Im trying to learn class-based views, for a detail or list view is not that complicated.

I have a search form and I just want to see if I send a query to show up the results.

Here is the function code (is not mine, is from a django book):

def search_page(request):
    form = SearchForm()
    bookmarks = []
    show_results = False
    if 'query' in request.GET:
        show_results = True
        query = request.GET['query'].strip()
        if query:
            form = SearchForm({'query': query})
            bookmarks = Bookmark.objects.filter(title__icontains=query)[:10]


    show_tags = True
    show_user = True

    if request.is_ajax():
        return render_to_response("bookmarks/bookmark_list.html", locals(), context_instance=RequestContext(request))
    else:
        return render_to_response("search/search.html", locals(), context_instance=RequestContext(request))

Ignoring the ajax fact (just to make the problem easier for now), how can I translate this to class-based views?

I quick tried something like this:

class SearchPageView(FormView):
    template_name = 'search/search.html'

    def get(self, request, *args, **kwargs):
        form = SearchForm()
        self.bookmarks = []
        self.show_results = False
        if 'query' in self.request.GET:
            self.show_results = True
            query = self.request.GET['query'].strip()
            if query:
                form = SearchForm({'query': query})
                self.bookmarks = Bookmark.objects.filter(title__icontains=query)[:10]
        return super(SearchPageView, self).get(request, *args, **kwargs)

    def get_context_data(self, **kwargs):
        context = super(SearchPageView, self).get_context_data(**kwargs)
        context.update({
            'show_tags': True,
            'show_user': True,
            'show_results': self.show_results,
            'bookmarks': self.bookmarks
        })
        return context

Doesn't work, I get a: "'NoneType' object is not callable"

Fair enough, I started today with this stuff.

So, what's the way to make a Class-based views that can manage a get (and a post too if needed) request?

I have another example:

@render_to('registration/register.html')
def register_page(request):
    if request.method == 'POST':
        form = RegistrationForm(request.POST)
        if form.is_valid():
            user = User.objects.create_user(
                username=form.cleaned_data['username'],
                password=form.cleaned_data['password1'],
                email=form.cleaned_data['email']
            )
            return HttpResponseRedirect('/accounts/register/success/')
    else:
        form = RegistrationForm()
    return locals()

Would this be "transformed" the same way that the first one? Or they extend differents Views?

Im confused a lot. I don't know if the first is ProcessFormView and the second FormView or what.

Thanks.

EDIT: Solution I ended with:

class SearchPageView(FormView):
    template_name = 'search/search.html'

    def get(self, request, *args, **kwargs):
        self.bookmarks = []
        self.show_results = False
        form = SearchForm(self.request.GET or None)
        if form.is_valid():
            self.show_results = True
            self.bookmarks = Bookmark.objects.filter(title__icontains=form.cleaned_data['query'])[:10]

        return self.render_to_response(self.get_context_data(form=form))


    def get_context_data(self, **kwargs):
        context = super(SearchPageView, self).get_context_data(**kwargs)
        context.update({
            'show_tags': True,
            'show_user': True,
            'show_results': self.show_results,
            'bookmarks': self.bookmarks
        })
        return context

I leave this here to someone with same question :)

  • 1
    Copying and pasting 'NoneType' object is not callable" is not very helpful. If you look at the line number in the traceback, you can see which line of code is throwing the exception, which might help you to fix it yourself. – Alasdair Jan 18 '12 at 0:32
  • Question updated, you were right, I had to go bed and I thought that I needed to specify my form class and yup yup, you were right. – Jesus Rodriguez Jan 18 '12 at 11:29
up vote 24 down vote accepted

The default behaviour of the FormView class is to display an unbound form for GET requests, and bind the form for POST (or PUT) requests. If the bound form is valid, then the form_valid method is called, which simply redirects to the success url (defined by the success_url attribute or the get_success_url method.

This matches the example quite well. You need to override the form_valid method to create the new User, before calling the superclass method to redirect to the success url.

class CreateUser(FormView):
    template_name = 'registration/register.html'
    success_url = '/accounts/register/success/'
    form_class = RegistrationForm

    def form_valid(self, form):
        user = User.objects.create_user(
                username=form.cleaned_data['username'],
                password=form.cleaned_data['password1'],
                email=form.cleaned_data['email']
        )
        return super(CreateUser, self).form_valid(form)

Your first example does not match the flow of FormView so well, because you aren't processing a form with POST data, and you don't do anything when the form is valid.

I might try extending TemplateView, and putting all the logic in get_context_data. Once you get that working, you could factor the code that parses the GET data and returns the bookmarks into its own method. You could look at extending ListView, but I don't think there's any real advantage unless you want to paginate results.

  • Works like a charm this example (changing the name of the attributes :P) But I still think that the first example need a correct class-based view representation. – Jesus Rodriguez Jan 18 '12 at 11:36
  • 1
    Yes, good spot, I've fixed the attribute names. – Alasdair Jan 18 '12 at 11:45
  • Can you please help me out here. When you define user object, where does it go after form_valid method, it is as magic for me. – izdi Apr 24 '14 at 15:19
  • @skzd I afraid I don't understand what you mean. Unless there is a mistake in my answer above, please open a new question instead of adding a comment here. – Alasdair Apr 24 '14 at 16:25
  • @skzd, After form_valid runs the function exits and the page is redirected to success_url. Thats it until more user interaction occurs. – AdamG Feb 14 '16 at 4:56

Note, an answer here (Updating context data in FormView form_valid method?) solved this problem like this:

class ContextFormView(FormView):
    template_name = 'some_template.html'
    success_url = '...'
    form_class = ClassOfTheForm

    def get(self, request, *args, **kwargs):
        form_class = self.get_form_class()
        form = self.get_form(form_class)
        context = self.get_context_data(**kwargs)
        context['form'] = form
        return self.render_to_response(context)

    def post(self, request, *args, **kwargs):
        form_class = self.get_form_class()
        form = self.get_form(form_class)
        if form.is_valid():
            return self.form_valid(form, **kwargs)
        else:
            return self.form_invalid(form, **kwargs)


    def form_invalid(self, form, **kwargs):
        context = self.get_context_data(**kwargs)
        context['form'] = form
        # here you can add things like:
        context[show_results] = False
        return self.render_to_response(context)

    def form_valid(self, form, **kwargs):
        context = self.get_context_data(**kwargs)
        context['form'] = form
        # here you can add things like:
        context[show_results] = True
        return self.render_to_response(context)

This worked perfect for me. (same issue as in this question)

As stated above, this is not my solution, if you want to give somebody credits, go to the answer in the link and give this person the credits! (Updating context data in FormView form_valid method?)

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