to create a custom type mapper that will automatically use the attributes if they're present but will otherwise fall back to standard behavior:

public class ColumnAttributeTypeMapper<T> : FallbackTypeMapper
{
    public ColumnAttributeTypeMapper()
        : base(new SqlMapper.ITypeMap[]
            {
                new CustomPropertyTypeMap(
                   typeof(T),
                   (type, columnName) =>
                       type.GetProperties().FirstOrDefault(prop =>
                           prop.GetCustomAttributes(false)
                               .OfType<ColumnAttribute>()
                               .Any(attr => attr.Name == columnName)
                           )
                   ),
                new DefaultTypeMap(typeof(T))
            })
    {
    }
}

That means we can now easily support types that require map using attributes:

Dapper.SqlMapper.SetTypeMap(
    typeof(MyModel),
    new ColumnAttributeTypeMapper<MyModel>());

Here's a Gist to the full source code.

  • 5
    Recommend making this the official answer - this feature of Dapper is extremely useful. – killthrush Apr 17 '13 at 12:58
  • 1
    is the sample code already included in dapper or should i add it myself??? – Uri Abramson Apr 25 '13 at 10:34
  • 4
    this doesn't work anymore sadly – zerohero Jul 27 '17 at 7:02
  • 3
    Mapping solution posted by @Oliver (stackoverflow.com/a/34856158/364568) works and requires less code. – Riga Apr 18 '18 at 9:51
  • 2
    I love how the word "easily" is thrown around so effortlessly :P – Jonathan B. Jul 22 '18 at 21:49
56

For some time, the following should work:

Dapper.DefaultTypeMap.MatchNamesWithUnderscores = true;
  • 5
    Although this is not really the answer to the question to "Manually Map column names with class properties", for me it's much better than having to manually map (unfortunately in PostgreSQL it's better to use underscores in column names). Please don't remove the MatchNamesWithUnderscores option in the next versions! Thank you!!! – victorvartan Aug 10 '16 at 20:53
  • 5
    @victorvartan there are no plans to remove the MatchNamesWithUnderscores option. At best, if we refactored the configuration API, I would leave the MatchNamesWithUnderscores member in place (that still works, ideally) and add an [Obsolete] marker to point people to the new API. – Marc Gravell Aug 11 '16 at 9:49
  • 3
    @MarcGravell the words "For some time" at the beginning of your answer got me worried that you might remove it in a future version, thanks for clarifying! And a big thank you for Dapper, a wonderful micro ORM that I just started using for a tiny project along with Npgsql on ASP.NET Core! – victorvartan Aug 11 '16 at 12:01
26

Here is a simple solution that doesn't require attributes allowing you to keep infrastructure code out of your POCOs.

This is a class to deal with the mappings. A dictionary would work if you mapped all the columns, but this class allows you to specify just the differences. In addition, it includes reverse maps so you can get the field from the column and the column from the field, which can be useful when doing things such as generating sql statements.

public class ColumnMap
{
    private readonly Dictionary<string, string> forward = new Dictionary<string, string>();
    private readonly Dictionary<string, string> reverse = new Dictionary<string, string>();

    public void Add(string t1, string t2)
    {
        forward.Add(t1, t2);
        reverse.Add(t2, t1);
    }

    public string this[string index]
    {
        get
        {
            // Check for a custom column map.
            if (forward.ContainsKey(index))
                return forward[index];
            if (reverse.ContainsKey(index))
                return reverse[index];

            // If no custom mapping exists, return the value passed in.
            return index;
        }
    }
}

Setup the ColumnMap object and tell Dapper to use the mapping.

var columnMap = new ColumnMap();
columnMap.Add("Field1", "Column1");
columnMap.Add("Field2", "Column2");
columnMap.Add("Field3", "Column3");

SqlMapper.SetTypeMap(typeof (MyClass), new CustomPropertyTypeMap(typeof (MyClass), (type, columnName) => type.GetProperty(columnMap[columnName])));
  • This is a good solution when you basically have a mismatch of properties in your POCO to what your database is returning from, for example, a stored procedure. – crush Sep 26 '14 at 18:28
  • 2
    this doesn't work anymore for some reason? – zerohero Jul 27 '17 at 7:12
  • 1
    I kinda like the conciseness that using an attribute gives, but conceptually this method is cleaner - it doesn't couple your POCO to database details. – Bruno Brant Aug 24 '18 at 15:11
  • If I understand Dapper correctly, it doesn't have a specific Insert() method, just an Execute()... would this mapping approach work for insertions? Or updates? Thanks – DaveInCaz Sep 26 '18 at 19:19
16

