55

The only way I've found of retrieving MCC and MNC is by overriding an activity's onConfigurationChanged method, as such:

public void onConfigurationChanged(Configuration config)
{
    super.onConfigurationChanged(config);
    DeviceData.MCC = "" + config.mcc;
    DeviceData.MNC = ""  +config.mnc;
}

However, I need this data as soon as the app starts and can't wait for the user to switch the phone's orientation or equivalent to trigger this method. Is there a better way to access the current Configuration object?

0
96

The TelephonyManager has a method to return the MCC+MNC as a String (getNetworkOperator()) which will do you what you want. You can get access it via:

protected void onCreate(Bundle savedInstanceState) {
    super.onCreate(savedInstanceState);

    TelephonyManager tel = (TelephonyManager) getSystemService(Context.TELEPHONY_SERVICE);
    String networkOperator = tel.getNetworkOperator();

    if (!TextUtils.isEmpty(networkOperator)) {
        int mcc = Integer.parseInt(networkOperator.substring(0, 3));
        int mnc = Integer.parseInt(networkOperator.substring(3));
    }
}
6
  • 7
    getNetworkOperator() will return an empty string if a SIM card is not inserted. So the if condition should contain !networkOperator.isEmpty(). I tested it on my Nexus 5 Feb 24 '14 at 10:59
  • 1
    Also, it will fail in case of MVNO
    – gvaish
    Mar 6 '14 at 5:48
  • getNetworkOperator() returns false. A SIM card is inserted. Why? Jul 14 '16 at 0:10
  • 4
    How to handle dual sim devices?
    – Antonio
    Aug 15 '17 at 16:25
  • 'networkOperator.substring(0, 3)' this will get index out of bounds error in some situations Mar 2 '18 at 13:12
22

You do know there are two MCC/MNC's for an active phone? (One is the country code and carrier id for the Sim card, the other is for the network/cell tower in use.)

If the getResources().getConfiguration().mcc is not empty in airplane mode, it's the Sim value TelephonyManager.getSimOperator(), not the tower value TelephonyManager.getNetworkOperator().

I don't know which the OP wants, but Answer 3 will give him different results than his original code if the getConfiguration is really the Sim values.

1
  • What is the difference between getNetworkOperator() and getSimOperator();
    – rupesh
    Jan 6 '16 at 9:54
6

getResources().getConfiguration().mcc is a bad choice because it returns an integer, hence compromising valid values such as 01, or 044. Clearly integer is not a good option for this.

See details in Mobile_Network_Code

Update: in Australia, we verified a wrong case here. The getNetworkOperator returns different value from getSimOperator, where the latter is correct.

See details in Android doc: TelephonyManager

5

You can access the current configuration by getResources().getConfiguration() does the trick.

2

Okay, it turns out that the getResources().getConfiguration().mcc trick is likely better for most purposes, because with the other one if the person puts their phone in airplane mode or otherwise uses Wi-Fi, then it returns an empty MCC.

2

I found out that network operator sometimes can be like 65@5 when not connected to the operator (service unavailable) even if there is a a SIM card inserted. This happened on Samsung S2 running Android 4.1.2.

enter image description here

So you have to be careful when converting to Int.

 int mcc = Integer.parseInt(networkOperator.substring(0, 3));
0

this is updated. use this

 TelephonyManager tel = (TelephonyManager) getSystemService(Context.TELEPHONY_SERVICE);
    String networkOperator = tel.getSimOperator();
    System.out.println("************mnc,mcc"+networkOperator);
    if (!TextUtils.isEmpty(networkOperator)) {
         mcc = networkOperator.substring(0, 3);
       mnc = networkOperator.substring(3);System.out.println("************mnc,mcc"+mnc+mcc);
    }mnc_mcc.setText("************mnc,mcc"+mnc+","+mcc);
}

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