I do the following using dynamic and LINQ:

    var sql = @"select top 1 person_id, first_name, last_name from Person";
    using (var conn = ConnectionFactory.GetConnection())
    {
        List<Person> person = conn.Query<dynamic>(sql)
                                  .Select(item => new Person()
                                  {
                                      PersonId = item.person_id,
                                      FirstName = item.first_name,
                                      LastName = item.last_name
                                  }
                                  .ToList();

        return person;
    }
11

An easy way to achieve this is to just use aliases on the columns in your query. If your database column is PERSON_ID and your object's proprty is ID you can just do select PERSON_ID as Id ... in your query and Dapper will pick it up as expected.

11

Taken from the Dapper Tests which is currently on Dapper 1.42.

// custom mapping
var map = new CustomPropertyTypeMap(typeof(TypeWithMapping), 
                                    (type, columnName) => type.GetProperties().FirstOrDefault(prop => GetDescriptionFromAttribute(prop) == columnName));
Dapper.SqlMapper.SetTypeMap(typeof(TypeWithMapping), map);

Helper class to get name off the Description attribute (I personally have used Column like @kalebs example)

static string GetDescriptionFromAttribute(MemberInfo member)
{
   if (member == null) return null;

   var attrib = (DescriptionAttribute)Attribute.GetCustomAttribute(member, typeof(DescriptionAttribute), false);
   return attrib == null ? null : attrib.Description;
}

Class

public class TypeWithMapping
{
   [Description("B")]
   public string A { get; set; }

   [Description("A")]
   public string B { get; set; }
}
  • 1
    In order for it to work even for properties where no description is defined, I changed the return of GetDescriptionFromAttribute to return (attrib?.Description ?? member.Name).ToLower(); and added .ToLower() to columnNamein the map it shouldn't be case sensitive. – Sam White Nov 29 '18 at 21:13
9

Messing with mapping is borderline moving into real ORM land. Instead of fighting with it and keeping Dapper in its true simple (fast) form, just modify your SQL slightly like so:

var sql = @"select top 1 person_id as PersonId,FirstName,LastName from Person";
7

Before you open the connection to your database, execute this piece of code for each of your poco classes:

// Section
SqlMapper.SetTypeMap(typeof(Section), new CustomPropertyTypeMap(
    typeof(Section), (type, columnName) => type.GetProperties().FirstOrDefault(prop =>
    prop.GetCustomAttributes(false).OfType<ColumnAttribute>().Any(attr => attr.Name == columnName))));

Then add the data annotations to your poco classes like this:

public class Section
{
    [Column("db_column_name1")] // Side note: if you create aliases, then they would match this.
    public int Id { get; set; }
    [Column("db_column_name2")]
    public string Title { get; set; }
}

After that, you are all set. Just make a query call, something like:

using (var sqlConnection = new SqlConnection("your_connection_string"))
{
    var sqlStatement = "SELECT " +
                "db_column_name1, " +
                "db_column_name2 " +
                "FROM your_table";

    return sqlConnection.Query<Section>(sqlStatement).AsList();
}
  • 1
    It needs all properties to have Column attribute. Is there any way to map with property in case mapper is not available? – sandeep.gosavi May 14 '18 at 5:16
3

If you're using .NET 4.5.1 or higher checkout Dapper.FluentColumnMapping for mapping the LINQ style. It lets you fully separate the db mapping from your model (no need for annotations)

  • 1
    I am the author of Dapper.FluentColumnMapping. Separating the mappings from the models was one of the primary design goals. I wanted to be to isolate the core data access (i.e. repository interfaces, model objects, etc...) from the database-specific concrete implementations for a clean separation of concerns. Thanks for the mention and I'm glad you found it useful! :-) – Alexander Jun 2 '17 at 21:36
  • github.com/henkmollema/Dapper-FluentMap is similar. But you don't need an 3rd party package anymore. Dapper added Dapper.SqlMapper. See my answer for more details if you are interested. – JedatKinports Aug 2 '17 at 8:56
3

This is piggy backing off of other answers. It's just a thought I had for managing the query strings.

Person.cs

public class Person 
{
    public int PersonId { get; set; }
    public string FirstName { get; set; }
    public string LastName { get; set; }

    public static string Select() 
    {
        return $"select top 1 person_id {nameof(PersonId)}, first_name {nameof(FirstName)}, last_name {nameof(LastName)}from Person";
    }
}

API Method

using (var conn = ConnectionFactory.GetConnection())
{
    var person = conn.Query<Person>(Person.Select()).ToList();
    return person;
}
1

for all of you who use Dapper 1.12, Here's what you need to do to get this done:

  • Add a new column attribute class:

      [AttributeUsage(AttributeTargets.Field | AttributeTargets.Property]
    
      public class ColumnAttribute : Attribute
      {
    
        public string Name { get; set; }
    
        public ColumnAttribute(string name)
        {
          this.Name = name;
        }
      }
    

  • Search for this line:

    map = new DefaultTypeMap(type);
    

    and comment it out.

  • Write this instead:

            map = new CustomPropertyTypeMap(type, (t, columnName) =>
            {
              PropertyInfo pi = t.GetProperties().FirstOrDefault(prop =>
                                prop.GetCustomAttributes(false)
                                    .OfType<ColumnAttribute>()
                                    .Any(attr => attr.Name == columnName));
    
              return pi != null ? pi : t.GetProperties().FirstOrDefault(prop => prop.Name == columnName);
            });
    

    • I'm not sure I understand - are you recommending that users change Dapper to make attribute mapping by columns possible? If so, it's possible using the code I posted above without making changes to Dapper. – Kaleb Pederson Apr 25 '13 at 15:22
    • 1
      But then you'll have to call the mapping function for each and every one of your Model Types won't you?? i'm interested in a generic solution so that all of my types could use the attribute without having to call the mapping for each type. – Uri Abramson Apr 25 '13 at 15:45
    • 2
      I would like to see DefaultTypeMap be implemented using a strategy pattern such that it can be replaced for the reason @UriAbramson mentions. See code.google.com/p/dapper-dot-net/issues/detail?id=140 – Richard Collette Jun 11 '13 at 16:05
    1

    Kaleb Pederson's solution worked for me. I updated the ColumnAttributeTypeMapper to allow a custom attribute (had requirement for two different mappings on same domain object) and updated properties to allow private setters in cases where a field needed to be derived and the types differed.

    public class ColumnAttributeTypeMapper<T,A> : FallbackTypeMapper where A : ColumnAttribute
    {
        public ColumnAttributeTypeMapper()
            : base(new SqlMapper.ITypeMap[]
                {
                    new CustomPropertyTypeMap(
                       typeof(T),
                       (type, columnName) =>
                           type.GetProperties( BindingFlags.NonPublic | BindingFlags.Public | BindingFlags.Instance).FirstOrDefault(prop =>
                               prop.GetCustomAttributes(true)
                                   .OfType<A>()
                                   .Any(attr => attr.Name == columnName)
                               )
                       ),
                    new DefaultTypeMap(typeof(T))
                })
        {
            //
        }
    }
    
    0

    I know this is a relatively old thread, but I thought I'd throw what I did out there.

    I wanted attribute-mapping to work globally. Either you match the property name (aka default) or you match a column attribute on the class property. I also didn't want to have to set this up for every single class I was mapping to. As such, I created a DapperStart class that I invoke on app start:

    public static class DapperStart
    {
        public static void Bootstrap()
        {
            Dapper.SqlMapper.TypeMapProvider = type =>
            {
                return new CustomPropertyTypeMap(typeof(CreateChatRequestResponse),
                    (t, columnName) => t.GetProperties().FirstOrDefault(prop =>
                        {
                            return prop.Name == columnName || prop.GetCustomAttributes(false).OfType<ColumnAttribute>()
                                       .Any(attr => attr.Name == columnName);
                        }
                    ));
            };
        }
    }
    

    Pretty simple. Not sure what issues I'll run into yet as I just wrote this, but it works.

    • What does CreateChatRequestResponse look like? Also, how are you invoking it in the startup? – Glen F. Feb 15 at 16:08
    • @GlenF. the point is that it doesnt matter what CreateChatRequestResponse looks like. it can be any POCO. this gets invoked in your startup. You can just invoke it on your app start either in your StartUp.cs or your Global.asax. – Matt M Feb 22 at 15:56

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